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Franklin Cogswell Prindle.

The Prindle genealogy. embracing the descendants of William Pringle the first settler, in part for six, seven and eight generations, and also the ancestors and descendants of Zalmon Prindle for ten generations, covering a period of two hundred and fifty-two years, 1654-1906 online

. (page 16 of 26)
Online LibraryFranklin Cogswell PrindleThe Prindle genealogy. embracing the descendants of William Pringle the first settler, in part for six, seven and eight generations, and also the ancestors and descendants of Zalmon Prindle for ten generations, covering a period of two hundred and fifty-two years, 1654-1906 → online text (page 16 of 26)
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own, IJaas. Will was draisn up April - 43, 17^7.
robated Aug. 1, 1797, names eldest eon Solomon
xeoutor, bequeaths to the following oi.ildren
aughter Abigail, Son Solonon, daughter Llartha
allock, son John, Residue of estAte to be equa-
ly divided between sons Solomon and John. In-
sntcry shows 148 aoree of land, which is no

ot the Biroh Hill farm, where the brothers
i/ed and whioh descended to the next genoratior
t is situated olcae to the New York state line
Bd not far froin the Vermont line. It ia iiotewct
©rthy that during Sarly times Mass«, Vermont,
nd New York diajjuted long and fiercely ovar
hese earie boundary lines,

[ ill recorded Pittefield, iJa^is,, Lib. 9, pp. SOB
rKohire Co. Records,



was determined upon the Plains of Abraham, the old route to the
northward from Mass. and Conn., which had for h/ilf a century
been paths of Indian ambush, hand-to-hand conflict, and suchlcn

213



x'^^^-^Lc— - c^




W?^




» ^9»-.=^



JOHN PRINDLE.

About all that is now known of this John Prindle is that he was
a merchant of New Milford, Conn., from which place he removed,
with his two sons Solomon and John, to Williamstown, Mass., and
settled on Birch Hill. And as they were among the early settlers
of Williamstown, and their descendants have been identified with
its history, some brief reference to its early days may be found
interesting.

After the peace of Aix-la-Chapelle, in 1748, which resulted in
the temporary closing of the old French wars the following year,
the General Court caused a survey to be made of the extreme
northwestern corner of Massachusetts, and laid down the lines of
two townships adjoining one another and called them East and
West Hoosac, after the name of the river flowing through that
valley. East Hoosac was the one first reached by the old Mohawk
trail, the then only route of travel from the Deerfield to the Hoosac
over the Hoosac mountain. Fort Massachusetts, the most west-
erly and important of the forts established between the Connecti-
cut and Hoosac Rivers, was located on or near the line dividing
these two townships, and in September, 1752, Capt. Ephraim
\jTiu^ ii - • command of this fort, bought two house lots in

fifteen more were bought by his officers and men.

the French and Indian wars nearly all the officers
their military service — the young men from

jeing about equal in numbers.

■s at Crown Point became more serious Capt.

red with his command to the assistance of Fort

1 within about four miles of the fort they ran

nd Capt. Williams was killed at the first fire,
found that in his will he had made a bequest
\ % free school at West Hoosac, provided that when
mcor^Dorated aT a town the name should be changed to Williams-
town.

Upon the ending of the French dominion in America, which
was determined upon the Plains of Abraham, the old route to the
northward from Mass. and Conn., which had for h/ilf a century
been paths of Indian ambush, hand-to-hand conflict, and sudden

213




i^




■%■




JOHN PRINDLE. fi^^ '

About all that is now known of this John Prindle is that he was
a merchant of New Milford, Conn., from which place he removed,
with his two sons Solomon and John, to Williamstown, Mass., and
settled on Birch Hill. And as they were among the early settlers
of Williamstown, and their descendants have been identified with
its history, some brief reference to its early days may be found
interesting.

After the peace of Aix-la-Chapelle, in 1748, which resulted in
the temporary closing of the old French wars the following year,
the General Court caused a survey to be made of the extreme
northwestern corner of Massachusetts, and laid down the lines of
two townships adjoining one another and called them East and
West Hoosac, after the name of the river flowing through that
valley. East Hoosac was the one first reached by the old Mohawk
trail, the then only route of travel from the Deerfield to the Hoosac
over the Hoosac mountain. Fort Massachusetts, the most west-
erly and important of the forts established between the Connecti-
cut and Hoosac Rivers, was located on or near the line dividing
these two townships, and in September, 1752, Capt. Ephraim
Williams, then in command of this fort, bought two house lots in
West Hoosac, and fifteen more were bought by his officers and men.
At the renewal of the French and Indian wars nearly all the officers
and men resumed their military service — the young men from
Mass. and Conn, being about equal in numbers.

