Copyright
Frank Overton.

The Business Educator (Volume 17) online

. (page 59 of 97)
Online LibraryFrank OvertonThe Business Educator (Volume 17) → online text (page 59 of 97)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


If it isn't the best meeting of the kind ever held we will miss our guess.
And if it doesn't prove to be the pleasantest, most interesting, most eujoyable,
and most profitable trip commercial teachers have ever taken we agree to print a
"retraction " in big type.



nc



1U3L



3CZJC



DC



DC



DC



DC



It.



■JV^ff l H,al!J/^ l |^l^,^Jll■l l M l |»^l^NlJ l llfl l ll l l l^^^ll l il^ilI aafflIai



<3^3$uAtneM&/iUMlfr %




Talks by

Miss Remington:




Do You Know That



Three-Quarters of a Million

Remington Typewriters are in use today — more than
any other make, and more than many others combined?

There are many reasons why it pays best to learn
the Remington, but this reason — the Three-Quarters of
a Million reason — includes all the others.

The Remington is the typewriter in widest use,
therefore the principal demand is always for Remington
operators.

Remington Typewriter Company

(Incorporated)

New York and Everywhere




rj | i iiMni"j,'i;^iiN,f,inii,H l it;^ic!ini;i,rjiii l ^i,'i-i'H'iTn^m^M



•Mt-3(Jt*jt/imCdutuf<7- %



t "N

The World's Records

for Accuracy in Shorthand

at High Speed

THE World's Records for accur-
acy on solid matter at high
speed are held by writers of
Gregg Shorthand.

In the Shorthand Speed Contests
of the National Shorthand Reporters'
Association at Buffalo, August, 1911,
Mr. Charles L. Swem, a boy of eigh-
teen, established a new world's rec-
ord on solid matter at 170 words per
minute — 99.6% perfect. Mr. Swem's
record was made in competition with
the most expert writers of the world
— the world's champions for 1909 and
mr. c. l. swem 1910, the permanent winner of the miss s. l. tarr

Eagan Trophy and three times world's champion, all court reporters of from six to twenty years' experience.
In the Fifth International Shorthand Speed Contest at Washington, 1910, Miss S. L. Tarr, a girl of
seventeen, won third place and established a world's record for accuracy on difficult solid matter — 9!>.4"<.
perfect. First and second places were won by writers of Gregg Shorthand.

In the Championship contest at Buffalo, Mr. Swem exceeded the previous world's record on jury
charge by ten words per minute, writing 237 words net per minute for five minutes.

Both Mr. Swem and Miss Tarr, who have had but three years' experience, are writers of

Gregg Shorthand

These are the records of a young man and a young woman of the age of those in your
school. We ask you, as a practical schoolman, to consider the significance of that fact.
Such records made by experienced, seasoned reporters — remarkable as they would be — would
not appeal to those whom you wish to reach as being at all remarkable. They would be
looked upou as a matter of course. But the records of Mr. Swem, Miss Tarr, and Miss
Werning are dramatic in effect, arouse a strong human interest. They possess an adver-
tising value that the wise schoolman is taking advantage of. These are factors that are
of importance to you, independent of the demonstrated superiority of Gregg Shorthand.

ASK FOR BOOKLET B. E. 12.

The Gregg Publishing Company





New York



Chicago



■i'hiiniUJii'i^.^i.it i JiriiiiiHiii'i-ii^iivyiitfj.iiJt^ii-i'ts siEamzai



^7t^3StsJ//i{JS &//ua/<r &



THE PRIZE WINNERS IN THE SEVEN INTERNA-
TIONAL SHORTHAND SPEED CONTESTS



Time and
Place


Contestants


System


Matter Read.


o «J
Vg 3 u

167


E
o

w

16


o
C £

98.1


O.TT
Pi

i- =<*

** c "

150


c



;
1


Awards


April 14th, 1906,
at Baltimore


Sidney H. Godfrey,
of London, Eng.


