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LIBRARY

OF THE

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA.






Class



Zbc Xlbrar\> H660ciation Scries

EDITED BY J. Y.W.MAC .\LISTEK, HON. SECRETARY OF THE ASSOCI.ATION

No. 6.
BOOKS FOR

VILLAGE LIBEAKIES



FRANK J. BURGOYNE

LIBRARIAN OK T H K I, A M K K T H P U U H C L I R R A R I K S
AND

JOHN BALLINGER

LIBRARIAN O 1 T H K 1' r H I. I f I, I 1) R A R 1 E S , C A K 1) I h I



With Notes upon the Organization and Management of Village

Libraries

JAMES D. BROWN







LONDON ;








K Y




PUBLISHED


FOR THE ASSOCIATION


BY






SIMPKIN,


MARSHALL,


HAMILTON


KENT


&


CO.,


Limited


4.


STATIONERS' HALL


COURT,


E.C








1895











Price One Shilling, net.



THE NORTH OF ENGLAND

SCHOOL FURNISHING CO.,

(Limited),

121, Newgate Street, LONDON, E.G.



Manufacturers of FURNITURE for

ELEMENTARY, COLLEGIATE,

TECHNICAL,

SCIENCE & ART SCHOOLS,

CHEMICAL and PHYSICAL LABORATORIES,

AND

Public Libraries.



The Company has a reputation for excellence of workman-
ship and material, and has furnished many of the principal
LIBRARIES and SCHOOLS in London and the provinces to the
satisfaction of its numerous clients.

Enquiries for Catalogues, Estimates, or information will be
promptly responded to.



MAKERS OF THE

DARLINGTON SELF-ADJUSTING NEWSPAPER CLIP.

NO SPRING. FIRM GRIP. SIMPLE IN CONSTRUCTION.



Catalogues and Estimates free on application to the

School Furnishing Co., Limited,

DARLINGTON, NEWCASTLE-ON-TYNE,
MIDDLESBROUGH, SUNDERLAND, and LONDON.



Xibrarv? Bssociation Series

No f).

VILLAGE LIBEAEIBS

BV

FRANK J. ]5URGOYNE
JOHN BALLINGER

A N I )

JAMES D. BROWN



LIBRARY ASSOCIATION OF THE UNITED KINGDOM.



Ptesident : The Marquis of Dufferin and Ava, K.P., G.C.B.



The Library Association of the United Kingdom was founded on October
5th, 1877, at the conclusion of the Library Conference held ai the London
Institution, under the presidency of the late Mr J. Winter Jones, then
Principal Librarian of the British Museum

Its objects are (a) to aid in the establishment of new libraries ; (b) to
endeavour to secure better legislation for public libraries ; (c) to unite all
persons engaged or interested in library work, for the purpose of promoting
the best possible administration of libraries : and (d) to encourage biblio-
graphical research.

The Association has, bv the invitation of the local authorities, held its
Annual Meetings in the following cities and towns :— Oxford, Manchester,
Edinburgh, London {twice), Cambridge, Liverpool, Dublin, Plymouth, Bir-
mingham, Glasgow, Reading, Nottingham, Paris. Aberdeen, and Belfast.

The official organ of the Association is The Library, which is issued
monthly and sent post free to Members. In this .magazine (edited bv
Mr. J. Y. W. MacAIister) appear the papers read at Annual and Monthly
Meetings, and a report of the Proceedings of the Association.

Monthly Meetings are held on the second Monday of each month, from
October to June, and are reported in The Lilyarv.

The Annual Subscription is One Guinea, payable in advance on
January ist. The Life Subscription is Fifteen Guineas. Any person engaged
in Library administration, or any Library or Institution, may become a Member,
■ivithout election, on payment of the Subscription to the Treasurer. Any person not
so engaged may be elected at the Monthly or Annual Meetings. Librar\-
Assistants, approved by the Council, are admitted on payment ot a Subscrip-
tion of Half-a-Guinea.

The Association has instituted an Examination in Librarianship, and
issues certificates to those who satisfy the examiners.

A large number of interesting and important papers have been published
in the Transactions, Monthly Notes, The Library Chronicle, and in The Library.
A complete list of these and other publications will be found in the Library
Association Year Book. The Publishers to the Association are Messrs.
Simpkin, Marshall & Co., 4, Stationers' Hall Court, EC, to whom all orders
should be sent.

The Hon. Secretary will be glad to recsive papers from Members, and
others, on appropriate subjects, for reading at the Monthly and Annual
Meetings.

20, Hanover Square.



