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movements— push-and-pull, round direct and
round indirect— to the same count and at the
same rate. The third and fourth fingers must
glide freely on the d.;sk in the three directions.
When practicing with the hand in a writing po-
sition in this way. the wrist must not touch the
desk or paper. Place the thumb against the
foretinger about at the first joint. The clothing
of the forearm should be loose so as to give free-
dom to the movement.

Step 4. Practice with the penholder In the
hand, but without Ink on the pen. Dry pen
practice is for the purpose of touching the pen
lightly to the paper, and at the same time it
gives correct movements for making the exer-
cises with ink. Movement exercises or letters
are the pictures or photographs of certain move-
ments. Therefore, if the movements with dry
pen are made correctly and brought under con-
trol, the exercise? or letters will represent good
pictures when Ink Is used. First practice the
push-and-pull movement to the count of one,
one, one, one ; or, down, down, down, down, at
the rate of 200 downward strokes per minute.
This count Is for the downward strokes only.
At this rate 500 counts should fill one line, two
spaces high, progressing slowly across the pa-
per. Two spaces Is between three blue lines.
Also practice one space which Is between two
blue lines. Important. In practicing the
push-and-pull movement, push and pull the pen
directly away from and toward the center of the
body. This determines the correct slant
for exercises and letters. The fingers must
not act ; they are used only for holding the pen -
holder. Also practice with dry pen the round
direct and the round indirect movements, pro-
gressing slowly across the paper to the count of
one, one, one, one : or. round, round, round,
round ; or, light, light, light, light ; at the rate
of 200 downward strokes or revolutions per
minute, and 500 counts filling a, line at this rate.
Also a good movement to practice with the dry
pen isthe over-and-back, or lateral movement,
gliding the pen lightly the full length of the



line to the count of over-back, over-back, over-
back : or, glide-back, glide-back, glide-back,
making the motion rapidly enough to admit of
an easy movement of the pen. In practicing
these movements, the wrist must he free
from the paper, Ihe third and fourth fingers
must glide freely, and the hand must be in a
standlng-up, working position.



FORM AND MOVEMENT SHOULD
TAUGHT TOGETHER.



BE



Success follows in the teaching of writing
when form and movement are combined. As a
rule It Is unwise to sacrifice one for the other.
There are times, however, when it Is well to em-
phasize form and there are times when It Is well
to emphasize movement, but the two should
never be entirely separated. The best results
are secured when simple, graceful forms are
practiced with simple, graceful movements.
Asfar as possible movement exercises, letters,
figures, words and sentences should be closely
connected, so as to insure both form and free-
dom In practice and all written work. In the
grading of writing both form and movement
should be considered. For example, form
might grade 95 per cent, and movement 75 per
cent. The true grade would therefore be 85
per cent.



In Business Writing, Ornamental Writing,
Engrossing Script and Lettering. Pen
Copies, Red Ink Criticism, Easy Payments,
Circular free. Address,



Amarillo, Texai



ENGRO SSING PRINTS. I have had en-
' graved six of

my most elaborately engrossed Resolutions
and Memorials, prints of which (6x9
inches) I am pleased to ofifer postpaid for
25 cents.



P. W. COSTELLO.



Scranton, P&..





THE



lyceunTheatre



WM:



jm



A splendid example in pen technic, designing, pen drawing and lettering by P. W. Costello, Scranton. Pa.




.^^^ud/ne^^/^fUiOiar ^




Miss Ellen E. Klnsel. whose clear-cut, pleas-
ing, aggressive and determined features are
shown herewith, is a native of Altoona, Pa.,
where she is supervising the writing in the pub-
lic schools, and doing It with her tireless energy
and characteristic, progressive spirit.

She received her early education in the public
schools of Altoona, and later taught in the
grades, attending summer schools at Ebens-
burg, the University of Pennsylvania, and the
Zanerian. At one time she specialized on
Mathematics, but became inierested in the
teaching of penmanship, with the result that
her work in that line and her enthusiasm led to
her being elected to supervise the writing
throughout the schools.

The progress her teachers and pupils are mak-
ing, and the results they are securing, indicate
that Supt. Baish made no mistake in selecting
her as the human dynamo of pedagogy and
practice in writing to place that subject on a ba-
sis second to no other anywhere.

Her personality is pleasing, her manner tact-
ful, her enthusiasm sincere, and her energy
catching.



THE EASTERN PENMAN

Published Every Month by

B. H. SPENCER, Paterson, N. J.

One of the finest penmen in the V S.
writes : •■The March number of the East-
ern Penman is worth the price of a year's
subscription."