Isaac Pitman


Newspaper


Miner Medal


Mar. 30th, 1907,
at Boston


Nellie M. Wood, of

Boston. .Mass.
Sidney H. Godfrey,

of London, Eng.'


Isaac Pitman
Isaac Pitman


Judge's Charge
Newspaper


225
165


45
31


90
96.25


163
123


1
4


Eagan Cup
Miner Medal


April 18th, L908,

at Philadelphia


Nellie M.Wood, of
Boston, Mass.

C. H. Marshall, of
Chicago, 111.


Isaac Pitman

Pitmanic


Testimony
Testimony


260
260


21
54


98.4
95.8


253

242


1
3


Eagan Cup
Miner Medal


April 10th, 1909,
at Providence


Nellie M. Wood, of
Boston, Mass.


Isaac Pitman


Judge's Charge
Testimony


240

277


65
65


94.6
95.3


227
264


1


Eagan Cup permanently and
World's Speed Record


Aug. 24th. 1909,
at Lake George


Willard B. Bottome,
of New York


Pitmanic


Speech
Testimony


207
280


12

78


98.8
94.3


205
262


1


Shorthand Writer Cup and
Title " Champion Shorthand
Writer of the World"


Aug. 23rd. 1910,
at Denver


Clyde H. Marshall,
of Brooklyn


Pitmanic


Speech

Judge's Charge

Testimony


200
240
280


39

s:,


96.11
92.91
95.58


192.6

222.8
268


1


Shorthand Writer Cup and
Title "Champion Shorthand
Writer of the World"


Aug. 28th, 1911,

at Buffalo


,Nellie M. Wood.
/ of Boston

1 Nathan Behrin. of
New ^ ork


Isaac Pitman
Isaac Pitman


Sermon

Speech

Judge's Charge

Testimony

Speech

Judge's Charge

Testimony


150
170
190
210

200
240
280


4

5
2

7

18
40
60


99.47
99.41
99.79
99.33

98.2

90.H0
95.71


149.2
169
189.6
208.6

196.4

232

268


1

1


Adam's Accuracy Trophv per-
manently

Shorthand Writer Cup and
Title " Champion Shorthand
Writer of the World "



Typewriting
Results That Count

Over 100 Net Words a Minute in less than 20 Months

In September, 1909, Miss Bessie Friedman, who was then but fourteen years of age, began the study of typewriting
from A PRACTICAL COURSE IN TOUCH TYPEWRITING. On October 25. 1910, she took part in the
World's Novice Championship held at Madison Square Garden and succeeded in writing at the rate of 81 net words a min-
ute for 15 minutes thus beating the best previous World's Novice Record by 8 net words a minute. Then, on April 22, 1911,
just to show that she possesses THE KIND OF SPEED THAT GETS RESULTS, Miss Friedman won the Type-
writing Championship of New York Citv. writing OVER 100 NET WORDS A MINUTE for 15 minutes. MISS
FRIEDMAN IS THE ONLY AMATEUR TYPIST WITH A COMPETITION RECORD OF OVER 100
NET WORDS A MINUTE Read her opinion of A Practical Course in Touch Typewriting.

" The exercises in 'A Practical Course in Touch Typewriting' are carefully graded, and so arranged that one makes
rapid progress and overcomes difficulties almost without being conscious of them. I believe the methods employed
produce the very best results that can be desired. In my own case I was able to win two championships, writing in
competition over 100 net words a minute in less than twenty months from the time I first began the study of Type-
writing. I heartly recommend 'A Practical Course ' to all who wish to thoroughly master touch typewriting, and
are looking for a text-book which gives the right start."— Bessie Friedman.

THE REASON

A PRACTICAL COURSE IN TOUCH TYPEWRITING produces winners is because it is the most constructive
system in typewriting ever devised. It follows the line of least resistance, so that the student becomes a skillful operator
with a minimum amount of effort. IT TRAINS ALL THE FINGERS ALL THE TIME. The fingers are trained
first on those keys over which they are naturally held when in their normal position. IT IS SCIENTIFICALLY AND
PEDAGOGICALLY CORRECT.