^be Xibrar^ Bseociation Scrica

EDITED EV J. Y. W. MAC ALISTER, HON. SECRETARY OF THE ASSOCIATION

No. 6.
BOOKS FOE

VILLAGE LIBRAEIES

BY

FRANK T. BURGOYNE

LIBRARIAN OF THK I. AMRETH PUBLIC LIBRARIES
AND

JOHN BALLINGER

LIBRARIAN OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARIES, CARDIFF



With Notes upon the Organization and Management of Village

Libraries

BY

JAMES D. BROWN

LIBRARIAN' OF THE ^ I f " f,- " - y,- ^ L L PUBLIC LIBRARY




LONDON :

PUBLISHED FOR THE ASSOCIATION BY

SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, HAMILTON, KENT & CO., Limited
4, STATIONERS' HALL COURT. EC.

1895



/






LONDON :

Truslove & Bkav, Library Catalogue Printers,
West Norwood, S.E.



• :. , :-£>■ .



PREFACE



This pamphlet has been prepared at the request of the
Council of the Library Association of the United Kingdom.
The want of a guide to the organisation of small Libraries
has long been felt, and the impetus which recent legislation
has given to the establishment of libraries in rural districts
has increased the need. We have attempted to compile a
list of i,ooo volumes fairly representative of English
Literature, and including a liberal selection of the scientific
and technical books most likely to be useful. It is not
pretended that this is a list of the i,ooo "best" books,
or even of the books which we think should be read, but
we have tried to include the works which, during a long
experience of Public Library work, we have found to be
most useful and acceptable to the readers.

Li addition to the books mentioned, the following works
of reference will be found most useful : — An Atlas, English
Dictionary, Encyclopaedia, Whitaker's Almanac, Hazell's



1 03740



VI. PRI-.FACi:.

Annual, Statesman's Year-Book, and all local County
Histories, Guide Books, and Directories.

The published prices of the books are given, off which
any bookseller will be glad to give a substantial discount for
cash. The editions priced are in cloth bindings, but the
novels and books in most demand may advantageously be
bought bound in leather, suitable for the hard wear and
tear of lending library work. Prices can be obtained from
Mr. ^^^ Easy, and the Library Bureau (see advertisements).

The compilers will be glad to give any further help and
advice to those interested in this phase of library work.

Frank J. Burgoyne,

The Tate Central Library,

Brixton, London.
John Ballinger,

Public Libraries, Cardiff.




THE



ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT



VILLAGE LENDING LIBRARIES.



The following brief hints are confined to the method of dealing
Avith books when acquired, and such matters as properly belong
to the actual working of the Lending Library when established.
The important questions of finance, staff, and housing do not
fall within the scope of these notes, though they very materially
affect almost every point to be touched upon.

The primary requisite in every library, large or small, is
system, and the simpler the system can be made the more
effective will be the work accomplished. Simplicity will, there-
fore, be adopted as the guiding principle of all methods about to
be described, and each process will be taken in its consecutive
order. The first thing to be done when the books, or selection
of books, from this catalogue are received, is to make an inven-
tory of them, which shall show every particular likely to be
required for reference in the future. For this purpose a

STOCK BOOK

must be used, which should be ruled as follows with columns of
suitable width : —





STOCK BOOK OF


THL






LIBRARY.






s


Author.


Title.




"o
>

d




Donor or
Vendor.


0) a

a.


a.
<u'33


[-1


















1895.




I


Baker (Sir S.W.)


Rifle & Hound
in Ceylon


B


I


1890


Sotheran


z 6


Aug. 6




2


Lubbock (Sir J.)


Pleasures of
Life


E


I


N.D.


Anonymously


-


Sept. 7




3


Tennyson (Lord)


Poetical Works


D


I


1895


H.R. Tedder,
Esq..





Sept. 7





2 • ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

This inventory may have, in addition, a column for the
pubhsher's name, but this is hardly necessary in these days of
catalogues of literature. It is enough for ordinary purposes if
the Stock Book enables any book to be traced ; gives an exact
record of the number and kind of books in the library ; and
notes the date and manner of their accession. The cost of a
suitable Stock Book, specially ruled and printed as above, would
be comparatively large if undertaken by each Library indepen-
dently, but could be greatly reduced by co-operation. If three
or four different libraries agreed to have identical books, any
stationer could arrange to supply them cheaply.

CLASSIFICATION.