As the troubles at Crown Point became more serious Capt.
Williams was ordered with his command to the assistance of Fort
Edward, but when within about four miles of the fort they ran
into an ambush, and Capt. Williams was killed at the first fire.
It was afterwards found that in his will he had made a bequest
for the support of a free school at West Hoosac, provided that when
incorporated as a town the name should be changed to Williams-
town.

Upon the ending of the French dominion in America, which
was determined upon the Plains of Abraham, the old route to the
northward from Mass. and Conn., which had for \\h\i a century
been paths of Indian ambush, hand-to-hand conflict, and sudden

213



214 Prindle Genealogy.

death, became at once open and safe. And as West Hoosac was
on the direct route of the expeditions to Ticonderoga and Crown
Point, it is no wonder that officers and men, remembering this quiet
valley, surrounded b}' those grand hills so well wooded and watered,
afterward turned their faces thither to seek new homes. Prior to
the incorporation of Williamstown, in 1765, comparatively few of
the settlers came from the eastward over the rugged Hoosac Moun-
tain, and it is noteworthy that with the exception of those who had
served at the fort as soldiers nearly all the newcomers from Conn,
were from the northwestern part, and from around Litchfield
County as a center. In that year Rev. Whitman Welch, a native
of iNIilford, Conn., but later, after the death of his father, living
with an uncle in New Milford, where he married Marvin Gaylord,
a daughter of Dea. Gaylord, was called to the charge of the new
church at Williamstown. This young minister was much beloved
by the people, and during his ten years' pastorate he kept in close
touch with New Milford, and a goodly number of citizens from
both Milford and New Milford followed him to Williamstown,
where he helped them in establishing new homes. Among these
early settlers are found the names of many prominent Conn, fam-
ilies, as Noble's, Boardman's, Deming's, Johnson's and Prindle's.

Just when John Prindle sold his store in New jNIilford, and
came with his two sons to join his former townsmen who had pre-
ceded him, is not now definitely known, but from the " Proprietors'
Book " we learn that about the year 1790 the 60-acre lot on Birch
Hill had been drawn in favor of house lot 54, and it was upon this
lot that John and his two sons built their new home. Here Solomon
and John, Jr., married Sarah and Penelope Johnson, sisters, and
reared their families under the old roof-tree which they themselves
had helped to build.

About 1832 Solomon and Sarah, with their daughter Almira,
who had married Henry Babcock, left the New England hills for
the then " far west," and settled on a farm in Kalamazoo, Mich.,
where he lived until his death, and where his grandson Henry Bab-
cock now lives.

John and Penelope remained on Birch Hill Farm, where he died
in 1837, aged 6l years.

So far all efforts to trace the parentage and early history of
this John Prindle, Sr., have been unsuccessful, and the foregoing



Unlocated Branches, 215

is here noted with the hope that it may lead to further informa-
tion from some source, and Avhich will be most gladly received and
appreciated by his descendants.
His children were:

1. Solomon-, b. ; rem. from New Milford, Conn., to

Williamstown, Mass., where he m. Sarah Johnson, and
lived on Birch Hill; rem. abt. 1805 to Middlebury, N. Y.;
ret. abt. 1810 to Williamstown, and abt. 1832 rem. to
Kalamazoo, Mich., where he d. in 1835.
Children :

1. RACHEL^ b. Williamstown, June 2, 1799; m. (1) Wil-

liamstown, Mass., 1817, Thomas Stewart; m. (2)
Williamstown, New York, 1832, Jacob Miller; d.
Lake Geneva, Wis., Aug., 1856.
Children hy first marriage:

1. Maria Stewart\ b. 1819; m. Samuel Wing; d.

Lake Geneva, April, 1905, s.p.

2. Martha M. Stewart^ b. ; m. Harrison Rich;

d. Lake Geneva, 1892. 7 ch. Marshall'', Rosa-
mond", Frances^ George^, and three others.

3. Jane Stewart*, m. Wells A. Laflin ; d. Lake Geneva,

1904, s.p.

4. Solomon Prindle Stewart*, m. Mary Allen. 1 ch.

Belief m. Hurlburt; res. Sebastopol, Cali-
fornia.

5. Thomas Stewart*, m. Mary Murphy. 5 ch. Charles

Prindle^ Frank E.% Rosa', Sally' and Solomon-'.
Children hy second marriage:

6. Abby Miller*, b. June 27, 1833; m. Fuller;

res. Racine, Wis. 4 ch. Henry E.', b. Oct. 10,
1856; Nellie N.^ b. 1861; d. 1864; Jessie'', d.i.,
and Lucy^, d.i.