NOW READY

Tenth Edition Entirely Reset, Revised and Improved and Printed from New Plates.

Stiff Paper Covers, 50c. : Cloth, 75c. Teachers' examination copy, postpaid, 34c. and 50c. respectively. Mention schools.
Adopted by the New York and Boston High Schools.

ISAAC PITMAN ® SONS, 2 West 45th SU NEW YORK

86?"Send for Particulars of a Free Correspondence Course in Isaac Pitman Shorthand for Teachers



tEMmmmmEMmsm^Mmsmmmsma



HO

M9&




mm^mmm




^^■.-av.':'. ■::<...-.■'. -.t..'-.^:' .:."•,'■ '..v^:...,,-^,..,.



aaa iaa ta aB Bi ES



_^



! HENDEEflGN— N.T-



VOLUME XVII



COLUMBUS, O., MARCH, 1912



NUMBER VII



THE BUSINESS EDUCATOR

Entered »t Columbus, . , Post Office as 2nd Class 11 atter



E. W. Blose*,



Editor
Business Manager



Published Monthly (except July and August) by
Zaner & Bloser. 118 N. High St., Columbus, O , as
follows : Teachers' Professional Edition, $100 i
Year (Foreign Subscriptions 30 cents extra : Cana-
dian Subscriptions 20 cents extra). Students' Pen-
manship Edition, 75 cents a Year (Foreign Sub-
scriptions 20 cents extra : Canadian Subscriptions
10 cents extra.)

Remittances should be made by Money Order
or Bank Draft, or by currency at sender's risk.
Stamps accepted. If personal checks are sent, add
20 cents for collection fee.

Two Editions. The Teachers' Professional
Edition contains 48 or more pages, twelve pages of
which are devoted to Accounting, Finance, Mathe-
matics, English, Law, Typewriting, Advertising,
Conventious, etc., and Departments specially suited
to the needs of teachers, principals and proprietors

The Students' Penmanship Edition contains 36
pages and is the same as the Professional Edition,
less the twelve pages devoted to commercial sub-
jects. This edition is specially suited to students in
Commercial, Public and Private schools, and con-
tains all of the Penmanship, Engrossing, Pen Art,
and Lesson features of the Professional Edition.



The Business Educator is d

gressive and practical interest



oted



l and Pe

to dignify, popul
newest and needi
spire and instruci
further the i
in private as
ness educati



f Bl .._.
, .-.jrnal whose mission is
rize, and improve the world's
-.wSt education. It purposes to in-
lct both pupil and teacher, and to
rests of those engaged in the work,
11 as in public institutions of busi-



Chan&e of Address, If you change your ad-
dress, be sure to notify us promptly (in advance fc if
possible), and be careful to give the old



unle



i postage



We lose many journals each issue
ice on the part of subscribers,
cannot, as arule.be supplied,
re not allowed to forward journals
; sent to them for that purpose.



ATTENTION

To all Contestants of the

$100 CONTEST $100

Contest No. 1. It iscoming along fine. \V.
H. Moore, Mogadore, Ohio, seems to be in the
lead just now— with many Professional Penmen
and Fine Writers giving him a "merry chase."

Contest No. 2. Many excellent pages receiv-
ed. REMEMBER: The best work received be-
fore June 20 wins the SIO bill. Will you?

Contest No. 3. It is too late now to enter in
this contest. At least 200 are in the race for
"this particular bill."

Contest No. 4. Wake up! You Supervisors
of Writing are slow. Hurry !

Contest No. 5. Porto Rico looms up as a
probable winner— but just wait until the last
round, June 20, and may be Hawaii will come in
first.

Contest No. 6. Ah, don't let it scare you.
Some photographers have good machines now-
adays. Send in the affirmative or the negative.

Contest No. 7. This is the most popular con-
test so far. When sending in work, please sav
if it is to be entered in one or more of the con-
tests or to be criticised and returned.

