Copyright
Frank Overton.

The Business Educator (Volume 13) online

. (page 62 of 89)
Online LibraryFrank OvertonThe Business Educator (Volume 13) → online text (page 62 of 89)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Teachers who want to keep well informed in regard to all subjects pertaining to commercial educa-
tion should be on our mailing list to receive The Budget." It can be had free of charge by any teacher
who will request it. The next number will contain some interesting matter. A postal will bring it.

Educational Publishers SA.DLfE^R" R.OWE^ CO* Baltimore. Md.



Rounding Out the Oommercial Course

No-w Is the Tlnrve to act quickly in the matter of arranging for advanced
work in bookkeeping for your spring classes.

Aclvaixoed Sets cannot be found that are superior in content, in presentation and development of
subject, in practical usefulness, or in excellence of printing and binding, to

Wholesale Accoxintlti^ a.t^<l Mercantile A,ccot;mti»i^

Both of these business practice sets are of the hlgheat type-
true to business customs and practices in minutest detail.

Wholesale Accounting is a so-called "voucher" set which teaches much more than merely the use
of business papers. It teaches the actual customs and practices of the business represented. It familiar-
izes students with markets, shipping processes and routes, terms of sale, and facts in regard to the
merchandise handled, in a way which educates and fascinates. It takes them into the realm of real busi-
ness life more completely than does any business practice set that has ever before been written.

It should be used to follow any good beginners ' text.

Mercantile Accounting, though entirely diflferent from Wholesale Accounting, possesses all its
excellent qualities. It is, however, a more advanced set. The bookkeeping features of this set are of the
very highest type. The transactions involved are of an advanced nature. The computations involved will
test and develop the mental strength of the students.

If you have not tried these sets In your school you cannot welt afford to miss
what they offer you and your school. Try them on a few of your students, and
both you and the students will be delightod with the result. Write at once to

173 W.b»h VS4^^Xr¥P¥9C /5\ T ^r/^lMA ll3)Bro.dway

CHICAGO mrxjynr iC^M%s% *<nL tL§M.%jr%^ newyork



\_X^ ■-^»<^t^«t<^!Siai^-^.^;<z;»t^^^i..<^ii^^^a>^g^.^i^^<<^g<a^^g^^^ (S^i^i^^iz/i^ J^ j



THE




TEACHERS' PROFESSIONAL EDITION. ONE DOLLAR A YEAR



APRIL, 1908



|S-*».?s*i«iB«*<K-'




PUBLISHERS



r



;,)



PROPRIETOR! ^°^ is the

TIME TO ADVER-
TISE IN THE BUSINESS EDUCATOR
FOR A TEACHER FOR NEXT SCHOOL
YEAR

TEACHER! ^^'^ '= ''"^ ^'^^

^ - TO ADVERTISE IN
THE BUSINESS EDUCATOR FOR A
POSITION THIS FALL.



GOLUMBUS

GHTO.^



•a



,^^^u^n^4^^(/iu^i^^ ^




BUSINESS STSTEMI




Joosejeafjedger




^liss System and
Business System



While attending The National Convention of Busi-
ness Educators in Pittsburg:, it was our privilege to listen
to several very excellent papers, on the advisability of
introducing Business System in the shape of modern
office and labor saving appliances into the Office Prac-
tice Department of the up-to-date business school.

These papers were very interesting and should have
been heard by every member of the federation instead
of the few who were in attendance at the business
teachers' section.

The fact that one of these papers was read by a
wide-awake Business College man was a straw in our
favor. We have been advocating this innovation for
several years, in our advertisements on this page.

The Bliss System is the only system published to-
day which requires an Office Practice Department large
enough to take in the Adding Machine, the Billing
Machine, the Loose Leaf Ledger, the Card Ledger and
the hundred and one Business System appliances now in
use, and make practical use of same in connection with
Actual Business transactions. Get in line and introduce
Bliss System and Business System this year.

The F. H. Bliss Pub. Co.

SsLginaiv, Mich.



