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Frank T.] [Lent.

Souvenir of Cranford, New Jersey online

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COPYRIGHT DEPCSII



E. W. THORNTON,

HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS,

Opera House Block, - Cranford, N. J.

The Best Goods at Low Prices.



THE STMDJIRD PUBLISHING CONCERN. PRIVATE SCHOOL For

„ . ^ ^ o u,- u YOUNG LADIES, MISSES, AND CHILDREN.

Printers and Publishers, - ^.^ p^y, /,„„,,^,;, m,ss vv,ng, ^.o. Pn«.

vir-»w ir-nonv ' Mile. LE PAGE, Fteitck.

NEW JERSEY. . ^ , ^ », »

Union Avenue, - Cranford, New Jersey.



WESTFIELD.



DIEDRICH KREIE, MOORE & MARTIN, BENBOW FERGUSON,

Contractor and Builder, I^MM McatS, FiSh, aild Vegetables, "^6 Franklin Ave, - Brooklyn, N. Y.
Cranford, - NEW JERSEY. ; MILLER BLOCK, (Contractor and tS^iilder,



p^* Builder of the Morrison. Banker, and Bennett ]
residences, the Presbyterian Church, and the Cranford
Country* Club, herein illustrated.

TOWNSEND'S GRANITE WORKS,

30 & 32 SOMERSET ST„

It'g employ no Agents to drum trade, and personally
attend to this tvork in all its branches.



CRANFORD. NEIV JERSEY.
W. W. MENDELL,



' Builder of the Purcell residence Csee page 12).



HAVE YOUR CARPET CLEANED



CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER, Old Reliable steam carpet Cleaning works,

CRANFORD, NEW JERSEY. ' ,,,s.JS>^^..^.:.^^^S!iB^TH. n. j.

E^ Builder of the Cochian and Parvin residences, and I j^- Altering and Laying Carpels and Furniture Up-
•• Hampton Hall." as herein illustrated, and scores of other ' bolstering, Specialties. No extra charge for work out of
buildings in Cranford and vicinity. i city.



DAVID B. LENT, Real Estate, Insurance, Loans, Etc.,

OPERA HOUSE BLOCK, - - CRANFORD, NEW JERSEY.

CDCPin I nCCUD • ^^^ sale.— The Lent residence (see pages lO and 12). A Complete Suburban Home on high ground at Cranford.
UlLuinL UrrLrV, AU improvements. Private Gas, City Water, Furnace and Steam Heat, etc. Lot 125 x 160. Price Sio,ooo. Easy

terms. N. B. — This place cannot be duplicated for the money. Possession given at any time.



■ W. W. GILBY,

WESTFIELD, - NEW JERSEY.

I CIIN SAVE YOU 25^ ON GROCERIES.

Se.nd Your Order by Mail.
prompt deuvery free of charge.



C. A. SMITH & CO.,

LUMBER MD MASON MATERIAL,
», Doors, Moldings, Tnrmg.anl Scroll sawiog.

Agents for Lister's Botie Fertilizers.
WESTFIELD. - NEW JERSEY.

W. H. SMITH S CO..

STONE-CUTTERS



THE SANDFORD CLARK CO, I R- »• shove,

^ WESTFIELD PHARMACY.

MASONS' rlATERIALS, Drugs, Medicines, and Toilet Articles, Ice
ELIZABETH, NEW JERSEY.

CENTRAL HOTEL,

PETER FINGER, Proprietor,

CRANFORD, N. J.

CHOICE LIQDORS, WINES, CIGARS, Etc.



Cream Soda, Strawberry and Peach Crush.

Cor. BROAD & PROSPECT STS.

Mounted Maps of Cranford.

Maps similar to the "Souvenir Map," mounted
on wooden rollers, etc., and suitable for hanging
in office, residence, or store. May be had at
"Souvenir Office." Room 8. Opera House Block.

Price 50 Cents Each.



ESTABLISHED 1867 .

ROBERT RINDELL,



STONE-MASONS.

Office: Cor. Pearl and Warren Sts,,
PLAINFiELD, NEW JERSEY.

Estimates given on all kinds of Stone Work,
from Foreign and Domestic Stock. We carry a
heavy lot of Stone for Bridge and Cellar Work.



DE.\LER IN



HIRAM L FINK,

Manufacturer of

FINE CARRIAGES. WAGONS, I SLEIGHS.

Dealer in

Harness, Blankets, Robes, Whips, etc.
ELM STREET. - WESTFIELD. N. J.



COAL MP LUMBER,

Drain Pipe, Lime, Lath, Plaster, Etc.,
CRANFORD. N. J.

PHILIP JAHN,

PAINTER AND DECORATOR,

CRANFORD AND ROSELLE, N. J.
PAPER HANGING A SPECIAL TY.

JOHN INGRAM,

SANITARY PLUMBING,

Steam and Gas Fitting, Tin, Copper,
and Sheet Iron Worker, Stoves,

Ranges, Home Furnishing Goods, etc.
WESTFIELD, NEW JERSEY.



