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Franklin Cogswell Prindle.

The Prindle genealogy. embracing the descendants of William Pringle the first settler, in part for six, seven and eight generations, and also the ancestors and descendants of Zalmon Prindle for ten generations, covering a period of two hundred and fifty-two years, 1654-1906 online

. (page 1 of 26)
Online LibraryFranklin Cogswell PrindleThe Prindle genealogy. embracing the descendants of William Pringle the first settler, in part for six, seven and eight generations, and also the ancestors and descendants of Zalmon Prindle for ten generations, covering a period of two hundred and fifty-two years, 1654-1906 → online text (page 1 of 26)
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PRINDLE GENEALOGY

Three hundred copies of this book have been
printed from type and the type distributed.

This copy is number . .Q U.




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The Prindle Genealogy

EMBRACING THE DESCENDANTS OF

WILLIAM PRINGLE

THE FIRST SETTLER, IN PART FOR SIX, SEVEN

AND EIGHT GENERATIONS, AND ALSO

THE ANCESTORS AND DESCENDANTS OF

ZALMON PRINDLE

FOR TEN GENERATIONS, COVERING A PERIOD OF
TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY-TWO YEARS

1654 TO 1906

COMPILED BY

FRANKLIN C. PRINDLE

U. S. NAVY '

'•'•Honor thy fathe7' ainf thy mother''''










J > > J >



THE GRAFTON PRESS

GENEALOGICAL PUBLISHERS
NEW YORK MCMVI



THE NEW YORK

PUBLIC LIBRARY

ASTOR, LENOX AND
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS
R ^ 1906 L



COPYRIGHT, 1906

BY

THE GRAFTON PRESS



c •



< t e f



t la
• • • •



to tljc £l9nnorv of

Ealmon ]^vint!le

a patriot &)olDirr

of ttjC

amcvican Urbolution



CONTENTS



Foreword .......

Explanatory and Abbreviations .

William Prindle, First Settler, and Children

Phoebe- Prindle and Descendants

John- Prindle and Descendants .

Mary^ Prindle and Descendants .

Ebenezer- Prindle and Descendants

Joseph- Prindle and Descendants

Samuel- Prindle and Descendants

Eleazer- Prindle and Descendants

Hannah- Prindle and Descendants

Joseph^ Prindle and Descendants

Joel* Prindle and Descendants

Zalmon^ Prindle and Descendants

Unlocated Branches .....

1. Abijah Prindle ....

2. John Prindle .....



IX

xvii

1

3

20

30

31

49

89

113

137

139

173

176

208
213



Appendix —

Note 1. Sketch of William^ Pringle

Note 2. Military Service and Religious Experience of

Samuel* Prindle ....
Note 3. Kimberly Ancestry ....
Note 4. Military Service and Sketch of Zalmon

Prindle .....

Note 5. ^Military Service and Sketch of Abraham

and Mary Williams ....
Note 6. Cogswell Ancestry ....
Note 7. Oatman Ancestry ....

Note 8. Andrew Ancestry ....

Note 9. Sketch of Sarah Ann^ Prindle .
Note 10. Sketch of Franklin C.^ Prindle .
Note 11. Military Service in Revolutionary War
Note 12. Military Service in French and Indian Wars
Owner's Lineage Record .....
Index .,...•••



227

232
239

243

249
256
260
263
267
269
274
282

287
291



Vll



ILLUSTRATIONS

Franklin Cogswell Prindle . . . Frontispiece

Leather Wallet, carried by Samuel Prindle^ a Revolution-
ary Soldier ..... facing page O'-Z

Mary (Williams) Prindle ... .< <^ jyg

Zenas Prindle ..... .< >< j^g



vm



FOREWORD

"Tell ye your children of it, and let your children tell their
children, and their children another generation." — Joel i., 3.

In attempting to trace the ancient history of his family the
compiler is early confronted with the necessity for sifting facts
from tradition, and while many traditions are interesting and fondly
cherished, often plausible, as well as suggestive and helpful in re-
search, yet the evidence of recorded facts is the only safe guide
in order to make such a compilation of much value. As a matter
of fact, however, instances occur in these pages where traditions of
Revolutionary service have been clues suggesting investigation
which led to their verification by the discovery of recorded facts.

The name of Pringle is of great antiquity, and has been his-
torically eminent in Scotland for many centuries.

