Frank G. (Frank George) Carpenter.

Carpenter's new geographical reader; South America online

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Online LibraryFrank G. (Frank George) CarpenterCarpenter's new geographical reader; South America → online text (page 1 of 21)
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CARPENTER'S NEW GEOGRAPHICAL READER



SOUTH AMERICA



BY
FRANK G. CARPENTER, Litt.D., F.R.G.S.

AUTHOR OF

«< AROUND THE WORLD WITH THE CHILDREN" AND

"READERS ON COMMERCE AND INDUSTRY"




AMERICAN BOOK COMPANY

NEW YORK CINCINNATI CHICAGO

BOSTON ATLANTA



694G9



BOOKS BY
FRANK G. CARPENTER



"Reading Carpenter Is Seeing the World"

UntroDuction to ©cograpbs

AROUND THE WORLD WITH THE CHILDREN

©cograpblcal IReaDers

NORTH AMERICA

SOUTH AMERICA

EUROPE

ASIA

AFRICA

AUSTRALIA AND ISLANDS OF THE SEA

IRca&ers on Commerce anJ) Hn&ustri?

HOW THE WORLD IS FED
HOW THE WORLD IS CLOTHED
HOW THE WORLD IS HOUSED



Copyright, 1899, 1912, 1915, 1921, by

FRANK G. CARPENTER

E. p, 3



1-

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PREFACE

This book is a revised edition of Carpenter's Geographical
Reader, "South America," which for many years has been
widely used in our schools. It is more than a revision,
however, for it is a new work based upon up-to-date in-
formation gathered by the author during a recent tour of
more than twenty-five thousand miles made by him in the
countries described.

During this tour Mr. Carpenter has kept the children
always in mind, and his story of their travels will, it is
beheved, bring them into a close personal relation with
their brothers and sisters of South America. It will give
them also a live working knowledge of the geography, re-
sources, and people of each of the republics, and of the
social, industrial, and commercial relations which each
holds to the United States.

The plan is the same as that adopted in all the books of
this series. It consists of imaginary travels made by the
children with the author in the countries described. In
this volume the children start out on a voyage from New
York to the Isthmus of Panama, and from there move about
leisurely from one South American country to another,
making their observations and studies along the lines above
mentioned. It is the children who do the traveling, and
the book is the story of what they see and learn.

Here and there throughout the story the author has in-
serted questions which suggest interesting research work
for the children. These will, it is beheved, add greatly to

7



8 PREFACE

the value of the book. In connection with this feature,
tables and diagrams of statistical information will be
found at the back, and maps have been freely introduced
throughout the text. The pictures also will furnish ma-
terial for study. Most of them are new, and many
are from photographs taken by the author to illustrate
this book.

In order to bring out the world relations of South Amer-
ica, frequent comparisons with the United States and
other countries and people of the world should be made
by the children. For this purpose, reference to the other
volumes of the Carpenter Readers will prove valuable. For
example, in connection with the diamond mines of Brazil,
the interest and information of the child will be increased
by comparing them with the diamond mines of Kimberley
in Carpenter's "Africa," by reading of the diamond indus-
try in Carpenter's "How the World is Clothed," and by a
visit to the diamond cutting estabhshments of Amsterdam,
in Carpenter's "Europe." In the same way, the world
study of cotton, coffee, rubber, wool, meat, and almost
every other product of South America may be developed.

The two series of books referred to in this connection
comprise Carpenter's Geographical Readers on North Amer-
ica, South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia,
and his Industrial Readers entitled: "How the World is
Clothed," "How the World is Fed," and "How the World
is Housed."



CONTENTS



I. Introduction

II. From New York to Panama

III. Panama and the Pacific Ocean .

IV. We Steam through the Canal .
V. The Republic of Colombia .

VI. Up the Magdalena to Bogota .

VII. Emeralds and Platinum

VIII. A Land of the Equator

IX. Climbing the Andes to Quito

X. In the Great South American Desert

XI. In Lima, the Capital of Peru .

XII. Up the Andes

XIII. On the Roof of South America

XIV. Steamboating above the Clouds
XV. Travels in Bolivia ....

XVI. The Mineral Wealth of the Andes .

XVII. Chile — The Nitrate Desert and the G

Islands

XVIII. Along the Coast to Valparaiso

XIX. Across South America by Rail .

• XX. Santiago, the Capital of Chile

XXI. A Visit to a Chilean Farm

XXII. Southern Chile and the Araucantans

XXIII. In the Coal Mines of Chile

XXIV. In and about the Strait of Magellan

9



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lO



CONTENTS



XXV. At the End of the Continent

XXVI. Argentina — Patagonia ....

XXVII. In Argentina — Life on the Pampas

XXVIII. The Bread Lands of South America

XXIX. Buenos Aires

XXX. Uruguay — Montevideo ....

XXXI. Up the Rio de la Plata System

XXXII. The Gran Chaco

XXXIII. Paraguay .......

XXXIV. A Trip into the Interior op Paraguay
XXXV. Mate, or Paraguay Tea ....

XXXVI. Brazil

XXXVII. The Wilds of Matto Grosso .

XXXVIII. The Niagara of South America — Southern

Brazil

XXXIX. Santos and Sao Paulo . . .

XL. In the Land of Coffee ....

XLI. A City of Snakes — Some Wild Animals of

Brazil

XLII. Rio de Janeiro

XLIII. More about Rio

XLIV. Bahl^

XLV. The Mines of Brazil — Diamonds, Iron, and

Gold

XLVI. Along the Coast of Brazil

XLVII. The King of Rivers

XL VIII. Para, the Metropolis of the Amazon .

XLIX. In the Land of Rubber ....

L. A Trip on the Amazon River .

LI. Some Wild Indians of Brazil .



CONTENTS



II



PAGE

LII. The Orinoco and the Llanos 365

LIII. Venezuela and Its Capital 370

LIV. La Guaira and Caracas 373

LV. The Guianas 379

Tables 390

Index 397



LIST OF MAPS

South America (colored map)

South America (black relief map)

New York to Panama (route map)

Canal Zone (black relief map)

Colombia (route map)

Ecuador (route map)

Peru (route rl^p) .

Bolivia (route map)

Chile (route map) .

Argentina (route map)

Uruguay (route map)

Paraguay (route map)

Brazil (route map)

Venezuela (route map)

The Guianas (route map)



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18
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371

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Online LibraryFrank G. (Frank George) CarpenterCarpenter's new geographical reader; South America → online text (page 1 of 21)