2. ALMIRA•^ b. Middlebury, N. Y., abt. 1809-10; m. Will-

iamstown, Mass., 1831, Jonathan Babcock; rem. nht.

1832, to Kalamazoo, Mich. 4 ch., one of whom, Henry

Babcock*, res. Kalamazoo.
2. John-, b. New Milford, Conn, (prob.) abt. 1775-6; m.
Williamstown, 1805, Penelope Johnson, who was b. 1790,
and d. 1865, sister of Sarah, who m. his bro. Solomon;



216 Prindle Genealogy.

rem. from New Milford, Conn., to Williamstown, Mass.,
where he lived on Birch Hill Farm, and d. there Feb.,
18S7, ae. 61.

Children, horn in W illiamstown :
1. HuLDAH^ b. Dee. 25, 1806; m. 1825, Elijah Lamb;
d. 1833.

Children :

1. Eliza Janet Lamb^ b. April 7, 1828; m. (1) July

4, 1865, Edwin Blair; m. (2) Dec. 21, 1880,
James Blake; d. Jan. 1, 1903. 1 ch. Theresa
Almeda, m. Nov. 19, 1872, William R. Carpenter;
res. Pittsfield, Mass.

2. John Edwin Lamb*, b. Sept. 4, 1830; m. Jan. 2,

1853, Jane Daniels; res. Williamstown.

Children:

1. F. Bell Lamb^ b. May 13, 1858; m. Feb. 7, 1884,

Edward C. Young. 3 ch. John Lamb, b. Oct.
5, 1887; Don L., b. May 6, 1891; Henry A., b.
Feb. 9, 1895.

2. Eva D. Lamb% b. Jan. 24, 1863; m. Jan., 1886,

Henry E. Hopper; res. New York. 2 ch. Win-
nifred B., b. Jan. 9, 1888; Guy G.", b. March 24,
1890.

3. Jennie M. Lamb^ b. May 16, 1865; m. Nov. 12,

1889, Elmer B. Vars; d. Berlin, N. Y., Feb. 25,
1898. 1 ch. Olive Jane, b. Feb. 25, 1898.

4. John E. Lamb^ Jr., b. April 18, 1867; m. Nov.,

1892, Josie Robinson. 4 ch. Matilda B., b. Oct.
9, 1893; Henry H., b. June 28, 1895; Jennie M.,
b. Oct. 26, 1899, and Grace E., b. Aug. 9, 1903.

5. Bert E. Lamb^ b. Aug. 16, 1869; m. May 9, 1893,

Blanche Vars; d. Dec. 14, 1897.

6. Robert E. Lamb^ b. April 23, 1873; m. March

22, 1894, Martha Whitney. 4 ch. Hazel Louisa,
b. March 4, 1896; Vera Whitney, b. June 10,
1899; Marion Helen, b. Jan. 28, 1901, and
Doris Gertrude, b. Aug. 3, 1904.

7. Louis G. Lamb\ b. Jan. 24, 1876; m. Aug. 7,



Unlocated Branches. 217

1900, Ella C. Galusha. 2 ch. Galusha, b. Oct.
26, 1901, and Ruth Adaline, b. April 29, 1903.

2. Eliza^ b. March 24, 1807; d. June 7, 1811.

3. Sarah Ann^ b. Williamstown, Dec. 1-1, 1811; m. (1)

March 13, 1834, Erastus C. Smith; m. (2) 1852,
Dewitt C. Smith; d. Berlin, X. Y., July 5, 1897.
Children :

1. Robert W. Smith*, b. North Adams, Mass., March

7, 1835; m. ; res. Hornellsville, N. Y.

2. Mary M. Smith\ b. Williamstown, Sept. 14, 1837;

d. Aug. 20, 1859.

3. Frances Maria Smith*, b. Texas, Mich., June 19,

1840; m, Marion, Iowa, Sept. 5, 1870, Lester
S. Cowdrey.

Children:

1. John* Parley Cowdrey^ b. Oct. 31, 1871; d.

Americus, Kan., June 20, 1872.

2. Rosa Isabella Cowdrey^, b. Americus, Kan., May

21, 1873; m. March 27, 1900, Orville Viele ;
Berlin, N. Y.

3. Sarah Antoinette Cowdrey^, b. Robin, Benton

Co., la., March 12, 1876; m. June 22, 1904,
Merton Bly; res. East Poestenkill, N. Y. 1 ch.
Carl Alden Bly"% b. March 30, 1905.

