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Cessons in engrossing-Cwentv=four-Bv R. U». Kibbc, 18! Crcmont
Street, Boston, mass.

Sometimes the matter to be engrossed is very long. In such cases full pages may be
written compactly, as in copy, or spaced to suit the engrosser's taste. Uniform spacing,
shading and slope are necessary in page writing. The copy was written on lines eleven
inches long and one-half inch apart. We advise the student to rule such a page and copy
this lesson, and then write a second page from a printed copy or from manuscript. Rule
head and base lines only as pencil guide lines.



jpitiumi iiimiiNiiiiiKiiiiiN mil: msm iminiiiii iiiii iiiii siiiiiiiiiiBHimiiiiiiiiiiiiiim; iiiiiiii iiiii jiiiii. •iiiiiii.iiiiiii mm inn ■hhmi win mi m mm mi

! LEARN AUTOMATIC PEN-WORK

If you want to learn an art that is both profit-
able and interesting, try Automatic Pen Lettering.

THE GREATEST OFFER EVER MADE



,31 II! II! 13! !!' Mi *





1 COMPLETE LEARNER'S OUTFIT FOR

j (WE DO IT TO INTRODUCE TO YOU OUR GOODS.)

COPT OF FAUST'S COMPENDIUM OF AUTOMATIC PEN LETTERING AND DESIGNS.

3 SIZES AND STYLES OF AUTOMATIC PENS.

3 COLORS OF AUTOMATIC SHADING INK.

I BOTTLE OF ADHESIVE. 9

I BOTTLE OF GOLD INK.

3 PKGS OF ORNAMENTS, METALLICS, FLOCKS, AND DIAMOND DUST WITH INSTRUCTIONS FOR USING '
SAME. §f

This is the most complete outfit ever offered for anything like the price, and our goods are first-class- they do B
= the work. If you have the compendium you can get the balance of goods for $1 00, prepaid. Order at once.

| AUTO PEN AND INK MFG. CO., rs Rush 5t - Chicago, j

1*11 :l«: ill! Ill: III 1 It: ■ ». ^*ll !■ .:nHUI blllb'I^IU '1,11V -IHi ,)■!< ':inril|],M'llll lillrrllll lllh; • llllll' !IU: :!■)! Illh .III :!t.l 111 II .IIMIIi llli Jl! ill' 'ill II1MIU ,111 .!«, Ill: ^



1 HERE IT IS



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\X) a \ >»»?, ^b> ts^i







Cessons in

Sbow-Gard marking
and Painting, and
Automatic Ecmring

BY
W. A. THOMPSON,
PONTIAC, MICHIGAN







ihle tit



il



e proper



Automatic Shading Pen lettering.

NUMBER NINE.

The Automatic Shading Pen is so con-
structed as to produce two colors or shades
at a single stroke from one color of ink. It
is a strong and perfect device for rapid and
ornamental lettering of various styles, and
is daily becoming better known and its
field of usefulness is ' unbounded. This
style of lettering in Show Card work being
above the ordinary style of printing or
writing, attracts attention to the goods ad
vertised. Notwithstanding the many merits
of these pens many have found it difficult
to get good results, simply by not under-
standing or having a proper method of
lettering, to do the pen and themselves
justice.

If yon have carefully followed the instruc-
tion and outlines in Marking Pen Lettering
given in December, January and March
numbers, you will be in good position to
make a very creditable beginning in "Au-
tomatic Lettering," and in a short time
you will excite the curiosity of your friends
by rapidly executing new and novel de
signs in general lettering, also in forming
combinations of colors and shades in a few
minutes that can not he duplicated in as
many hours by the most successful sign
painter.

Outside of the practical and unique effects
in this (ia~- of work by these pens, they



forms and slants of in;m\ styles of letter-
ing with a greater degree of ease and accur-
acy than «.an be done in any other ■way.