Alexander appears to have been the great progenitor of the
family, and he is said to have been one of the promoters of the
Fourth Crusade and commanded one of the divisions of the Scot-
tish soldiers engaged in Palestine.

Sir James Pringle was a Knight of great courage and discre-
tion, and enjoyed the friendship] and favor of King Robert the
Bruce; and was one of the Scottish Knights who accompanied the
great Lord Douglas on the celebrated pilgrimage of the heart of
Robert Bruce. In the arms of all those engaged in that celebrated
pilgrimage, a winged heart has been given as a crest, and it ap-
pears on some of the Pringle coats of arms. The escallop shells
also show that a pilgrimage had been made to Jerusalem.

The origin of the Pringles in America is as yet uncertain, al-
though it is known that our progenitor in this country, William
Pringle, of New Haven, Conn., in 1654, was of Scottish nationality.

No attempt has been made to trace his ancestry across the water.

The name of Pringle frequently appears in the Publications of
the Scottish History Society; and in Vol. 50, entitled "Records of
the Baron Court of Stitchill, 1655-1807," — Edinburg, 1905, there
is given the genealogy of Pringles of Stitchill, from the Pringles
of Snailholm, and Hop Pringle of Craiglatch and Newhall — two
generations prior to William Hop Pringle, 1485, from whom the
descent follows.

ix



X Prindle Genealogy.

These Records comprise the minutes of "The firste Court Barron
holden at Stitchell," beginning January 8, l655, "be the Right
worthy Walter Pringle of Greenkow. In the name of and haveing
full power and commission fra the Right worthy Robert Pringle
of Stitchill, Barroun and heretable proprietor of the Lands, Paro-
chin, and Barrony of Stitchill/' and extending to November 21,
1807. This Baron Court was that of the village, barony and parish
of Stitchill in Roxburgshire, three miles north of Kelso on tlie
river Tweed. Walter Pringle of Greenkow was the second son of
Robert the first laird of Stitchill.

The name of Pringle is found with the Kers, Elliotts, Scotts
and others, all ancient and renowned Border names, who were in
full sympathy with the principles of the Covenant, and exerted un-
dying influence on those living upon their estates. The lairds of
Stitchill were Covenanters and the head of the family (in 1732)
originated the secession in the parish from the Church of Scotland.

There was a "Prindle Hill" near Scrooby, in Nottingham, Eng-
land, the birth-place of Rev. John Davenport, the founder of the
New Haven Colony in 1636, and which suggests that some of the
name lived in that vicinity.

Scrooby Manor was near to the borders, both of Lincolnshire
and Yorkshire, though itself in the County of Nottingham. It was
also an ancient possession and occasional residence of the Arch-
bishop of York, and located a little south of Bawtry, a market and
post town situated on the boundary line between Nottinghamshire
and Yorkshire.

Northumberland is still the home of Pringle families, as also
the southeastern counties of Scotland, just over the border from
Northumberland, where the Pringles of Yair and Whytbank were
neighbors and distant kinsfolk of Sir Walter Scott. There are
many graves of Pringles in Melrose Abbey and church-yard, with
quaint inscriptions and tablets bearing dates from February 28,
1585, to January 13, 1899, the oldest of which is on an effigy lying
on the floor of No. 5 chapel, and reads as follows:

Heir Leis ane Honourabil Man Andro Pringil
Feuar of Galloschiels Quha Decesit ye 28 OF
Februare An. Dom. 1585.

The word Feuar is very common over all parts of Scotland and
elsewhere, and means a person having a long lease of a piece of



Foreword.



XI



ground from another superior at a nominal rent. These leases vary
from 99 years up to say 200 and 300 years, and many houses are
built all over the country on ground taken in such a way. There
are also old inscriptions of several Alexander Pringles, this name
having been transmitted through several generations; and two or
three of John Pringle, the earliest having died April 24, 1675,
aged 72.

The earliest record so far found of Prindles in America is of
John, whose name appears as an "after planter" in Milford, Conn.,
in 1645; and nothing further has yet been found until the name of
William appears in the New Haven Colonial Records, in 1653-4.
And in order to a better understanding of the matter it is desirable
to make a brief reference to some of the events leading up to the
settlement of this Colony, and the appearance of William, whom
we find taking the oath of fidelity to the New Haven Jurisdiction
in 1654.

The early settlers brought with them a high regard for church
and town records, and so noted down with much care and minute-
ness the current facts connected with the family and business life.
Some of these old records may seem of little moment, and even
trivial, to the ordinary reader, but to the historian and genealogist
they are often found to be of great value.