JAMES G. MOORE.

MASON AND CONTRACTOR

Cranford, New Jersey.

Artutic Stone IVork a Specialty. Conlraiior

for tnasonrj/ in most o/the bousi^

herein illmlrated.

HENRY A. RATH, Jr.,

CONTRACTOR FOR

PLUMBING & HEATING,

Cranford, - New Jersey.

Contractor for work in residences of J. W. Banker, Jos
PurcelL '' Hampton Hall," and dozens of other buildings
in Cranford.

HENRY MILLER,
Practical Electrician,

WESTFIELD. N. J.
ll'iring for Electric Lighting a Specialty.



Copyright, 1894, BV Frank T. Lent.



CRANFORD SOUVENIR.




RESIDENCE G. A. MORRISON", ESQ.



GEOGRAPHICALLY Cranford, New Jersey, is
situated southwesterly from New Yoik Cit}-, about
seventeen miles distant, and on the southern slope of
the Orange Mountains. It is almost directly south of
Summit and Short Hills, and about five miles distant
from either of these places. Elizabeth is directly east
five miles away, Pl.iinfield directly west seven miles
away, and Railway to the south about five miles off.
The Rahway River, an extremely picturesque little
stream, winds its way gracefully around through the
village and is spanned by seven or eight bridges.
Cranfortl is in Union County, New Jersey, the county
renowned for its magnificent macadamized and Tel-
ford roads. The Central Railroad of New Jersey runs
directly through the town, and is the principal con-
necting link between it and the metropolis of New
York. The Lehigh Vallc\- Railroad runs through the
southern part of the township, but is yet little used by
the commuters and business men. The population of
the town is about twentv-five hundred.



PROFESSOR GEORGE H. COOK, late State
geologist, once said that the red soil and red shale
districts of New Jersey were its healthiest sections.
Geologically, therefore, Nature has done all that could
be done for the health of Cranford in this matter. But
while Nature has given Cranford the foundation of a
good, healthy soil, that gift is rcalK- nothing in com-








RESIDENCE PETER DUMONT, ESQ.



CRANFORD SOUVENIR.



parison to the magnanimdus kiiulness which she has
displa_\'ijd in tlevcloping tiic \illage surroundings into
the most picturesque to be found around any of the
liundreds of towns suburban to New York. The coun-
try is siiglitly rolh'ng, is well grown with shade trees,
and well carpeted with a lu.xuriant growth of wild
flowers.




RESIDENCE GEO. W. NIX, ESQ.

A COUNTRY home is perhaps the most satisfac-
tory for a residence one can possibly acquire.
There is more substance and solidity to be found in
suburban life — to say nothing of better and more air,
more light, more room, and more quiet comfort — than
in the narrow residence of the city, with its minimum
of light, its impure atmosphere, and ceaseless noise.
Taking all these matters into consideration, and then
adding the fact that a city house in a good neighbor-
hood costs several times as much as a country house
equally well located, it is easy to see why our country,
and especially our suburban, towns are rapidly building
up. To business men of large cities the daily travel to
and fi'o is disagreeable — at least until the habit is
formed. It takes about a month to get used to this.
In large cities the transit is so slow that one can go
twenty miles away from town on a good railway quite
as quickly as three or four miles are traversed by
street railway, so that no time is lost and the cost of
travel to and from near Ijv towns is but little different.
When one thinks of the health secured, of the addi-
tional charms of a country house, of country life, and
of the money sa\'ed, it is really no wonder that people
are turning their attention to suburban residences.



There is now a steady and increasing flow of people
from the larger cities to the neighboring country, inde-
pendent of the fashion of city people of spending a
few months or weeks at their country i^laccs. These
are the reasons why country towns are growing, anil
Cranford, with its natural charms, its healthfulness, its
nearness to New York, and its many improvements, is
one of the foremost to attract attention and secure its
share of the many sensible people who are seeking a
first-class village in which to locate.

TI IM town is built on high ground lying one hun-
dred or more feet above tide water, which eleva-
tion is sufificient to raise it above the banks of
malaiial fog which gather and cling with a sickl_\^ grip
to the lower lands of New Jersey. The Orange Moun-
tains, a few miles to the north, act as a sheltering wall
against the north and northwest winds, and the steady
southwest wind which prevails in summer renders the
atmosphere delightfully cool. No one ever thinks of
lying awake nights because of excessive heat.



-..^' - cluMcl, there is a Woman's Home

Missionary Society; the Oucen Esther

Circle of young ladies, organised for

both home and foreign work; an Epworth
I^eagueand a Junior League

CT. MICHAEL'S R^an Catholic
Church is situated on Elizabeth and
Bloomingdale avenues. It was cstab
''-•^iKxl in i .(, ,*«.