SEND FOR A SAMPLE COPY TODAY



PERSONAL BOOKKEEPING

is a text designed for the specific purpose of
showing any man or woman how he or she may
keep a record of individual business transactions
in the briefest and most systematic way possi-
ble. It gives a thorough understanding of the
principle and rules of double entry bookkeeping.
Price postpaid, 81.00.

O. L ROGERS, Publishers

1210 Nuttman Ave. Ft. Wayne, Ind.



Gr ak.ncl C Krlstnrka^s Of f er

50c WORTH OF ARTISTIC PENWORK FOR 25c

This ■QKer' is lo NEW CUSTOMERS ONLY. Limit. ONE

tea Customer.

6 large rtne quality cards, with Merry Christmas 1912
and your name written In our rtnest style; value 15c. 6
hand nourished cards, six designs, with Merry Christmas,
name and year llnely lettered In; value 26c. One large
hand-Hoarlshed Christmas Card, bird design, postal card
size with name. etc.. Inserted; value lOo. This whole lot
only 26c postpaid; value 50c.

Any o( above mailed separately for value gli
"1. stamps J. ■ ■ .- ■
ved. Zanei
our wort. Order earl:

F. E. PERSONS, 445 Breckenridge SL, BUFFALO, N. Y.



HINTS TO THE LEARNER OF
ROUNDHAND OR ENGROSS-
ING SCRIPT.

BY THE EDITOR

The style of writing shown herewith, com-
monly called rouodhand or engrossing script,
was evolved between four and five hundred
years ago, and reached a very high state of de-
velopment, almost as we have it today, in the
sixteenth century.

It has been modified less since that time than
any other style of writing, due to the fact that it
possesses more hne art qualities than any other
hand. Its broad turns, heavy shades, and light
lines make it plain, graceful and effective.

To acquire it one should use an Oblique holder
with the pen point elevated above the center of
the holder, nearer the top of the holder
than the center. The pen should be flexible,
yet fine; the ink should be dark enough to
make a black shade and yet thin enough to
make a gray hair line. The paper should be
firm.

The movement employed is not as free
and rapid as in {irnamental or business penman-
ship. The hand should be thrown over on the
side and the movement should be a combina-
tion of linger, hand, wrist and arm action. Some
use the fingers more than the wrist and arm,
while some seem to use the wrist and arm more
than the fingers. The action should he slow
and sure.

The straight line exercise representing the
first copy given herewith, is a good one to prac-
tice upon, aiming to space it uniformly, to slant
it regularly, and to make the strokes the same in
width. It is also well to begin and end the
stroke as nearly square with the head and base
lines as possible. It is also best to use a head
and base line for the minimum letters.

The second exercise is made by raising the
pen at the base line, after having turned it
toward the right. The exercise can be done
fairly successfully without pen lifting, but near-
ly all engrossers raise the pen, as it releases the
tension and allows more of a rest. The up
stroke can then be made more freely than the
down stroke. The up stroke, however, should
not be slanted more than the down stroke.
Make a full turn at the bottom, and then
make the stroke upward rather than rightward
aiming to make the downwardstrokesclose to it.
The third exercise is the reverse of the second
the turn being made at the top instead of the
bottom. There is no need, however, of raising
the pen at the top, although some engross-
ers do it. Start the second form close to the first
and do not touch the shade, or it will blurr.

The fourth exercise, the one with the turn at
the top and at the bottom, is one that needs to
be made with less freedom than appears, for it
looks as though it might be made quite offhand,
but such is not the case. Endeavor to keep the
turns the same in width at the top as at the
bottom, and the shaded strokes the same slant
and width as in the former exercises.

The fifth exercise involves similar principle
to the exercises above, but is more compact and
technically more difticult, because of the close
contact of the hair lines to the shades.

The "n" exercise is an excellent one for prac-
tice, involving the principles in the first and
fifth exercises.

The "u", "n"and "m" exercises each in turn
involve no new principles and therefore need
but little additional comment. The finish of the
"w" should be made on the inside of the form or
to the left of the upstroke, and it is well to make
it in the form of a blind or filled-in loop.

Keep the connecting lines between the small
"v's" quite close in order to keep the shades on
the"v's" from being thrown too far apart, the
aim being to keep shaded strokes as nearly
equally distant as possibe.



The "x" is started the same as "n" and the
second part is much the same as an unshaded

All of these forms were written and reduced
one-third in engraving, and retouched but very
little. They are given to show rather free, ac-
tual writing rather than the most perfect type. In
practicing these copies it would be well to use
one-half inch ruled paper and to make the let-
ters one-half inch high.