BLISS SYSTEMS



(^ ^^t^ttiii^l^^a-ni^*^jSe/^^ijAj:i^U^ft^/il/i4^z^nyt'/y^'t^-^^ X. J



^^^^Su^^/n^ii^/^f/iUYi&T ^



* * 20th CE NT VR Y
BOOKKEEPING ''



A. STANDAR33 SYSXEBS

of bookkeeping for use in

all schools that teach

this subject.

Complimentary Teachers' Outfit sent to any

commercial teachers or school

proprietors upon request

A.DDR.C8S



Depositories in all leading cities



THE inOSSELPII PUBLieHTIOIIS



Business Letter Writing — One of the neatest
and brightest little works on Commercial Cor-
respondence. Unlike anything else published.
Write for sample pages. Single copy sent
postpaid for 50 cents.



NEW COMMERCIAL ARITHMETIC



A book of 479 pages, thoroughly covering the
subject. Copy sent postpaid for $2.00.

Practical Bookkeeping, Commercial Law,
High School Bookkeeping, Business Speller

Try a box of Miisselman's Perfection Pens,
25 cents. For full information and sample
pages, write



D.l.



aUINCY. IL.LINOIS



CHARTICR SHORTHAND

What others have learned by experience. It pays to investigate.



" Chartier Shorthand is far superior to any other system
we have ever used." BROWN'S BUSINESS COLLEGE, LIN-
COLN, NEB.

"There is nothing to equal Chartier Shorthand." MAC-
Chesney Business College, Patterson, N. J.

" It is tlie greatest system ever published." BLISS BUSI-
NESS College, Columbus, o.

" With Chartier Shorthand students save so much time
for other things. It is great." BEUTEL BUSINESS COLLEGE,
Tacoma, Wash.

" We formerly taught Pitman and Gregg. About six
months ago we started six students on Chartier. To-day we
are teaciiing it almost exclusively." ACME BUSINESS COL-
LEGE, Seattle, wash.

" We tliink Chartier Shorthand the greatest system ever
devised." WESTERN SCHOOL OF COMMERCE, STOCKTON,
CALIFORNIA.



" After thoroughly investigating Chartier Shorthand, we
discarded both Pitman and Gregg." METROPOLITAN BUSI-
NESS College, Dallas, Texas.

" Chartier Shorthand saves ao much time for other things
and therein its greatest beauty lies." PORTLAND BUSINESS
College, Portland, Ore.

"There is nothing like Chartier Shorthand for ease in
learning and rapidity in writing. Its reading power is sottie-
thing wonderful." RUBICAM SHORTHAND SCHOOL, ST.
LOUIS, MO.

" It is a wonderful syf-tem of Shorthand." MILES BUSI-
NESS COLLEGE, DETROIT, MICH.

" We have displaced Pitman for Chartier." DAVIS BUSI-
NESS College, Toledo, ( )hio.

" It is so simple that a child can learn it. It has equally
as great advantages from the speed point of view as other
standard systems." EASTMAN BUSINESS COLLEGE. Pough-
KEBPSIE, N. Y.



"Behnke- Walker Business College of Portland, Oregon, experimented with the system last spring by teaching
a class in it. This convinced them and their initial order was for five hundred books.



Mr. E M. Chartii



ilh the Charlii



Publishing Co.



CHARTIER. SPENCER PUBLISHING CO.



S. C. SCMWING. Sec.-Tre»s.



NEW ORI^EANS, L,A.



L. C. SPENCER. Pres.



^_J^ .^A^ifr»/i.le Li^,an^-^j^tj(iaJ^elJcii'c/lf../i^4znj£^^^u^'.^r/7?z^



.^^^u*^/n^d^y^(/u^Yi/fi^ ^



The Benn Pitman System

Of Phonography is the National American Standard
of Shorthand Instruction and Practise.

Taught in the Public High Schools of 24 out of the 37
Cities of the first class (lOO,00O population and over)
in the United States.

[Scud for our selected list of Public High Schools).

Taught in more Private Commercial Schools than all
non-Pitmanic systems combined.

(Send for ,,ur ><;lcile,l list .,f Coiiuncrcial Schools].

Taught in a majority of the Catholic Parochial and Insti-
tutional Schools that teach Shorthand.

|Send for our selected list of Catholic Schools],

Used by the Official Reporters of Debates of the United
States Congress.