In this lesson we present a rapid marking
alphabet. You wilt notice the Shading Pens
used are considerable wider than the Mark-
ing Pens von have been using in former
Lessons. Hold the Shading Pen exactly the
same as Marking Pen (see Fig. 3 in Decem-
ber number), and be careful to keep the
pen at one angle see lettering. Study care*
fully the combinations of t he letters, so as
to have your shading uniform. This is im-
portant. See letter H in the large letters in
hist line of illustration. Make lirst stroke,
then cross bar and then finish with last
Stroke. When making letter S always be-
gin with bottom stroke, and build up. the
top stroke being the last made. Pay par-
ticular attention to the make-up of these
two letters as yon proceed, ami you will
readily catch the idea for neat joining of
the different parts, so as to bring them clear
and distinct. This will help you in forming
the other letters of this alphabet. In the
small letters note carefully the curves,
length and width of each. See how the
stroke 7 and curve of o are combined. In
making tl, first make small o, then add
stroke / close to the right; finish b like o;
h like n.

Once more in regard to your inks. Shad-
ing ink should be a little thicker than the
ink for marking pens, but in your practice
workif you use ordinaiy manilla wrapping
paper of a fairly smooth surface, the ink
you have been using in former lessons will
throw two shades and will work very nicely.
In using paper or cardboard of a better
quality, that is a hard, smooth surface, your
shading ink will have to be of the proper
consistency to produce two distinct shades.
If your ink does not make two distinct
shades, (with the Shading Pen) it is too
thin. In this case add a few pieces of Gum
Aral iic ; this, when dissolved, will thicken
the ink. If the ink makes broken work ami



does not work smooth, it is too thick; to
remedy this add a few drops of water and
mix. When practicing always keep glass
with about half an inch of water in same
on table or desk as in December lesson, so
as to keep your pens in good working order.



WANTED

TEACHERS $



$



Have i



MANAGERS



iteed by n bank.

! I ,. V ,„.,.( i,, ,,„ n

tied "A Little Talk

ii free to ■."> one,
m> it tells "»



,'. little storj of
' 't Address,



. . . DRAUGHON'S . . .

Practical Business College Co.,

NASHVILLE, TEHN.




Mills's Correspondence
School ol Penmanship.



I,, show von where t,,

strike in order i « ►. .

the si Improvement.

Bend stamp for particu



E C Mills, 195 Grand Ave. Rochester. N. Y.



&he fawhlvhehb &&*k&&&vr &>



Reforms and Reformers in
Writing

Part Six - Simplicity, legibility.
Speed.



Too much arm movement and spued
applied to the beautiful forms gen-
erally recognized as Spcncerian, lead
to illegibility in the business world.
As a consequence there has been a
tendency, during the past decade,
on the part of practical teachers, to
omit flourishes and shades, and later,
to diminish the number and length of
initial and final strokes.

The Business Educator was the
first to recognize the fact that
the hand still generally taught
was constructed too much along
lines of beauty and skill rather than
plainness and ease, and it was the
first to advocate by precept and ex-
ample simplification of form as fol-
lows : Smaller, plainer, less skillful
capitals ; shorter and fewer loops ;
more rounding turns ; sharper angles
and fewer and shorter initial and
final strokes. In a word, it advo-
cated, and still advocates, plainer
writing, simpler writing, faster writ-
ing, easier writing.

The speed and movement advocates
neglected form— they grasped but a



part of the whole truth. Form and
movement ought to be united— the
one the complement of the other.
Progress in the art of writing has
been brought about by modification
of form, and if we wish to continue
to progress, we must do so by im-
proving the form along lines of sim-
pleness and ease. The so-called
muscular movement does very nicely
for professional purposes (is indis-
pensable) but the average person
cannot use it advantageously. Fin-
gers were made for use and people
will employ them in their writing.
It is the office of teachers to see that
they do not employ them to excess.



Compliment from Oklahoma.

•'It is my opinion that THE BUSINESS
Educator is far ahead of any periodical
edited along similar lines, and you shall
always have my hearty co-operation and
support as long as your pa peris published-"
J. W. Cornell,

Eagle City, Okla.