Contest No. 8. Say! You big club raiser
you. Wish you'd tell how you manage to
catch so many fish at one time. They say that
confession is good for the soul. Better fess up.

Contest No. 9. Try it! (Think of Bryan «
And what's better advertising than good photo-
graphs nowdays. Mr. Schoolman : Are you
thinking about your next year's catalog ?

Contest No. 10. Hit 'em hard. Letters of this
nature are welcomed from all sections of the
country— and not the "thank you— 1 congratulate
you kind."

Fred Berkman. Lincoln, Neb.,
Author and Contributor of Contests.



A Generous Tribute from a Discrim-
inating Critic.



Allentown, Pa., Nov 21st, 1911.
Messrs. Zaner & Bloser Co.
Columbus, Ohio.

Oentlemen— Simply a word to acknowledge
receipt of "The Madarasz Book" which, from
the view point of the artist, editor and printer
makes it easily the finest addition to penman-
ship literature that has been issued during the
past decade. In fact I doubt if anything in the
way of script, that is par excellence, all the way
through, pertaining to representing almost ex-
clusively the work of but one penman, has ever
been produced to equal this, and it is needless
to say, therefore, that no penman's library will,
or can be, complete without this book.

I prize it very highly, not only because of the
rare skill of the artist but also because of the
other good qualities of the man. The editors and
publishers, however, also deserve to be con-
gratulated for the attractive manner in which
this work was gotten up, the splendid tribute
paid the arlist, and the simple form in which the
history of Madarasz is presented by them, as
well as for the great amount of general informa-
tion it contains and which is usually interesting
a"d inspiring. For these reasons 1 take pleas-
ure in giving this volume one of the most prom-
inent places in my library.

With my best personal wishes for an unprece-
dented sale of this book, which it richly de-
serves, I am,

Very sincerely yours,
The American Commercial School.
Per O. C. Dorney, C. P. A. Pres.



Subscribers. If we do not acknowledge receipt
of your subscription, kindly consider first copy of
the journal you receive as sufficient evidence that
we received your subscription all right. If you do
not receive your journal by the 10th of each month,
please notify us.

Advertising Rates furnished upon application.
The Business Educator being the highest grade
journal of its class is purchased and read by the
most intelligent and well-to-do among those inter-
ested in business education arid penmanship in the
United States, Canada, England, and nearly every
country on the globe It circulates, not alone among
business college proprietors, teachers and pupils,
but also among principals of commercial depart-
ments of High Schools, Colleges and Religious
Schools, as well as among office workers, home
students, etc.

Rates to Teachers, Agents, and Club
Raiser* sent upon application. Write for them
whether you are in a position to send few or many
subscriptions. Sample copies furnished to secure
subscriptions.



THE EASTERN COMMERCIAL TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION

Albany, N. Y., April 4, 5, 6, 1912,

Promises to be up to the average of its many very excellent
predecessors, which means that it will be more than worth
your while to attend. The program as outlined in the Pro-
fessional Edition of The Business Educator is an excellent
one, and will more than repay attendance. Then there is the
"Social Side" which is always worth more than the program,
so you are sure to congratulate yoursely that you attended,
or regret it if you do not go.

"Meet me at Albany"



&ie<36u4/ned^4&uxi^ &



1 — II- -■ II


— ii 1. „ „ .I

GOLD BRICKS


■■


i mfc4


CHAS. T. C BAG IN,


D


j >XF


Prln. Thompson's Business Institute, Molyoke, Mass.

1! ii II — II II






THE STORY OF A BRICK

Silas Skinner had just sold his farm. It was a
good farm and Skinner had made considerable
money during his sixty years of life. He had
sold everything under heavens that anybody
would buy, and lived on what the poor neigh-
bors would not steal. Whenever he got a cent
he sat on it and didn't let it get away from him.
He worked himself and his wife and his children
and his horses from early in the morning until
late at night, and everybody that lives on that
plan can get rich.