Used by two-thirds of the Shorthand Clerks holding Civil
Service positions under the United States Govern-
ment

Used by a majority of the Official Shorthand Reporters
in the State and Federal Courts.

Published by

The Phonographic Institute Company,
Cincinnati, Ohio.

BENN PITMAN, President.
JEROME B. HOWARD, Manager.



MAIL COURSE IN



HIGHER ACCOyNTING



CONDUCTED BY



R.J.BEl[TLC.iC.P.A.

Member American Association of Public Accounlanls
Principal Detroit Business University

ASSISTED BY A STAFF OF
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS AND LAWYERS



TH E Course will consist of 25 carefully graded
lessons in Theory of Account*, Auditing,
Practical Accountlni;, and Business Law prepared
especially for candidates for the degree of CERTI-
FIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT, and for those who
wish to qualify as accountants.

The entire Course is under the direct supervision
of Mr. Bennett, Accountant, Author and Teacher,
whose counsel and advice may be had at all times.
We guarantee satisfaction, promptness, and careful
attention to all work, and reasonable rates. Special
attention given to commercial teachers.

Send for circular giving full information and an
outline of the lessons to

K. J. Bennett, C. P. A.,

15 Wileo.N Street, Detroit, Miet».



(|)(|)®(|)\(|)®(|)®0®

® ® © ® (iX®'® ®"®®'
®©(5)®©w®®®©

©©® ©■®"(iX®® © ©■





THt VAN SANT SYSTEM OF TOUCH TYPEWRITING



Tht



at brings I



brings accuracy combined with speed.
The system that has furnished the greatest number of expert typew

operators at the great expositions in this and foreign lands d

the past ten years.
The system that has revolutionized the typewriting of the world.
The system that is easiest to leach, and easiest to learn, and that i

most efficient when learned.
Published in pamphlet form for the Remington. Smith Premier. Ol

L. C. Smith Brothers. Visible, the Monarch Visible, the Underv

Visible, and the Fox. All of the above have 42 pages.
The system is also published hi chart form — 34 pages.
Price in either form 50 cents, with usual discount to schools.
In ordering state for what machine, and whether desired in cha

pamphlet form. Orders may be sent to
A. C. VAN SANT, GOODYEAR-MAR8HALL PUBLISHING CO ,



Gillotfs Pens



The Most Perfect of Pens



PRINCIPALITY PEN, No. 1

^_-*fflEJI|lll>J IIIIWI J u i t K H JJIlilk

teZl ^ ° CULOTTS I

^~~""Mniiiii'f'iifi^iTl'""'r "W
VICTORIA PEN, No. 303



DOUBLE ELASTIC PEN, No. 604 E. F




Gilloll's Pens Gillolt's Pens have for seventy-five years
stood the most exacting testa at the hands of Professional
and Business Penmen. Extensively imitated, but never
epualled. GilUtt's P«n« still stand in the front rank, as
reearda Temper, Elasticity and Durability.

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS

Joseph Gilloii ^ Sons

ALFRED FIELD <& CO.. Sole Agents
93 Chambers St. NEW YORK



\^_J^ ^<^l^l-/:e'ieLi'yc^^^t^^^^i^iiS.u{e^i^M,■e:^,^4^n^ 30



^^^3Bu^i/neiU/^/^u^a^ ^



A N C I C N T !



-^o



u^ . r - X ,^<~.^ f












7 - -7.



/S . • I



J



r









'V



yA






K



)



^. (



■r-



->-.- V



Ancient Features.



1. Nothing in common with longhand;
awkward strokes and obtuse angles plentiful.

2. Consonants distinguished by light and
heavy strokes— an uncertain method.

.3. Written above, on and through the
line— an unnatural vowel scheme.

4. Hard to write.

5. Vowels detached ; must be omitted in
rapid work.

6. Hard to read ; absence of vowels and
difficulties of shading and position writing
tend to illegibility.

7. Brevity secured only by a host of con-
flicting rules with numerous exceptions.

8. Many ways of writing almost every
word.

9. Difficult angles predominate.
10. Hard to learn.



M O D C R N !



Modern Features.