Appreciated in Couisana.

The Business Educator gets better
every issue, I cannot find words to express
my appreciation of it. The February issue is
well worth the subscription price of it for
twelve months May it long live and carry
on the good work it advocates.

V. K. Boyett,

Montgomery, La.



Cbe Bern.

"Find enclosed $1.00 for The BUSINESS
EDUCATOR another year. Each number
grows more interesting, and I consider it
the ' Gem ' of all publications of its class."
J. A. CLARK, Prin.,
International Bus. College,
Newport News, Va.,



Dudley in Desmoines



From the Des Moines Daily Xews, April
5th, 15103, we learn that Mr. A. W. Dudley,
Marshaltown. la., has purchased the Iowa
Business College, Des Moines, la., and
added thereto the Capital City Telegraph
Institute.

Mr. Dudley is a business educator of
more than usual force and ability, and we
therefore predict that the Iowa Business
College will be a more important factor in
the educational world than it has been in
the past. We certainly wish him success.



(Commissioner myers



Business Educator, Columbus, O.

DEAR Sir: This will inform you that I

have recently been elected County Scl 1

Commissioner of Shelby County, Missouri.
This office will not interfere with my duties
as principal of the commercial department
of our public school, and I will, in the
future, continue to use your valuable pub-
[ications as heretofore.

With best wishes for your continued pros-
perity and with an abiding faith in com-
tnercial training, commercial departments
of public schools, and business training in
general, I am, Yours respectfully,

S. C. MYERS,
Shelbyville, Mo., April 16, 1903.



The Devil Himself Doesn't Know What I am Going to Talk About."



A Presbyterian pastor a
arguing about the necessity i
aration for the Sunday serm

stoutly maintained that it -^
preparation be made, by me
principles underlying the



1 a Methodist dominie were
id the value of making prep-
i. The Presbyterian brother
is indispensible that careful
as of a thorough study nil lie
ibject to be discussed, by out-



. by illustrations, and finally by applying the truth
concretely. Hut the disciple of John Wesley held that all
such labor and forethought was not only a waste of good
time but that it was an irrefutable proof of a lack of faith,
" for," said he, "it is written in the Bible, ' Take no thought
how or what ye shall speak: for it shall be given you in
that same hour what, ye shall speak.' Furthermore," he
continued, " it is well known that the arch enemy of man-
kind is ever present to turn to bad uses the efforts of the
good; so I make no preparation at ail. and then when I
get up to speak the devil himself doesn't know what I am
going to talk aboi t." Did you ever hear this preacher?
Did you ever observe his brother, the teacher, whose funda
mental principle of pedagogy is, " Learn to do by doing?"

This catch phrase shows the malignant power of words,
for, notwithstanding the large sale of some of these actual-
business-froni-tlie-start systems of bookkeeping, some
private commercial school men of excellent judgment,
who have large interests in these publications, do not use
them in their own schools. They hold that the plan of
years ago— that theory (preparation of the sermon I should
precede practice (application of the principles)— is the
best that has been evolved for the most effective teaching
of bookkeeping and the use of business forms. We agree
with them.

The most successful teachers of bookkeeping invari-
ably supplement any of these actual-business-from-the-
start systems with a good thorough drill on journalizing,



posting, taking trial balances, making statements, and
closing ledger accounts, before launching into the handl-
ing of business papers, which is new enough to the average
student of bookkeeping to justify special treatment, apart
from his study of the rules of bookkeeping. We save both
teacher and student all of this bother and twisting of an
author's plan, by presenting the theory first, so that a
student may be thoroughly taught the underlying princi-
ples first, with one, two, or three sets— as the teacher
chooses— in which to apply the principles, before taking
up the work on business papers. But we have the busi-
ness papers— Business Practice, as it is sometimes called —
and they are in the most attractive and convenient form
of any now to lie had. Besides they are not so voluminous,
so connected, nor so expensive as -to be prohibitive to
those who desire to do only a reasonable amount of this
work in a course, which may be necessarily short; although
they are so elastic that they will provide all of the work
that the best students can do -when our Complete Prac-
tical Bookkeeping is used -in a one year course in Book-
keeping, Business Practice, and Office Work. These books
stick wherever they are given a fair trial. They save time,
money, and educational waste. Let us send you deserip-