The history of the New Haven Colony begins as early as l635,
when the first steps were taken in the organization of the Daven-
port and Eaton Company, in England and Holland. The Rev.
John Davenport, as pastor of the Church in Coleman Street, Lon-
don, was made to feel the persecuting hand of Archbishop Laud,
and to escape which he sought refuge for a time in Holland. The-
ophilus Eaton, the other founder of this Colony, was a London mer-
chant of means and influence, and is said to have been a member
of the former's congregation. This company was the fourth colony
which had set out for New England, and is mentioned as being
better equipped as to men and means than any of its predecessors.
On arrival at Boston they were urged to join the Massachusetts
Bay Colony. But glowing accounts had reached them from settlers
who had "swarmed" from the Massachusetts Bay Colony, and while
wintering in Boston some of their number had sought for a suitable
location in Connecticut. Fearing that Archbishop Laud might
trouble the Massachusetts Bay Colony if they remained with it,



xii Prindle Genealogy.

and having their own ideas about the management of civil and re-
ligious affairs^ they were moved to decline the invitation as a colony,
though doubtless some individuals may have remained, and others
of the Bay Colony joined the newer enterprise.

So Eaton selected and purchased this tract on Long Island
Sound, and settled upon the mouth of the Connecticut River as
their harbor, being " merchants of Traffick and business. The
Colony was under the conduct of as holy, and as prudent and as
genteel persons as most that ever visited these nooks of America."

The Colony arrived at New Haven, April 14, 1638, and in
June, 1639, after much consideration, proceeded to the organiza-
tion of a civil government. In August following the church was
organized, and Mr. Davenport chosen pastor, and later Mr. Eaton
was made governor. The church at Milford was organized the
same day. The settlement of Guilford, Stamford, Branford, and
Southold, L. I., followed, as families from the various old home
counties naturally gathered together at the different places, and
their numbers were increased from time to time by the later emi-
grants in 1640-45. It is stated that owing to the persecutions of
Laud about nineteen-twentieths of the Puritans that came over ar-
rived in the few years preceding the long Parliament, 1641.

The later settlers, who came to Milford from Wethersfield and
elsewhere, were called "after planters," and it is on this list that
the name of John Prindle is found.

The different plantations were not equally prosperous or har-
monious, but those at New Haven and Milford seem to have been
the most so.

In 1646 Mr. Isaac Allerton, a Mayflower Pilgrim, came to New
Haven from New York. He had been "assistant" to Governor
Bradford, and was a "factour" of the Plymouth Colony some fif-
teen to twenty years before. He was interested in shipping and
made several voyages back and forth to England, exchanging beaver
skins, etc., for other goods needed by the colonists, but was most
active in promoting the formation of new companies of "adven-
turers." Some dissatisfaction among these colonists followed his
management of their affairs and so he removed to New York,
about 1632-34, but later returned to New Haven.

In 1653-4 we find William Pringle mentioned as " the Scotchman
which lives at Mr. Allerton's."



Foreword. xiii

It was the custom to require a young man not living with his
parents to make his home with a householder. Men married young
then, often not waiting long after they were of age, and frequently
marrying before that time; and so William was probably about
twenty-one when he married Mary Desborough, in 1655.

His relationshiiD to John, if any existed, has not been ascer-
tained; nor, as before stated, have any steps yet been taken to
trace his ancestrj^, but it is much to be hoped that the comj^ilation
of this little history may serve to arouse the enthusiasm and interest
of his living descendants to make an earnest and persistent effort
toward ascertaining his parentage and antecedents across the water.
For however humble may have been the lot of our forbears who fled
to New England to pioneer a new land of liberty and freedom,
their names should not be left to perish with the lapse of time.
And ungrateful must be the descendants of these founders, who
have inherited the blessings for which they toiled and suffered to
secure, who will not in some way aid to rescue their names from
oblivion.

The tradition in many families, of the two or three "brothers
who came over," has become so frequent as to excite the smiles of
the incredulous; but when one considers the history of the times,
the facts of homes broken up and families scattered by persecution,
or the desire to better their condition, with one or more venturing
to Holland or America for refuge or in search of a new home, it
should not appear so strange. It would be but most natural for
two or more of the same family to go together, or, if separately,
with the purpose of rejoining later on in the new far-away land.
So when the "three brothers" came over, it might have been at in-
tervals or at the same time, the details of which are now lost in the
distance; but the statement that they "came over" is often the
starting point of the family history in the New World.