Skinner had received nine thousand dollars in
cash for the farm and had deposited it in a bank
at Springfield, and two days before the opening
of this "Story of a Brick" he held an auction and
had taken in about fifteen hundred dollars
more, which he had also taken over to Spring-
field, for Silas Skinner was too wise a man to
take any chances of robbers by keeping that
money in his own house.

There may be meaner men than a right down
mean New England Yankee but it is hard to
find them. A Scotch-Irishman is pretty close
but he is hospitable enough. A Jew in a trade
will skin vou alive, if he gets a chance, but the
Jew is lavish when he comes to entertain vou,
but a real New England Yankee of the Silas
Skinner type would get up in the middle of the
night and chase a mosquito all over a ten acre
swamp to get his hide and tallow.

There are few of his type, for the ordinary
New England Yankee is a shrewd but lovable
type of humanity.

Silas Skinner had decided to move to Spring-
field where he expected to go into business,
lending money. He had found a partner, a
"loan shark" with an established trade wno told
him there was big money in it, and there is.
For a man who borrows on chattel mortgage,
pays anywhere from five to twenty per cent, a
month according to how badly he needs the
money. It's a nice, safe business, too, much
safer than highway robbery when, after you
have taken a man's last cent and his shirt and
boots, you may get locked up for it, while in the
loan shark "biz" you don't run t hat risk and you
get his pell just the same. Some supersensitive
people think the business is not honorable but
the law allows it and, for my part, I think it is as
honorable as taking candy from a baby, or run
ning a business college that promises to teach
you shorthand in three months and get you a
position. True, large souled men are preju-
diced against either line of business but two
such souls as that of Silas could have had a six
day walking match on the point of a cambric
needle.

Silas had one piece of property left to dispose of,
a fine timber lot, lying three or four miles from
his family mansion, and on the morning of a
mild October day, there drove up to his house, a
modestly dressed, business-like looking man of
pleasant appearance and frank, honest counte-
nance. His hair was slightly grayed and his
hands showed evidence of the fact, that he, at
some time, had been a working man. He drove
a very good horse hitched to a democrat wagon
with a rather high back, and said, as he stopped
his horse in front of the veranda, "Is this Mr.
Skinner?" "That's my name," said Silas Skin-
ner. "You advertised a wood lot for sale, in the
Springfield Republican?" 'Yes sir." "Well
my name is Fletcher. I belong to the Fletcher
Lumber Company, of Hartford, and we are buy-
ing up anything we can get in the shape of
timber that can be brought to Hartford without
too much expense. How much woodland have
you?" "Well," said Silas, "there's about twenty-
two acres, most of it is old growth, pine, hem-
lock and spruce and there's a good lot of sugar



maple. I have tapped them trees for a good
many years in the Spring, but they would make
fine timber now."

"How much do you want for the wood lot?"
"Well I want all I can get," was the answer.
'Naturally," said Fletcher, "but I guess before
there is any use talking price I'd have to see
the property. "Yes, that's right." said Skinner,
"I don't really know what I'd ought to get for
that lot." "Well," said the lumber buyer, "it
don't take us long to make up our minds after
we see a wood lot what it is worth. Can vou
drive over there with me?" "Why yes, I reckon
so," was the answer, "will you drive me back
when we get through, it's two or three miles
over there?" "Of course," said Fletcher, and
Skinner went back into the house, got his coat
and the two drove off.

He was a pleasant talking man this Fletcher
and spoke interestingly of the big log drives
they had taken down the Connecticut in years
past and of logging in the far west, and they
finally came to the wood lot in question,
which was somewhat back from the highway.
They hitched the horse, after they had driven as
far as possible through the rough and rambling
country lane. At the lower end far from the
highway, there was situated a sugar house as
they call it in the maple sugar country and, to
the surprise of the owner, a thin line of smoke
was coming from the stovepipe of the old sugar
house.