Do not overlook the fact that we stand alone in pro-
viding fully for the English work of commercial schools-
Spelling. Correspondence, and Language-all prepared to
meet the peculiar needs of commercial classes, in an ade-
quate manner. These hooks are used and commanded by
the foremost commercial teachers of this country. Besides,
we have text-books on all other commercial subjects, ex-
cept Geography and Economics. If you are not quite sat-
satisfied with some of the books you are using, let us see
what we can do for you.



THE PRACTICAL TEXT BOOK COMPANY, 479 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio.



XS£ CAUSE AND CURE

OF DISEASE EXPLAINED



THE ONE CAUSE

Nature originates and destroys.

The destructive process begins with the fermen-
tation and decay of blood corpuscles.

The cause of this fermentation is from Bacteria
or microbes in the system.

The fermentation does not take place without
air, heat and moisture for the germs or
microbes are living organisms, that multiply
in myriads with great rapidity.

These microbes when fully developed, colonize in
great numbers and attack the various vital
organs of the body by feeding on the tissues
thus producing inflammation which is sick-
ness.

If there were no microbes there would be no fer-
mentation, hence there would be no sickness;
life would continue indefinitely; suffering
brought about by ill-health would cease and
the processes of nature would stagnate.

To this law man is no exception, and in it is the
secret cause of all disease.

No sickness can come on without microbes in
the blood.

THE UNIVERSAL CAUSE OF DISEASE IS MI-
CROBES WHICH PILLAGE AND DESTROY.




Human Blood in Health En-



WBr)


. ^ \ ^^




\




?$i




W^tf





i Blood Full of Germs
rged i.ooo Times.



THE ONE CURE

As the cause of all diseases is conclusively proven
by every authority to be fermentation in the
blood, produced by g rms and microbes,
common sense diciaus that if the m crobes
were destroyed the caus<- would be removed.

The only known principle powerful enough to
destroy the microbe in the blood, yet harm-
less as water to the tissues, was discovered by
the learned scientist and microscopist, Prof.
Wm. Radam. Its peculiar character is that
of a true antiseptic and germicide, and its
fame is world-wide under the name of
"Radam's Microbe Killer."

It has withstood the most critical scientific exam-
inations and is endorsed by every eminent
medical authority.

As all disease originates from the same source,
microbes: Radam's Microbe Killer prevents
and cures EVERY DISEASEby destroying
Bacteria the organic life that causes fermen-
tation and decay of blood corpuscles. Kills
the germs, and nature, through rich, red
blood, kills the disease.

THE UNIVERSAL CURE FOR DISEASE IS TO KILL
THE MICROBES WHICH PRODUCE IT.



Enlightened Science Admits that all Sickness is Caused by

GERMS OR BACTERIA

Poisoning and Wasting the Blood, the Tissues and Vital Organs.

THE ONLY UNIVERSAL REMEDY, FOUNDED ON THE GERM THEORY OF DISEASE,
AND FULLY PROVEN BY TWENTY YEARS OF SUCCESS, IS

RADAM'S MICROBE KILLER

A PLEASANT TART DRINK; ABSOLUTELY HARMLESS.




It Kills the Microbes r - • tr jw^nti a

of the Skin and cures fclvAfciHA.

It Kills the Microbes E>r»/~k XT/-" 1 U ITI C

of the Throat and cures DKwINLrll 1 IS.

'* K "of .He a"Sd cures CONSUM PTION.

of the Kidneys and cures BRIGHT'S DISEASE.

H1 «t£mSK2*mn. CATARRH, RHEUHATISM,

/"• A\Tr*cn and a" other Blood
CAIMCtK and Chronic Disease



Full particulars with reports of Scientific Experiments and
Convincing: Testimonials of Wonderful Cures mailed free to
any address on application.