Strive to secure graceful turns, and shades
that are apparently uniform in width from top to
bottom, allowing about one-third or one-fourth
of the heighth of the letter for turn-making and
for increasing or diminishing the shade. No
slant lines were used and none are recommend-
ed for ordinary practice, it being well to train
the eye to judge spacing and slant..



///////////




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/nmm^y



JJMmJ/l/y''



^^i^^tOineU^^^ttiua^i^ ^




DDC



DC



DESIQNINO

And

EMOROSSINO

By

E. L. BROWN.

Rockland, Me.

Send self -addressed

postal for criticism,

and stamps for return

of specimens.

"~



DOC



and your work will grow in strength and gener-
al effect.

When your drawing is completed, view it at a
distance of three or four feet to see how well
you have hlended the tones. At this distance
the values will be nearly as soft and pleasing as
those of a wash drawing.

Best wishes for a Happy Christmas.



Study in Lines

Tt matters little what medium is used as long
as the drawing is correct in values. The Christ-
mas design shows what effect can be obtained
with a coarse pen and black ink.

Lay off the design roughly in pencil, first aim-
ing for the general proportions, size and style
of lettering, etc. The ice effect on initial "C"
and the snow on bows suggest winter, and Old
Santa's face reminds us of the mid-winter holi-
day season, of Christmas presents and good
cheer.

After the pencil drawing is finished proceed
to ink in, using a medium coarse pen and India
ink. Chemical inks should not be used for pen
drawing. Study the color values very carefully.
Use vertical lines for background of initial "C"
and figures. Leave the white paper for ice,
snow and the beard of Santa. Don't use any
more lines than you need for the desired effect.
Study constantly to eliminate superfluous lines,





Resolutions, Testimo-
nials, Memorials, Etc.
ENGROSSED


-"^^


Heraldry and Illumina-
tion Diplomas Filled


l.U Alderman


H. W. STRICKLAND

St. Springfield. Mass.



FINE PENMANSHIP

Try our Superior Courses in Shading Penman-
ship. Students everywhere are delighted with
our Fancy and Artistic Styles. All copies pen
written. You should educate for profitable em-
ployment, there is money in this work for you.
Write at once for full particulars and free sam-
ples of our fine Pen Art Work. Address.

WORLD S COR. SCHOOL OF PEN ART,
JUNCTION CITY. OHIO



-^Penmen's Supplies-^

500-3ply Wed. Cards, 75c. 500 Colored, 70c

100-12ply Cards for knife Carving 35c

100 Hot Air Cards. 25c 100 Bird Cards 25c

12 Pen Flourished Post Cards, assorted, 15c

Penmen's Souvenir & Card Writing (36 p) 35c
1 lb. Special ruled paper for Script Writing, 45c
1 Hand turned oblique penholder, prof style 35c
One 2 oz. bottle Card Writer's Favorite Ink, 25c.
The above Articles Sent Prepaid by Mail.

46 page Manual for Card Writers 2c
W. McBee. 19 Snyder St., N. S. Pittsburgh, Pa.



,jETEINBllliK
(EliegOSSINIiINK



WRITE EVERLASTINGLY BLACK



The Eternal Ink is for gen-
eral writing: in plaio or fountain
pena (3 oz. bottle by mail aoc.)
The Engrossing Ink is for
special writing, eDgro8§ing, etc.
(3 oz. bottle by mail 30c.)

These in Ite write black from the pen

point and otay black forever; proof to

age, air, BonBhlne, chemicals and fire.

If your dealtT dots not supply

these inks, send to

GHAS. M. HIGGINS & GO , Mfii ,
271 Ninth St. BaooLra, N. Y.






J. V. Barnes, Wenatchee, Wn.







^_L.^ j^gtt? lCtc<Mi$c

€ouxtt\( of Monroe | ^■^•



_3udgc.



W. C. Browiifield. Penman, Bowling Green, Ky., Business University.



f^^^u4/n^U^(^/ui^a^^ ^



i r— in i__i L_ i rz ri

BOOK REVIEWS Q



nicziaiizji:



"Lessons in Penmanship" by J. H. Bachten-
kircher, Lafayette. Ind.. is the title of a splen-
didly written and graded penmanship exercise
intended for use primarily in the grades of the
public schools.