1. Based on longhand with its easy
strokes and uniform slant.

2. No compulsory shading.

.3. Position writing abolished.

4. Easy to write, hence capable of high
rate of speed.

5. Vowels joined in the order in which
they occur.

6. Easy to read because of presence of
vowels.

7. Brevity secured by application of
natural principles.

8. Practically only one way of writing
oach word.

;). Angles rare; curves predominate.
10. Easy to learn.



Of ^ ^i-



2^



-^



. J- — • ^'^-' J-



^-.



r



WHicK Do Yotu Prefer ?

"To have been first proves mitimiity : To have become first proves merit!"
" Gregff .Shorthand is based on scientific principles, applied in a scientific wav,

and I believe that it is destined to become the shorthand of the English

speaking people."— Gu27/jer< Pitman.
Send for a copy of "Shorthand Contests" and our proposition.

THE GREGG PUBLISHING CO.



New York.



Chicago



(^ ^^ti?^e^UeAeA^i^.a^fui6^-!^i^^<£i/ie^^^^i'C4(iil/^^ ■^^.uA^^f^^iJdy G>^a(e.ic^!.^tn' y^ J



.^^^u4/ned4/^aiu^aifT- ^



Just from the Press and

What You Have Been

Waiting For.

Style Book of

Business English

Time and again the teaching of practical
English has been attempted and aban-
doned in commercial courses on account
of its meagre results, and all foi* the
lack of a proper text-book. This

work is designed to overcome that
difficulty. It is not intended to be ex

haustive, but has for its purpose the
object of correcting many of the
defects in English made by begin-
ners in correspondence and type-
writing. Numerous tests given to
pupils on entering commercial courses
showed a deficiency of about fifty per
cent., and on finishing the course about
fortv per cent, of the information given
in this work, although it contains only
the absolutely essential. Many books
have been designed with the same object
in view, but none have been presented
in a manner to be of practical service in
commercial courses, except as a special
course and with a special teacher. Ex-
perimental instruction in business Eng-
lish, hitherto given without a special
teacher, has always been comparatively
unproductive, the time proving to be
more profitable when applied to short-
hand, typewriting, etc. Hence, this
automatic method, which requires

practically no extra time in direct
instruction and dispenses entire-
ly with the special teacher.

Cloth, 127 Pages, Price, 60 Cents.

Rxamioation Copy <o Te»cKcr» 40c. Mention achool.

Specimen Pages sent on request.



Adopted bv the High Schools of New York,
Brooklyn and other leading cities



ISAAC PITMAN SHORTHAND

Formerly "Short Course in Shorthand. "



SPECIAL FEATURES :

'' Short Lessons, simply graded — no di.fcourage-
ment.

^ Words and sentences introduced in the first
lesson.

T Business Letters introduced in the seventh
lesson.

1] Position Writing from the commencement.

1[ Phrases taught from the fifth lesson.

^ Reporting Stvle taught from the commence-
ment.

T Finality of Outline — no form introduced before
the principle governing it has liecn cvplaincd.



Revolutionizing tlie Teacfiing
of SItortltand.

WHAT A WELL KNOWN TEACHER SAYS:

"The revised and enlarged edition of 'Short
Course' will meet with the hearty approval of
every teacher and will be welcomed !)y pupils.
The chapter on Speed Practice, the lists of
phraseogramsand tables of the alphabet, vowels
and double consonants, the fittythree graded
and hyphenated business letters and other drill
exercises contained in the pages added to 'Short
Course'— these additions make the road to aman-
uensis speed comparatively easy for the student
who has mastered the principles contained in
the forty fascinating lessons. In saying that
the revised book now entitled "Course in Isaac
Pitman Shorthand' is the most practical, peda-
gogical shorthand text published, I believe I
merely express what hundreds of others have
already said. In changing about one hundred
and fifty High School pupils from a Pitmanic
modification to Isaac Pitman Shorthand as pre-
sented in 'Short Course,' I have not heard a
single objection or complaint from pupils and
school authorities, nor have I met with any dis-
couragement from pupils. The reason is ob-
vious: Each lesson is complete in itself. The
pedagogical presentation of a few principles at
a time, together with copious lists of words,
sentences and letters illustrating these princi-
ples, and no other principles not previously
explained, and the fact that outlines are given
first in their briefest practical form (and never
changed), make the learning of shorthand fifty
per cent, easier than any other methotl I have
ever seen in any book. Your book is revolu-
tionizing the teaching of shorthand."