RADAM'S MICROBE KILLER CO.

CHICACO.



40 oz. Bottle, $ 1 . 1 69 S. Canal Street,




One Cal. Jug, $3.



A. A. VOGEL, Exclusive Agent,

103 South High Street, - - - COLUMBUS, OHIO.



£/lvc fJu^utc^CcU^ulor 4&




Good Script Cuts.

attract attention even in the cheapest news-
paper. If you want something fine— something
out of the beaten path— write to
CIRCULARS FREE. C. P. ZANER, Columbus, O.



Penmanship Supplies

FINEST OBTAINABLE



PENS AND HOLDERS



All goods listed below go' by mail post-
paid.

Zanerian Fine Writer Pen— The best and
finest fine writing pen made — best for
engrossing, card writing and all fine
script work. Gross $1.00, % Gross 25c,
1 Doz.. 12c

Zanerian Ideal Pen- One of the best pens
made for general penwork— business
or ornamental. One of the best pen«
for beginners in penmanship. Gross
75e, % Gross 25c, 1 Doz 10c.

Zanerian Business Pen— A smooth, dura-
ble, common sense business pen. For
unshaded business writing it has
never been excelled, if equaled. Gross
75c, % Gross 25c, 1 Doz 10c.

Glllott's Principality Ho. I Pen— A fine
writing pen. Gross $1 00, % Gross, 25c,
1 Doz 12c.

Glllott's Double Elastic E. F. Ho. 60* Pen—
A medium fine writing pen. Gross 75c,
l 4 Gross 25c, 1 Doz 10c.

Glllott's Magnum Quill E. F. Ho. 601 Pen—
A business pen. Gross $1.00, }l Gross
25c, 1 Doz .'. ._. 12c.

Gillott's Ho. 303 E. F. Pen- Used largely
for drawing purposes. Gross 11.00,
H Gross 25c. 1 Doz ..12c.

Gillott's Lithographic Pen Ho. 290-One
of the finest pointed drawing pens
made. 6 pens 25c, 3 pens __ 15c.

Gillitt's Trow Quill Pen Ho. 659 -Very
fine points. 6 pens 25c, 3 pens 15c.

Soennecken Lettering Pen— For making
German Text, Old English, and all
broad pen letters. Set of 12— numbers
1, \%, 2, 2%, 3, 3%, 4, 5 and 6 single
pointed and 10, 20, and 30 double
pointed 25c.

Double Holder for Soennecken Pens-
Holds 2 pens at one time 10c.

Zanerian Obique Penholder - Hand-
made, rosewood, 12 inches long, a
beautiful and perfect holder. 1 holder 50c.

Fine Art Ob ique Holder - Inlaid and
fancy, hand-made, rosewood, and by
far the most beautiful holder made.
1 holder sent in a small wooden box. $1.00

Excelsior Oblique Holder— The best low
priced oblique holder made. Many
hundreds of gross have been sold.

1 Holder 10c

1 Dozen 50c.

hi Gross $1.10

>| Gross 2 15

1 Gross 4 25

Straight Penholder- Cork tipped and
best for business writing, flourishing,
etc. 1 holder 10c, 6 holders 40c. 12
holders 65c.

We handle the best and can save you
money.

Cash must accompany all orders. Prices
are too low to keep accounts. Remit by
money order, or stamps for small amounts

Address, Zaner & Bloser,
Columbus, O.



to

It

be

by

1 Jo


nt jab and soil your fingers trymo-
pull Ihol old rusty pen. fiuy the
PERFECT PEN-PULLER.
5 handy.neol and small. and tan
carried in. the vest pocket. Price,
mail postpaid, 12 cents.
hnW.Mo.nuel, iColumbus,Ohio.



1HEPERFEC1
PEH PULLEE



performs the
work perfectly
and painlessl \
and with clean
fingers.



C P. ZAHER



A NEW BOOK

Modern Show Card Lettering,
Designs, Etc.,

With 2,000 Advertising Phrases
for Display Signs, Show Cards
f<nd Posters.