"Pitman's Shorthand Writers Phrase Book
and Guides"— Railway-Price 75c and "Key to
Isaac Pitman Shorthand," price $1.00. are the
titles of two splendidly bound, printed and en-
graved books of special vnlue to teachers of
Isaac Pitman's Shorthand, being high grade in
quality and thoroughly practical. Faultless is
the term which comes more nearly describing
these products than any other in our vocabulary.

"Modern Public School Writing" is the title
of a very practical little booklet of 43 pages
by G. A. Race. Supervisor of Penmanship, Bay
City. Mich. It is based upon the arm move-
ment method and contains a graded series of
copies especially designed for grammar grade
use. The copies having been written and photo
engraved from the actual free and rapid writing
of the author. Mr. Race is one of our wide
awake progressive practical supervisors.

"A Manual of Shoemaking and Leather and
Rubber Products" by William H. Dooley, Prin-
cipal of the Lowell Industrial School, Little,
Brown & Company, Boston, Price, SI. 50 net.
The Manual contains 287 pages, cloth bound,
printed on heavy paper and profusely illustrated.
Anyone interested in the making of shoes will
find this volume of exceptional value, covering
as it does the history of shoe making, the anat-
omy of the foot, the materials which go to make
up shoes, the method of manufacturing, etc., etc.
Teachers (»f commercial geography and com-
mercial products will find this Manual authori-
tative and practical.



"Correct Business and Legal Forms", a refer-
ence manual for Stenographers, Secretaries and
reporters by Eleanor Banks, G. P. Putnam's
Sons, New York and London. Price SI. 25 net.
This volume is cloth bound, well printed and
contains 253 pages, covering almost every con-
ceivable phase of correspondence, documents of
various sorts, punctuation, grammar, etc. It im-
presses us as being an excellent manual for
ready reference and authority for people who
have much writing to do.

"Everybody's Dictionary," by The Practica
Text Book Co.. Cleveland, O., is received
and is well named. We know of no other
vest pocket dictionary used so extensive-
ly, as this, and we presume the reason is that
there is no other so good. It makes one of the
most delightful and useful little Christmas
presents we know of . Many schools and busi-
ness concerns order it in large quantities, with
special imprint, for the purpose of giving it to
their pupils, patrons, and friends. It is handy;
it is complete; it is compact; it is artistic; it is
cheap. What more might be said or desired?

"Literary Composition" by Sherwin Cody.
School of English, Publishers. 1411 Security
Building. Chicago. 111., price 75 cents, is the
the title of a 227 page, well-bound volume
specially written to assist home students to a
better knowledge, appreciation, and use of the
English language. The plan of the book is
largely original and any one who will persis-
tently pursue its contents will be greatly bene-
fitted. The variety of the subject matter and
the excellence of the selections as models or
standards are such as to inspire continued effort
on the part of the self-improving student. Half
of the exercises give practice in talking, and
half in writing what has first been talked; thus
aiding in both spoken and written speech. We
commend it most heartily.

"Alphabets and other Material Useful to Let-
ters" by Chas. Rollinson, published by D. Van
Nostrand. 25 Park Place. New York. Price 81. 00,
is the title of a thirty-three page, cloth-bound



white embossed title, well-printed book of Al-
phabets, Borders and Designs especially suited
to engrossing. The book starts out with brief
but very practical instruction concerning mater-
ials, designing, etc. Business, ornate and round-
hand script follows, with standard alphabets
such as Roman. Block, Old English and Ger-
man Text, with a number of other alphabets.
The book ends with three superb examples of
engrossing, two of which were done entirely
with the pen, the last in the book being a vig-
nette reproduction of an illuminated piece of
engrossing. No engrosser can afford to be
without this compact, high grade, classic pro-
duction. The author, Mr. Rollinson. conducts
the leading engrossing establishment in New
York City, and in all probabilities of America.




Marion Webster arrived October 16th, weigh-
ing nine pounds, at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
P. W. Clark. Louisville, Ky.. Clark's Commer-
cial School. Our best wishes to all concerned.



Arrived at Crafton. Pa., this twentieth day of
June, 1012, a boy, weight 10 pounds. Mr. and
Mrs. C. Edw. Presho.

Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Martin announce the birth
of Roy Daniel, Oct. 19, 1912, Providence, R. I



Some highly colored and creditable automatic
pen lettered and decorated cards, and others
WTitten quite skillfully with the pen in orna-
mental penmoDship, are hereby acknowlodged
from Mr (Jeo. H. Folk, Junction Ctty. O.. who
reports a flourishing business in this line.