The Prindle traditions vary: some say three brothers, some say
two; some say one settled in ^Massachusetts, and one in Connecticut,
and one somewhere else; while others say one in Connecticut, one
in Virginia, and lose the third one; and those that say two, put one
in Connecticut, but are in doubt as to the other.

Remembering the general histories of the Colonies, all these
traditions might be the truth, especially as early records in Massa-
chusetts, Virginia and North Carolina mention Pringles or Prindles



xiv Prindle Genealogy.

whose connection with William of Connecticut has not been traced.
Means of communication were slow and difficult in those early days,
and in most cases families thus scattered soon lost all knowledge of
one another. At a much later period, after the Revolution, some
Tory Prindles went to Canada, and, resuming the Scotch " g " of
the name, lost their identity as Connecticut Prindles almost entirely.
Also several Pringles of the British Army, liking the country, drew
land and remained here.

Tradition also points to Holland, as well as Northumberland
and around Edinburgh, as the place from which the early immi-
grants came. This seems very probable, as Holland was the near-by
refuge of many who looked and longed for America as their future
home.

The story thus far goes to show how meager and uncertain is
our present knowledge of the origin of the Prindles in America.

The only authentic statement yet found is the one referred to
about "the Scotchman" William, of New Haven; and it is concern-
ing him that one of his descendants writes:

" William Pringle was the son of one of the followers of King
James of Scotland and came to America on the restoration of
Charles the Second, and from him the family in the United States
derives its name and descent."

Another descendant writes:

" My aunt tells me that there is a tradition in one branch of the
family that two brothers came over from Scotland. They ran away
on account of a stepmother."

And still another descendant writes:

" There is a tradition in our family that we are descendants of
a Pringle boy who came not many generations ago from Scotland.
His story was told me by my dear grandmother, my father's mother,
who long survived her husband and lived all my boyhood in this
old Prindle home, where I was reared. My grandmother told me
what slie had heard from her husband, of that Scotch boy : that he
was apprenticed in some seaport town to a ship's blacksmith. Liv-
ing in the family of his master he came under the discipline of the
blacksmith's wife, who was wont to chastise him severely. One
day, when the boy had attained considerable size, his mistress was
administering the customary punishment, the boy stooping before
her, his head between her knees, while she was belaboring his pos-
terior parts. The severity of the blows stirred the boy to rebellion,
so gathering all his strength in an effort for freedom, he upset his



Foreword. xv

mistress and escaped. When he had opportunity to consider what
he had done, and the consequences of his rebellious act, he knew it
would never do to fall into the liands of his mistress again, so he
escaped to a ship bound for America."

The original aim of the compiler was to prepare only a brief
family record of his great-grandfather, Zalmon Prindle, who was
a soldier of the American Revolution, and of his descendants, and,
as a slight tribute to his memory, to publish the same for preserva-
tion and distribution among those of his descendants now living who
might desire to have it. Then, as the interest to know more of his
antecedents speedily grew, the investigation was enlarged so as
to embrace the record of his ancestors in the direct line of ascent
to the original emigrant and progenitor of the family in this country.
This in turn led to include also the children of each male ancestor;
and, finally by utilizing the data incidentally accumulated, to en-
large the record so as to include all the descendants of William^ as
far as ascertained, from l654, to those of Zalmon'^ now living, 1906,
during a period of 252 years and embracing ten generations. The
descendants of the several lines and branches other than that of
Zalmon have, however, only been brought down generally to the
sixth generation, and in some lines to the seventh and eighth gen-
erations, but which it is hoped will prove sufficient to enable those
of later generations to connect their own family records with those
of the past. The compiler will feel sufficiently rewarded for his
efforts if these pages shall serve to induce other descendants not
only to make and preserve a careful record of their own families,
but will also undertake the work of completing the history of their
own lines and branches which has failed to find a record here, to
the end that ultimately a full and complete history of the Prindle
family in America can be made.

For the benefit of those descendants of soldiers of the Revolu-
tion who might wish to establish their eligibility to membership in
the patriotic societies, based upon the service of Revolutionary an-
cestors, etc., there will be found in the Appendix, Note 11, a list of
those soldiers whose names appear upon the official records of the
Pension Office, War and Treasury Departments, and of the States
of Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut and New York, together
with a brief transcript of records of service rendered by them in
the achievement of American independence.



xiv Prindle Genealogy.

whose connection with William of Connecticut has not been traced.
Means of communication were slow and difficult in those early days,
and in most cases families thus scattered soon lost all knowledge of
one another. At a much later period, after the Revolution, some
Tory Prindlcs went to Canada, and, resuming the Scotch " g " of
the name, lost their identity as Connecticut Prindles almost entirely.
Also several Pringles of the British Army, liking the country, drew
land and remained here.