4. Rollin H. Smith*, b. June, 1842; d. July, 1851.

4. JoHN^ Jr., b. Feb. 20, 1815; m. Williamstown, 1842,

Cornelia Walley; rem. to Sharon, Wis.; d. Jan. 1, 1891-

Children :

1. Franklin*, b. Aug. 15, 1843; d. Feb. 26, 1862, while

in service as soldier of the Civil war.

2. Stephen W.*, b. Sept. 21, 1845; m. Dec. 29, 1867,

Mary H. Billington; res. Belvidere, 111.

Child:
1. Charles W.^ b. March 3, 1879; m. Feb. 25, 1903,
Grace Bird. 1 ch. John Walley, b. April 11,
1904.

3. Juniata*, b. June 3, 1849; m. Nov. 13, 1867,

Wheeler H. Stevens; res. Sharon, Wis.



218 Prindle Genealogy.

Child :
1. Carrie B. Stevens^ b. Dec. 8, 1870; m. Sept. 28,

1897, Dr. M. V. Dewine. 1 cli. Donald S.,
b. Aug. 31, 1900.

4. Alida B. H.-*, b. Dee. 1, 1855; April 3, 1873, Stephen

M. Warren; res. Sharon, Wis.

Children:

1. Willis M. Warren-', b. May 27, 1879; m. Dec. 28,

1898, Grace Merriott. 3 ch. Gertrude, b. Dec.
15, 1899; Pearl, b. Sept., 1901, and Clifford,
b. Oct. 19, 1902.

2. Mabel J. Warren% b. April 20, 1881; m. Dec. 7,

1898, Wesley E. Noble. 2 ch. Marcia M., b.
June 15, 1901, and Harold N., b. April 19, 1904.

3. Jesse E. Warren^ b. April 15, 1883; m. Nov. 7,

1904, Agnes Erickson. 1 ch. Lester E., b. Aug.
19, 1905.

5. Martha J.\ b. Aug. 26, 1859; m. March, 1874,

Charles S. Raymond; res. Reading, Pa.
Children :

1. John W. Raymond', b. July 12, 1878; m. Jan.,

1900, Mamie Landis; res. Burlington, Iowa. 2 ch.
Clarence and Bernice (twins), b. Feb., 1902.

2. Mary Raymond", b. May, 1880; res. Kalamazoo,

Mich.

3. Maud S. Raymond^ b. June, 1882.

5. Parley J.", b. June 23, 1817; m. Hoosac Falls, N. Y.,
March 7, 1848, Wealthy Nichols, who was b. Jan. 13,
1822, and d. Feb. 23, 1902; d. Oct. 30, 1871.
Children :
1. Mary*, b. Dec. 11, 1849; m. Feb. 24, 1870, George
Edward Brockway; res. Salem, N. Y.
Children :
1. Ella A. Brockway^ b. Jan. 24, 1872; m. Oct. 18,
1892, Chauncey Boughton Hawley; res. Half
Moon, N. Y. 4 ch. Edward B., b. April 17,
1894; Harold A., b. Aug. 12, 1895; Esther H.
b. Jan. 15, 1898, and Helen B., b. Aug. 15, 1905.



Unlocated Branches. 219

2. Maud B. Brockway% b. Sept. 26, 1877; d. Oct.

25, 1882.

3. George Edward Brockway^ Jr., b. Oct. 25, 1883.

2. John F.^ b. Sept. 15, 1851; m. Feb. 14, 1877, Lucy

A. Bridges.

Children :

1. Carl E.% b. Feb. 21, 1879; m. June 6, 1901,

Nellie McQuade; druggist; res. Boston, Mass.
2 ch. Parker, b. Feb. 25, 1903, and Harold, b.
April 22, 1905.

2. Cable H.% b. July 7, 1881; m. Sept. 29, 1901,

Leona Church ; res. Williamstown. 1 ch. Helene,
b. Aug. 12, 1902.

3. GuY^ b. July 4, 1890.

4. Gertrude^ b. Jan. 7, 1892.

3. George Henry*, b. Feb. 23, 1854; m. Oct. 14, 1874,

Lizzie Southworth; res. Williamsto-vvn.

Children:

1. Sumner Increase^, b. Oct. 27, 1875,

2. Eugene PARLEy% b. July 17, 1878; m. Nov. 27,

1901, Bessie Viola Belding; res. Williamstown.
1 ch. Eugene Winthrop, b. June 12, 1903.