IN social advantages the town is well developed;
there is a well-managed Country Club, with a pretty
colonial clubhouse on the banks of the ri\-er; there
are all kinds of societies connected with the churches,
as well as those which are indcpemlent ; and there is a
Dramatic Club of no mean ability. The Wednesday
Morning Club (a book and literary association) is a
very admirably directed instituticm. Then there are
tennis, bicycling, baseball, bowling, an athletic and
other clubs devoted to amateur sport, including
a boating association. A thiifty Ivoyal Arcanum
council and other lodges occup\' the lodge rooms in
the Opera House Block, and a blight ami enterprising
musical society — the Alcacus — furnishes delightful
entertainments of an operatic and musical nature.

ONE of the special charms of country life is to be
within reach of a well-managed country club,
where friends can be met and friends be made. Such
social organizations as these have been the making of
some of our most successful country places. Every
year it is getting to be more fashionable to live in a
thriving country town. Now the town to pick out
must be one of easy access to the metropolis, one of
unquestioned healthfuiness, and one that is wide-awake.
Cranford can offer all these, and in its deliglitful
Country Club, with the bowling, billiards, dances,
games, dramatics, baseball, tennis, ])icycling, boating,



etc., etc., can afford a \'ery important and additional
charm. There is no one thing in the village that is
more attractive to the newcomer than the pretty club-
house up upon the bank of the river, and the warm
welcome given by the members, who are always
delighted to greet strangers. The club numbers a
hundred members, and an especially nice feature is that
the ladies — wi\es and daughters of the members — are
always welcome. It is not necessary to break up
home life when you go to the Countrj' Club — you can
take it with \-ou.



}








%










RKSUIKNCE JOH.N W. HANKER, ESQ.



CRANFORD SOUVENIR.
























RESIDEN'CE MRS. M. U. HENNEIT.



THE Cranford Dramatic Club began its existence
in 1S91, when "A Box of Monkeys" was played.
This play was presented so successfully that the people
of the new club felt much encouraged, and at once
determined to attempt something more serious. The
second effort, "Comrades," a well-developed and solid
pla\', was presented, and scored a greater success than
the first. "Our Regiment," given on Janaury 19, 1S93,
was a much more difficult and higlier class play than
either of the others, and the local actors proved that
they could handle it with success. Then in 1893
followed the farce "Rebecca and Rowena," wliich many
people thought the greatest of all the work done by the
club. The last play given was "Freezing a Mother-
in-law," in which the club held up its reputation again.
Everything done so far by the club has been the result
of hard and faithful stutly; and has been accomplished
witliout outside aid. The cffoits of the amateurs have
given many pleasant hours to their friends, and earned
many hundreds of dollars for worthy and charitable
objects.

THE Cranford Tennis Club (now merged into the
Country Club) has produced some very clever
players, and has organized several first-rate tourna-
ments. There are a number of fine tennis courts in



private grounds. The Baseball Club was a great suc-
cess last year anil the year before, and this }-ear a per-
manent baseball grountl will be established. The
Bicycle Club, with numerous club runs, road races, and
society meetings, was extremeh^ well patronized. On
account of the miles of fine roads all around and about
the town bicycling is not only a favorite amusement
for both gentlemen and ladies, but the wheel is used
largely for business purposes.




RESIDENCE R. E. COCHRAN, ESQ.



CRANFORD SOUVENIR.








THE SOURCE OF THE RIVER.



I ''ME first tlie writer ever heard of Cranford was
^ back in iS8o, when his artist friend Bruce-Crane
told him that he was packing up liis skctcliing appa-
ratus and impedimenta preparatory to going to sk-etch
in tlie neighborhood of Cranfonl. which he considered
one of the most deliglitfully picturesque sections of
country anywhere around or near New York Cit\-.

Tile National iXcadcmy of Design, as well _^.-, ,

as other metropolitan art exhibitions, have
contained many charming landscapes by sucli
men as Bruce-Crane ;uid Bolton Jones, the
material for which was gathered in Union
Countw

NnW'lIERE near New York can a more
equable and moderate climate be found.
It is just far enougli away and just high
enougli to be free from sea fogs and tlamp-
ncss, and \-et not so far as not to be in range
of tlie cooling sea breezes which each evening
set in from the ocean. The intense heat of
summer is avcrteil by the fine trees and woods,
and there is enough sharp winter to afford a
few tlays' sk:ighi)ig and several good old-fash-
ioned snow storms.



TH
re



HE Boating Association has had charge of the



;gattas on the river, and these, in years past, have
been \-ery successful cntci tainments, esjiecially some
of the canoe races. There is about a mile of good
boating on the river. But the greatest work done by
the association has been the organizing and carrying
out of the Venetian carni\als, which occur usuallv on



3V"-=^~333?5J7'





THE RAU.KO.\D BRUJGE.



CRANFORO SOUVENIR.



a niitlsumnicr's nii^ht, and are p
witliout question vei}- beauti-
ful ami cIiarniiiiL;'. On these
occasions the depths of the
foliaLre and the trees alon


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Online LibraryFrank T.] [LentSouvenir of Cranford, New Jersey → online text (page 1 of 2)