SHORTHAND EXERCISES-JUST OUT



The great .success and popularity of our Letter Writing Lessons and our Plain English in Practical
Exercises, used with their respective text-books, has led to the preparation of Shorthand Exercises to
accomplish for Shorthand what the other exercise books have accomplished in the study of Letter
Writing and of English. That is, to provide for the student a thorough and practical course covering
the whole subject, and so arranged as to arouse enthusiasm and maintain the highest interest, thus
perfecting the student in both principle and practice, without distasteful monotony.

This new book contains sixty exercises and occasional review lessons, making 247 pages. Abund-
ance of shorthand and longhand, both in words and sentences, is provided for transcription in the
blank lines and columns reserved for the student to fill. This book is a time-saver for both student
and teacher. The arrangement is unique, and it is brim full of attractive features. Teachers should
send twenty cents in postage stamps for sample copy.

We desire, also to make timely mention of the fact that EVERYBODY'S DICTIONARY is the
most appropriate Christmas gift a school or teacher can bestow upon a pupil. Gilt edged, morocco
bound, and gold embossed, it is as elegant as it is useful. The imprint of your school upon the cover
makes it an ideal advertising feature. Thumb-indexed, red morocco, 50 cents — green morocco, 60 cents.
Write for prices to schools. Catalogue free — and we pay the freight.



THE PRACTICAL TEXT BOOK COMPANY



EUCLID AVENUE AND 18TH STREET



CLEVELAND, OHIO



|.JII.Ilil>Jl>.I.IM.IlWJJHIJMIIIIBilll.|l«IJJ«UllllUJIIIlllI^HmM.IILILIILlianilBHa



^^^^ud/n^i^/i^Oiu^afr ^




Lehman's Standard Penmanship

This is the book every teacher of writing
needs, and every student should have. It
will show you how the letters, figures, and
signs are made, and how to teach and prac-
tice writing in a systematic way. Price. 50c.

H. B. LEHMAN
Central High School ST. LOUIS. MO.



MIOH GRADE

DIPLQMASa-
CERTiriCATES,



We Furnish Diplomas of the Best
Quality at the Lowest Cost

A BOOKLET of Made-to-Order Diplomas
now in press. It will contain a variety
ol designs made for different schools
during the past year. It's free.
Let us book your name for our Annual
Catalog.

ART ENGROSSING. We solicit your
orders for engrossed Resolutions and
Memorials. Strictly highest grade
workmanship, prompt delivery and
reasonable prices.

HOWARD & BROWN

DIPLOMAS ENGROSSING

ROCKLAND, MAINE




By E. L. Glick, Penman, Northwestern Business College. Spokane, Wn.





A NEW

MAIL

COURSE



in plain writing for teachers and home stu-
dents. Contains 12 parts of 12 lessons each.
Pen written copies. 100 examination ques-
tions asked and answered. Circulars for a
stamp.

J. A. STRYKER, Penman State Normal and Super-
visor Penmanship City Schools. Kearney. Nebr.
STUDIO 617 W. 24th ST.



I

na

for 16 cents.

I will give free a pack of
samples and send terms to
aeents with each order.

agxhts wakteb

Rl AMI/ PAQnQ ' ^'■'1^ the very bent blank

DL.MIll\ l/HnUO cards noiv on tlie market.

irs. Sample 100

Card Circular



100 postpaid, 25c Leas for more. Ink, Glossy Black
or Very Best White, 15c, per bottle. 1 Oblique Pen Hold-
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W. A. BODE. Box I7«. FAIR HAVEN. PA.



! Show Card Work, Lettering, Etc. Accurate Lettering is easily and rapidly done with c

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THE NEWTON AUTOMATIC SHADING PEN CO.. DEPT. F. PONTIAC. MICH., U. S. A.



Samples for Trial

12 pens, assorted patterns
for all styles of writing sent
postpaid on recept of 10c.

Your hand writing is a part of

your personality and you need

a pen that fits yourself.



Spencerian Pen Co.

349 Broadway NEW YORK



e:ste:rbrook's pe^ns



" Bur to write with,
CORRECT DBSION



Hard to use up.

DNIFORH TBUPBR DtJRABILITY



ISO STYI^ES






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tic for card writii



ESTBRBROOK STCCL PEN MFG. CO.

as JOHN ST.. N. Y. CITT CAMDEN. NEW^ JERSEY



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ALFRED FIELD 01 CO.. Sole Agents
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DESIGNERS - ILLVSTRflTORS

BNQ1??IVERS

(^LUMBU^. Ohio




No penman, teacher or student of penmanship



Online LibraryFrank OvertonThe Business Educator (Volume 18) → online text (page 40 of 103)