If you are interested in this line of
work write for new circulars. They're
free. Address,

W. A. THOMPSON,

POD/TIAC, MICH.



TOMB.'



gM



km



AIOL CATALOG

( KJELETTIMaiEr !

\ rnfirTfliaDLWORPHLY. /i

I ^CQHCRES5MuW,aL# I



GILLOTT'S PENS



THE MOST PERFECT OF PINS,

HAVEGAINEDTHE

GRAND PRIZE,

Paris Exposition, 1900.

Thli is the Highest Prize ever Awarded to Pen*




Of Diplomas, Designing
and Engrossing i? i?



Send for it. We have the Gu-
est assortment of diplomas
for business and shorthand
schools ever published — all
new. Catalogues Illustrated,
Resolutions Engrossed, etc.
Correspondence Solicited. . . .

Howard (&. Brown,

Rockland, Maine.



Jhe

Practical
jtfge r*



Premium
Offer .->



Good
Values

Aittle
Money



The Practical Age, which
i9 very surely taking its place
with the standard magazines
of the country, offers the fol-
lowing great -values for
the following small sum of
money :



Frank Leslie's Popular
Monthly. Frank Leslie's Art
Calendar for 1903, and the
Practical Age, one year, for
$1.30.



The Practical Agk is a
magazine for people who
think and act. The editorial
discretion exercised in the
selection of manuscripts ap-
pearing in the Practical
Age, is experienced and fair,
making for the best interests
both of magazine and read-
ers. Besides the several de-
partments already appearing
in the magazine, new, inter-
esting, and invaluable de-
partments will be added,
from time to time.



REGULAR SUBSCRIPTION
| 50 Cents A Year |

SAMPLE COPY FKEE



PRACTICAL AGE

MOLINE. ILL






Special Care And Attention Given to Reproduction of






#



<^° &^; &^ &*<^; &^* S^ &^ gg g;g; s§;£=^ &F?; &F? * "~ "^



©



%



#



i«A



We do Three
Things Well



1.






We provide the best subject matter ob- j«n
tainable in our commercial text books. .V.



2. We supply a high quality of paper and
the best quality of printing and binding in
all bound books, blanks and stationery.

3. We offer our books at reasonable prices
with one price and one method of con-
ducting business for all.



If this Advertisement does not attract your attention

it is because it is not well written and not because the books we advertise are not worthy of attention.

THERE ARE VERY FEW COMMERCIAL TEACHERS, who have not heard of the
Sadler-Rowe Company's commercial publications, but there are doubtless many who do not have an
intimate acquaintance with their contents, with the educational spirit that runs through all of
them, with the fine methods of instruction which are incorporated as a part of the subject
matter, with the practical nature of the transactions and problems, supplementary drills, etc.,
which are presented for the student's consideration, with the carefully graded course of study
in each subject as it is outlined in the various texts, and with the ease with which teachers
can keep in touch with the work, can check student's results and can secure uniformly high-
grade results.

These are all important considerations in the make up of text books in any of the branches in-
cluded in the usual commercial and shorthand courses of study.



THE people of the country with boys and girls to educate for
life are becoming better informed as to the requirements
of a training for successful business employment. They will
not be satistied with old text books, old methods, and out-of-
date teachers <* <* •* •* «* «* >* j* j* <* ■*



Following are the titles of a few of our principle books :



Commercial and Industrial Bookkeeping.
Business Boukkeeping and Practice.
Sadler's Commercial Arithmetic and Essen-
tials ot Arithmetic.
Lister's Budget ot Writing Lessons.
Earnest's English- Correspondence.



Billings' Synthetic Shorthand.

( Graham-Pitmanic. )
Richardson's Commercial Law.
Macfarlane's Commercial Geography.
New Method Speller.
Banks' Easy Method of Touch Typewriting.






w




Online LibraryFrank OvertonThe Business Educator (Volume 8) → online text (page 69 of 80)