"I wonder who in creation is in that sugar
house," said he. "I am pretty sure I locked that
up last spring when I went away from here and
there ain't anybody any business in there."
"Suppose we go down and see," said the lum-
ber buyer. 'Probably some boys in there, and,
likely as not they will set the place on fire if
we don't see to them The two men approach-
ed the sugar house rather stealthily. The door
was closed but not latched and Skinner softly
opening the door glanced upon a rather odd
specimen of humanity. He was an Indian, a
man of powerful frame perhaps forty-five or
fifty years old. His coarse black hair hung
thickly down over his shoulders, which were
covered by a gray flannel shirt with fringe trim-
mings, and he wore a pair of buckskin trousers
with bead trimmings around the ankles and a
serviceable pair of moccasins, while in the belt
around his waist, was strapped a Colt's revolver
and a hunting knife The man was smoking a
short pipe and had evidently been cooking for
there was a well defined odor of bacon, and a
frying pan sat on the rusty stove left in the sug-
ar house. There was a blanket hanging from a
peg on the wall and it was evident that the man
had slept there, for there was a good sized knap-
sack which lay on the ground under the blanket
for a pillow. The two visitors were immensely
surprised at the strange occupant of the sugar
house.

The Indian viewed with some distrust the
strangers who had broken in upon his solitude.
He moved warily over towards the knapsack
and blanket and significantly hitched up his
belt, which held the revolver and knife, and his
right hand strayed meaningly toward the six
shooter. He appeared able to speak but lit-
tle English and it required some time to impress
upon him the fact that he was on the property
of another person and had no business occupy-
ing the sugar house. Fletcher, the lumberman,
appeared able to talk with him much better than
Silas Skinner and finally said to Skinner, "By
Jove 1 I believe this fellow is more Mexican
than Indian. I used to talk that lingo when I
was in the West," and turning to the Indian he
said :

"Habla V Espanol" "Si Senor," came the
answer, instantly, and the two were soon eager-
ly talking in Spanish. After a conversation of



several minutes Fletcher said to Skinner, "This
is a queer thing, I am going to tell you what
this fellow says. It sounds fishy but it may be
so. He says he and a partner, whose name, he
says, is Bill Springer, have been down in Mexi-
co, just over the border, working a little mine
which he discovered. He is a Navajo Indian
and these Navajos are more than half Mexican,
and this language that he speaks is sort of Mex-
ican-Spanish. I learned it years ago when I
was in the lumber country of California and we
had Mexican help. He says they had to mine,
their claim on the slv because of Mexican and
Indian outlaws who robbed the miners and
everybody el6e in that part of the country. So
as fast as they got any gold they buried it, and
kept it out of sight as much as they could. They
had two other Indians working with them and
finally these two Indians tried to rob them, and
in the scrap that followed they killed the two
Indians. Knowing the friends of the Indians
would make trouble they melted their gold into
a sort of ingot-like, and put out of Mexico. It
seems that Springer came from around here and
they camped in the old shanty and he went up
to Springfield yesterday to see about selling the
gold, leaving the Indian in charge of it here,
and Springer has told him it is worth ten thous-
and dollars.

"Thunder!" said Fletcher, "Springer! where
have I heard that name? By gracious it was in
this morning's paper," and he pulled a copy of
a Springfield paper out of his pocket, and
glanced rapidly over its columns. "Here it is,"
and he read as Silas Skinner glanced over his
shoulder, "William Springer, that is his name,
judging from papers found in his pocket, was
instantly killed at the Union Depot in this city
yesterday at 2 p. m. He was crossing the track
between the Union Station and the old B. & M.
Station when a shift engine struck him, and he
was crushed to death under the wheels. Little
is known about Springer, but it is surmised from
papers found in his pockets that he was a miner
with relatives in (his part of the country. He
seems to be about forty-five years old and his
body was taken to the undertaking rooms of
John Flaherty, on Worthington St., where it
awaits the identification and claim on the part
of any relatives he may have in this vicinity.

"Well, what do you think of that ! wouldn't that



Online LibraryFrank OvertonThe Business Educator (Volume 17) → online text (page 59 of 97)