—E. H. CRA VER. Instructor in Shorthand.
Paterson N. J.) High School.

Cloth, gilt lettering, 241 pp. $1.50. Liberal
discount to schools and teachers.

Send tor particulars of a special course
to Teachers, copy of "Which System,"
"Speed Contests" and "Pitman's Journal."



L



ISAAC PlTMAiy/ & Sons, 3/ Umon square, ^ew York

I "Practical Course in Touch Typewriting," SOc.
PUBLISHERS OF "Cumulative Speller and Shorthand Vocabulary," 75c.
I "Taquigrafia Espanola de Isaac Pitman," $1.25.



\JX^ ■-•»^^Wi^ifc^^^J><^^/>^<^^\-,jifc^^^k»^^^^^^^^.^^t:^^£«^'6^ jCj




VOLUME XIII.



COLUMBUS, O., APRIL, 1908.



NUMBER VIII.



THE BUSINESS EDUCATOR

Entered at Columbu?.0.. Host Office as 2nd Class Mati



E. W Bl



Editor
Business Manager



Published Monthly (except July and August) by
Zaner & Bloseb, 118 N. Hish St.. Columbus. O.. as
follows : Teachers' Professional Edition, fl .0(1 a
Year (Foreign Subscriptions 30 cents extra; Cana-
dian Subscriptions, 30 cents extra). Students' Pen-
manship Edition. 7."i cents a Year (Foreign Sub-
'0 cents extra; Canadian Subscriptions,



10 c



Keir


Itta


nces


should


be


made


by Money Order


or Ba


Ik IJ


raft.


or by c


irrency


at sender's risk.


Stamps acce


pted


If per


so


al che


cks are sent, add


20cen


sfor


collec


tion fee









'I'he Teachers' Professional
contains 48 or ra»re pages, twelve pages of
re devoted to Accounting. Finance. Mathe-
English. Law, Typewriting. Advertisingt
ntions, etc , and Departments specially suited
needs of teachers, principals and proprietors.
Students' Penmanship Edition contains 36
e same as the Professional Edition,
less the twelve pages devoted to commercial sub-
jects. This edition is specially suited to students in
Commercial. Public and Private schools, and con-
tains all of the Penmanship, Engrossing, Pen Art,
and Lesson features of the Professional Edition.



Two EdlH.

Edition contain
which E



to the



pages ;



) the pro-



j of bus



The Basiness Educator is

gressive and practical interests c
tion and Penmanship. A journa
to dignify, popularize, and ini]
newest and neediest education,
spire and instruct both pupil ai
further the interests of those en
in private as well as in public i
ness education.

Cbange of Address. If you change your ad-
dress, be sure to notify us promptly (in advance, if
possible), and be careful to give the old as well as
the new address. We lose many journals each issue
through negligence on the part of subscribers.

Back numbers cannot, as a rule, be supplied.

Postmasters are not allowed to forward journals
unless postage is sent to them for that purpose.



Sabs


■ribers. If we do not acknowledge receipt


of your


subscription, kindly consider first copy of


the jour


nal you receive as sufficient evidence that


we rece


ved your subscription all right If you do


not rece


ive your journal by the 10th of each month,



please notify i

Advertising Rates furnished upon application.
The Business EniiCATOR being the highest grade
journal of its class is purchased and read by the
most intelligent and well-to-do among those inter-
ested in business education and penmanship in the
United States. Canada, England, and nearly every
country on the globe It circulates, not alone among
business college proprietors, teachers and pupils,
but also among principals of commercial depart-
ments of High Schools, Colleges and Religious
Schools, as well as among office workers, home
students, etc.

Rate.s to Teachers, A§ent». and Club
Raisers sent upon application. Write for them
whether you are in a position to send few or many
subscriptions. ^Sample'.copies furnished to secure
subscriptions.