Tradition also points to Holland, as well as Northumberland
and around Edinburgh, as the place from which the early immi-
grants came. This seems very probable, as Holland was the near-by
refuge of many wlio looked and longed for America as their future
home.

The story thus far goes to show how meager and uncertain is
our present knowledge of the origin of the Prindles in America.

The only authentic statement yet found is the one referred to
about "the Scotchman" William, of New Haven; and it is concern-
ing him that one of his descendants writes :

" William Pringle was the son of one of the followers of King
James of Scotland and came to America on the restoration of
Charles the Second, and from him the family in the United States
derives its name and descent."

Another descendant writes:

" My aunt tells me that there is a tradition in one branch of the
family that two brothers came over from Scotland. They ran away
on account of a stepmother."

And still another descendant writes:

" There is a tradition in our family that we are descendants of
a Pringle boy who came not many generations ago from Scotland.
His story was told me by my dear grandmother, my father's mother,
wlio long survived her husband and lived all my boyhood in this
old Prindle home, where I was reared. My grandmother told me
MJiat she had Iicard from her husband, of tliat Scotch boy: that he
was apprenticed in some seajjort town to a ship's blacksmith. Liv-
ing in the family of his master he came under the discij^line of the
blacksmith's wile, wlio was wont to chastise him severely. One
(lay, wlitii llif hoy h.id attained considerable size, his mistress was
administering the customary punishment, the boy stooping before
her, l>is liead between her knees, wlule she was belaboring his pos-
terior parts. The severity oC tiie blows stirred the boy to rebellion,
so gatlicriiig all his slrriiglli in ,ui effort for freedom, he upset his



Foreword. xv

mistress and escaped. When he had opportunity to consider what
he had done, and the consequences of his rebellious act, he knew it
would never do to fall into the hands of his mistress again, so he
escaped to a ship bound for America."

The original aim of the compiler was to prepare only a brief
family record of his great-grandfather, Zalmon Prindle, who was
a soldier of the American Revolution, and of his descendants, and,
as a slight tribute to his memory, to publish the same for preserva-
tion and distribution among those of his descendants now living who
might desire to have it. Then, as the interest to know more of his
antecedents speedily grew, the investigation was enlarged so as
to embrace the record of his ancestors in the direct line of ascent
to the original emigrant and progenitor of the family in this country.
This in turn led to include also the children of each male ancestor;
and, finally by utilizing the data incidentally accumulated, to en-
large the record so as to include all the descendants of William^ as
far as ascertained, from 1654, to those of Zalmon"" now living, 1906,
during a period of 252 years and embracing ten generations. The
descendants of the several lines and branches other than that of
Zalmon have, however, only been brought down generally to the
sixth generation, and in some lines to the seventh and eighth gen-
erations, but which it is hoped will prove sufficient to enable those
of later generations to connect their own family records with those
of the past. The compiler will feel sufficiently rewarded for his
efforts if these pages shall serve to induce other descendants not
only to make and preserve a careful record of their own families,
but will also undertake the work of completing the history of their
own lines and branches which has failed to find a record here, to
the end that ultimately a full and complete history of the Prindle
family in America can be made.

For the benefit of those descendants of soldiers of the Revolu-
tion who might wish to establish their eligibility to membership in
the patriotic societies, based upon the service of Revolutionary an-
cestors, etc., there will be found in the Appendix, Note 11, a list of
those soldiers whose names appear upon the official records of the
Pension Office, War and Treasury Departments, and of the States
of Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut and New York, together
with a brief transcript of records of service rendered by them in
the achievement of American independence.



xvi Prindle Genealogy.

The compiler desires to return his sincere thanks to those mem-
bers of the family who have freely rendered assistance in furnishing



Online LibraryFranklin Cogswell PrindleThe Prindle genealogy. embracing the descendants of William Pringle the first settler, in part for six, seven and eight generations, and also the ancestors and descendants of Zalmon Prindle for ten generations, covering a period of two hundred and fifty-two years, 1654-1906 → online text (page 1 of 26)