Before the books are entered it is necessary they should be
classified, and as it is improbable that any Village Library will
have works in every department of literature, a very simple
system will suffice. The following classes are recommended : —

A. Theology, Church History, Philosophy.

B. History, Travel, Biography.

C. Arts and Sciences.

D. Fiction, Poetry and Drama.

E. Miscellaneous.

Assuming, then, that this classification is adopted, and a Stock
Book has also been obtained, the numbering and classification
may be proceeded with. When the first batch of books bought
is received, they should be arranged in order of invoice, checked,
and then entered in the Stock Book. The stock number should
then be written on the back of the title-page with the class letter
of the work, the second book getting the second number, and so
on to the end, irrespective of class order. Donations are to
be dealt with in a similar fashion, save that they ought also to
be entered in another book showing the Date of Receipt, Name
of Donor, Titles of Books, and the Numbers and Class Letters
given to them. This need not be specially ruled. An ordinary
plain ruled foolscap folio book will serve.

When all the books have been classed and numbered, they
require to be labelled, cut, stamped and catalogued before
being placed on the shelves. The label should be so arranged
as to serve for a mark of proprietorship like a book-plate, and as



01- VILLAGE LENDING LIBRARIES.



a register of issues. A suitable size would be 4A X 3-^ inches,
printed and ruled as under : —



Class B.



No. I.



VILLAGE LIBRARY.



Days allowed for reading this Book, which must be kept

clean and duly returned in time, failing which a Fine of

per week will be charged.



Aug. 6,95.



The ruled spaces are to be stamped with the dates of issue.
These labels should be neatly pasted inside the front board of
each book. When the leaves are cut, care should be taken to
separate each section right into the back, otherwise when the
book is opened flat an ugly tear will be made in one or other of
the leaves. The books should next be stamped on the margins
of various pages, but in a recognised order — say, front end
paper, title-page, page i of text, page 25, page 50, page 100,
and so on, also last page of text, and all plates on separate
sheets. The top right-hand corner is usually selected as the
most convenient place to impress the stamps. Rubber stamps
of an approved shape should be used along with Stephens'
Endorsing Ink. Any stationer will supply both stamps and ink.

The words " Village Library" will be sufficient

in most cases.

When the books have undergone all these processes they are
ready for cataloguing and shelving.

CATALOGUING.

The best form of catalogue will be that which shows in one
alphabet the authors, subjects, and titles of every book in the
library. The simplest way of compiling it is to ha\e a number
of slips of paper cut about 6 by i^ inches, and write the neces-



4 ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

sary entries for each book on a separate slip. Entries under
the author's name should be full. The title entry may be
abbreviated, and the subject entry can be c;it down to the
author's name, if the strictest economy is desired. The first
book to be catalogued is No. i in the Stock Book. Turn up
the title-page, and from it write on a slip at the left-hand side
the author's surname, his Christian name or other initials, the
title of the book, the date of publication, except in the case of
novels, and the class letter and number : —

Baker (Sir S. W.) Rifle and hound in Ceylon. 1890. Bi.

This is an ordinary author-entry, but a good cataloguer may
add explanatory words just to indicate what the book is about.
These need not occupy much space, but should follow the title
before the date, and might be distinguished by square brackets.
The subject slip will be the subject word with the author's
name : —

Ceylon. See Baker (Sir S. W.)

The title-slip would appear as : —

Rifle and hound in Ceylon. Baker. Bi.

When the whole of the books have been thus catalogued, the
slips should be sorted out in rough alphabetical order of the first
words, and afterwards arranged in close alphabetical order,
authors, subjects and titles being amalgamated. The whole of
the single slips made for one subject might then be re-written
upon one slip so as to insure clearness.

The slips when arranged should next be pasted down on
convenient-sized sheets, say about 16 by 7 inches, and the
whole should then be carefully edited. That is to say, alpha-
betical order revised, authors' repeated names struck out, and
general accuracy of work tested. To simplify identification, the
class and number could be added to the author's name under
subject references, but in most cases it will be unnecessary.

All other points in cataloguing likely to arise may be studied
in No. 5 of this Series, "Cataloguing Rules," 1894, price Sixpence.
The subject is one of some difficulty, and compilers of small
library catalogues are strongly recommend to ask expert advice
before embarking on the task. There are many points which
are sure to arise on which it is impossible to touch in this
handbook, because of qualifications or differences which occur
in every library. The writer of this will be glad to advise
anyone who cares to apply to him direct, and no doubt any



Ol- VlI.LAGIi I.KNDINC. 1,1 HRAKI1-;S. 5

public librarian will give advice if asked. If one copy of a
catalogue to be consulted at the Library will serve, it can be
kept in manuscript on cards or slip books at a cost of from 15s.
to 30S. Or classified lists in framed placards can be used, which
would serve most purposes when a printed catalogue cannot be
undertaken.