Co Robert e. Spencer

There runs an olden legend of a friar, cowled and suited.
Condemned to wander immemorially in mournful pain.
Because he sought with love of humankind to lighten all the strain
The world lays on our hearts; but 1 have heard it more than mooted
That the angels, spite recall that their Gabriel loudly tooted,
Bustled, hustled hellward toward the inusic of a fountain.
Where his laughter rolled and gleamed; the only thing to do,

'twas plain,
Was to send him up on high; so was Paradise recruited.

It hideth in my memory like a fantasy of dreams.

More than vivid through the magic of a modern make of mirth,

That somewhere I've met auother stepping lightly on the earth,

Uncowled with joy and jubilantly flinging flashing gleams

Of wit where sorrow sat supreme; we followed where the echoes led.

Lost the pain of life and found a paradise of earth instead.

— Melvin Cassmore.



^^i^^iO/n^d^^f/iu^i^h- S



Proprietor, Principal, Ceacber.

If you will look through the adver-
tising columns of The Business Edu-
cator, you will note, from month to
month, a good many advertisements
of proprietors and principals seeking
teachers, and likewise a good many
notices from teachers seeking posi-
tions. Most of these advertisements
are over a nomdeplume.

This, is unquestionably the cheap-
est and quickest way of securing a
teacher or position. The reason is
easy to find : the leading proprietors,
principals and teachers are subscrib-
ers to and readers of The Business
Educator.

By the use of the nomdeplume, se-
crecy is secured and publicity is at-
tained at the same time— two very im-
portant things indeed; /a'o things not
possible in any other way.

Many of the best school bargains
are made in this manner at the mini-
mum of expense and many of the
best teachers and positions are thus
secured, the interested parties alone
knowing of the transactions until
contracts are completed.

.\ rightly worded advertisement
brings only desirable replies— the en-
tire unemployed population is not
turned loose upon you, and where the
nomdeplume is employed, no reply
is necessary if the person or the posi-
tion is not as desired.

Let The Business Educator ad-
vertising columns serve you cheaply,
silently, successfully and honorably.
Rates made known upon application.
Absolute secrecy at the Columbus
end of the line.

J1 Crip Southward in Ulintcr

The last of January, business beck-
oned the editor to Texas through
Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, Ala-
bama, Mississippi and Louisiana.
Passing through the land of Boone
and Jackson by night, we arrived on
the borderland of the old South, Chat-
tanooga, the historic battlefield, by
dawn, from which this sketch begins.

I found the climate mild, at times
balmy; the landscape aspect dull and
gray and brown, with bright patches
of yellow, orange and red clay. Pine
and oak-denuded forests were every-
where to be seen, with a wastefulness
of nature's bounty known only to
primitive and pioneer communities.
What the war failed to do, the ax and
fire are now doing, leaving behind
desolated wildernesses of brush and
stumps and waste timbers.

One-horse plows, drawn by diminu-
tive, ill-fed and poorly kept horses
and mules; ox-teams and the crudest
harness and vehicles I have ever seen;
oxen and cows, high in hip and long
of horn and hair, were the rule rather
than the exception.

These were driven by negroes or
poor whites. The latter are unedu-



cated, unprogressive and apparently
a thousand years behind the times.
However, here and there modern
methods and machinery were to be
seen, and intelligent people were stir-
ing into activity latent energies and
developing boundless resources.

Undeveloped rather than pictur-
esque describes the condition south-
ward through Alabama and Missis-
sippi. Rich in the natural resources of
soil and sunshine, lumber and cotton,
coal and iron, it is the coming land of
promise and perpetual plenty.

Through Mississippi and Louisiana,
I "sure did see lots o' cotton and cane
country.'' This was cultivated in a
far more extensive and progressive
manner, revealing more of the pros-
perity which characterized "the
South befo' the war."

Windowless, sometimes even door-
less shanties served for negro homes,
and are equaled only by the most
squalid quarters sometimes discover-
ed in our northern cities occupied by
out-casts and unfortunates who for-
age among the city's refuse.

From New Orleans westward we
passed through many mammoth cane-



Online LibraryFrank OvertonThe Business Educator (Volume 13) → online text (page 62 of 89)