SHELVING.

The books being now ready, have next to be placed on the
shelves in such an order that they can easily be found when
wanted. There are many ways of doing this, but only two are
recommended for small Village Libraries, unless it is proposed
to admit borrowers directly to the shelves, when an entirely
different method must be adopted. Assuming, however, that it
is not intended to give this privilege, the books may be arranged
in one sequence of numbers exactly as they stand in the Stock
Book. This method is easy, but extremely crude, and has the
great disadvantage of separating the works of the same authors,
like novelists, which it is desirable to keep together. A prefer-
able plan is to take out all the A's, B's, C's, etc., and arrange
each class in numerical order as far as possible — A5, 20, 60, 70,
go, 135, etc.; Bi, 6, 8, 21, etc.; C3, 7, g, ig, and so on.
D, however, should be arranged alphabetically, so as to bring
together all the novels of any given author. There is a great
amount of practical convenience in this, as readers more fre-
quently ask if any of so-and-so's novels are in than if such a
number is in. When this has been done the books may be
placed on the shelves, space being left where necessary for
additions, and each class being distinguished by class letter
labels attached to the presses. The question of numbering the
books on the outside must be decided by local circumstances.
Stamping in gilt on the backs is a somewhat costly operation.
Paper tags are cheaper, but are unsightly and soon come off.
If borrowers are instructed to bring lists of wants in the
following form, outside labelling or numbering may be entirely
dispensed with : —

Angus. Bible Handbook, A5.

If the shelves are labelled as under the finding of the books will
be as simple as possible.



A Theology. Nos. 5 to 321.



6 ORGANIZATION ANl:) MANAGEMENT

The list of wants directs both to the actual shelf, and the book
can be picked out by its title almost instantly. This method
of shelving is, on the whole, the simplest, cheapest, and most
effective, especially if the most popular class (D) is arranged
alphabetically by authors.

CHARGING OR REGISTRATION.

This important process has to do with recording books which
are issued to borrowers and must show if any given book is in or
out, who has it, and when it was issued. It may also show what
books any reader has had, and give other details. Needless to
say, the methods of registration are numberless. Mechanical
systems of much ingenuity are used in most of the large town
libraries, which would be unnecessary in a village library. The
plan about to be described will be found best for small libraries.
Let a card of stout manilla or other substance, measuring say
4 by 2 inches, be written for each book, giving class, number,
author, and title as in the Stock Book. Thus :



1 B

Baker.

Rifle and Hound in Ceylon.


No.


Date. 1 No. ^ Date.


351


Aug. 6, '95





These cards are ruled to take the borrower's number and date
of issue, and should be arranged in a tray or trays of suitable
dimensions, with projecting guides to show where each hundred
begins. Each reader on joining the library will be supplied with



OF VILLAGE LENDING LIBRARIES.



a folded card of tough manilla (3 by 2 inches) bearing his number,
name, address, and the date when his ticket expires : —



351. November 6th, 1895.

(Available for 12 months).

JOHN JONES,

31, East Road.

Not Transferable.



On the back, the name of the Library may be printed, with any
regulations considered necessary. The two inside pages may be
ruled with columns like the book cards to take the numbers of
the books read by the borrower. The card is retained by the
borrower when he has no books on loan. The system is worked
thus : The borrower having filled up a slip of paper with a list
of the books he would like to read, hands it to the librarian along
with his ticket. The librarian, by turning up the tray of book-
cards, ascertains if any of the books wanted are in. Suppose, for
example, John Jones, 351, has asked for Hughes' "Tom Brown,"
D4, among others, and it is in, the librarian simply withdraws
book-card D4 and places it in the borrower's ticket, fetches the
book and stamps the label with the date of issue. The issue will,
therefore, be recorded like this by the mere junction of the two



*—m Book Card
enclosed in
< — as Borrower's Card.



4 D






Hughes.


351


November 6th, 1895.




JOHN JONES.



cards, and, at the moment of issue, represents all that need be
done if several persons are waiting to be served. Later on, when
there is no pressure, the borrower's number and date of issue may
be written on to the book-card and the book number on to the
borrower's card. The cards representing the day's issue should



8 ORGAXIZATION AND MAX AGENFENT

next be counted by classes to ascertain the day"s work and then
arranged in numerical order of book-cards, care being taken to
keep each book-card inside the proper borrower's card. When
placed in a suitable tray behind a projection to show the date of
issue all the books on loan are kept together in chronological and
numerical order. When D4 is returned, the date on its label
directs to the place where it is registered and the librarian merely
removes the two cards, returning the borrower his and the book-
card to its place. It will be seen that, by this system, overdue
books gradually declare themselves automatically, and that the
absence of a book-card from its place in the original tray at once
indicates that the book is out. With suitable guides and projec-
tions it is easy to ascertain in a few seconds where any particular
book is and how long it has been out.

To make a system on these lines will not cost a great amount,
but a charging method of this sort is already to be had without
trouble, and it is nearly perfect in every detail, including Book-
cards, Trays, Guides, Borrowers' Cards, etc. For a library
containing 1,000 volumes a complete outfit is supplied for about
25/- by Mr. A. W. Lambert, ii. Sunny Bank, South Norwood,
London, S.E. It will practically last for ever, the only expense
being for occasional supplies of borrowers' cards, which only cost
a few shillings per 1,000. Before leaving the subject of registra-
tion it should be pointed out that an Issue Book must be kept
in which to enter the classified results of each day's issues. An
ordinary quarto or foolscap folio book of three or four quires will
serve, and it can be ruled to show each day's transactions like
this :—





V


ILLAGE Library.


Issue Book.


Date.


A


B


c


D


E Total.


Average.


1S95.














Aug. I .. ..


3


2


8


25


9 47




„ 2 . .


2


6


5


30


10 53




,. 4 •• ••


4


7


4


29


7


51




.. 31 •• ••


I


6


3


27


6


43




Totals . . . .


10


21


20


III


32


194


48



oi' vn.i.ACi: i.KxinNc. i.ihk \kii''-S.



Another important book is the Register of Boppoweps
with its alphabetical index. The Register may be ruled like this
in an ordinary three or four-quire foolscap book : —



No.


Name.


Address.


Ticket expires.


I
2


Frank Francis
Henry Parker
John Jones


3, St. Gothard's Road . . . .
3, Pyrmont Grove
31, East Road


Dec. II, 1895.
June 30, i8g6.
Nov. 6, 1895.



To this an index of names, giving addresses, numbers, and dates
of expiry, should be made, preferably on small cards or slips
of thick paper, kept in alphabetical order.

The questions of Application Forms, Guarantee Forms, etc.,
depend so entirely on the Rules adopted that it is impossible to
lay down any hard and fast lines for guidance. The Committees
of Parish Libraries should communicate with the librarians of.
adjoining towns, who would no doubt, give copies of their forms,
etc., which might, when modified to suit local needs, serve as
models. The matter of suitable Book-cases and other fittings is
also largely one of local ways and means, and it would be
impossible to do more than direct to sources from which informa-
tion may be had. The following list of books is therefore
recommended to the notice of those in charge of Village libraries
as containing information likely to prove useful and suggestive
on those points not touched upon in these notes.

Greenwood (T.) " Public Libraries." is. Cassell & Co.

do. "Sunday School and Village Libraries." is. 3d. Clarke & Co.

Fovargue and Ogle "Public Library Legislation." 2s. 6d. Simpkin.
Brown (J. D.) "Library Appliances." is. Simpkin.
Cowell (P.) "Public Library Staffs." 6d. Simpkin.

The interest in the establishment of Parish or Village Libraries
is so great among all the public librarians of the country that
little difficulty should be experienced in getting advice on most
points almost anywhere. Should, however, any difficulty be met
with, the writer will be glad to explain possible obscurities in
the foregoing notes or give any further information.

JAMES D. BROWN, Libvarian,

Clerkenwell Public Library,
London, E.G.



Alphabetical Author List of One Thousand Volumes
suitable for a Village Library.



N.B. — Biographies are entered under the name of the person written
about, instead of that of the Author.



Abney (W. de W.) Instruction in Photography
AcLAND (Sir T. D.) Chemistry of Farming . .
AcwORTH (W. M.) Railways of England
Addison (Joseph) [Life of] . By Courtliope — English

Men of Letters . .
.-Esop's Fables
AiNSWORTH (W. H.) Novels and Tales : — . .

Guy Fawkes The Tower of London

Old St. Paul's Windsor Castle

Alcott (Louisa M.) Tales : —

Jo's Boys Little Women

Little Men Work

Allen (Joseph) Battles of the British Navy. 2 vols.
Allen (Grant) Anglo-Saxon Britain— Early Britnin

Series
Allingham (W.) The Ballad Book
Angus (J. ) Bible Handbook


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Online LibraryFrank James BurgoyneBooks for village libraries; → online text (page 1 of 5)