3. Julia Beth^ b. April 3, 1882.

4. George Henry", Jr., b. Sept. 5, 1894; res. Wil-

liamstown.
Marshall Eaton", b. May 13, 1819; m. (1) Nov,
28, 1843, Maria Brown; m. (2) Dec. 10, 1862, Caro-
line Lamphier; res. Birch Hill Farm, Williamstown,
Mass.

Children, by 1st marriage:
1. Lucy Adaline*, b. Oct. 8, 1844; m. March 4, 1866,
James Goodrich; res. Williamstown.

Children:
1. Florence Eugenia Goodrich^ b. Jan. 25, 1867;
m. Feb. 8, 1885, Herbert Moone; res. Williams-
town, 6 ch. Herbert Dewey, b. Dec. 25, 1885;
Herbert Kennedy, b. June 7, 1888; Lena, b.
June 9, 1892; Clyde Allen, b. March 12, 1894;



220 Prindle Genealogy.

Walter Wilson, b. April 27, 1899, and Roy
Goodrich, b. April l6, 1904.

2. Fanny Augusta^ b. Sept. 20, 1846; res. Williams-

town.

3. John Clinton*, b. Aug. 19, 1848; m. June, 1872,

Cynthia Danforth; d. Williamstown, May 19, 1895.

Children:

1. Charles F.% b. July 10, 1873; m. May, 1901,

Mary Furkhardt; d. Williamstown, May 19, 1895.
1 ch. b. and d. 1904.

2. Mattie BELLE^ b. Oct., 1879. 3. Maud Cynthia%

b. July 9, 1884. 4. Mabel Maria^ b. April 18,
1886. 5. MARGERY^ b. July, 1888. 6. RoNALD^
b. July, 1893, and FRANCES^ b. Sept., 1894.

4. Edward Marshall^ b. July 30, 1850; m. March 5,

1873, Hattie Atherton; d. Oct. 5, 1877. 1 ch.
Hattie Louisa^, b. Oct. 6, 1876; res. Pownal, Vt.

5. Benjamin Franklin*, b. Sept. 2, 1852; d. in infancy.

6. James Parley*, b. Aug. 3, 1854; d. 1877.

7. Charles Hosford*, b. May 13, 1856; m. Jan. 10,

1876, Alice Chamberlain; res. Williamstown.

Child:
1. Frederick Legrand^ b. Aug. 25, 1878; m. 1900,
Mary Danforth. 2. Irma ALICE^ b. April 27,
1891. 3. Raymond.

Children, by 2nd marriage: ^

8. E. Franklin*, b. Oct. 9, 1863; m. Oct. 2, 1887,

Augusta Myers; res. Beloit, Wis.

Child:
1. Arthur B.^ b. Oct. 12, 1888. 2. Marshall E.^
2nd, b. July 14, 1892. 3. Jessica M.% b. April
23, 1894.

9. Jennie Adele*, b. Nov. 22, 1865; res. Williamstown.
10. Jessica Cole*, b. Nov. 7, 1870; m. Dec. 28, 1893,

Samuel Humes, of Jersey Shore, Pa., who was b.
Oct. 25, 1870, and d. Sept. 30, 1904; res. Jersey
Shore, Pa.



Unlocated Branches. 221

Child:

1. Margaret Prindle^ b. Dec. 2, 1894. 2. Hamilton
MarshalP, b. May 8, 1896; d. July 9, 1897. 3.
SamueP, Jr., b. Jan. 29, 1901.
11. Clarence Harvey^ b. May 6, 1876; m. March,
1905, Flora Maynard. 1 ch. Caroline Cole°, b.
Nov. 19, 1905.
7. Clarissa Adaline^ b. May 13, 1821; m. Dec. 28, 1842,
Daniel B. Galusha; d. Feb. 29, 1904; res. Williams-
town.

Children:

1. Lyman Henry Galusha^ b. Aug. 30, 1844; m. Jan.
17, 1866, Sarah Jane Hickox; res. Williamstown.

Children :

1. Chauncey L. Galusha^, b. Nov. 6, 1866; m. April

12, 1889, Susan Turner. 2 ch. Lyman, b. July
15, 1891; d. Feb. 16, 1902, and Dexter, b.
April 21, 1905.

2. Grace Lillian Galusha^, b. Nov. 2, 1867; m. Oct.

8, 1887, H. Dexter Bailey; d. March 21, 1891.

2 ch. Bierce, b. July 20, 1888, and Beulah, b.
Feb. 27, 1891.

3. George Arthur Galusha% b. Oct. 4, 1868; m. Oct.

27, 1890, Ella May Newell; res. Troy, N. Y.

3 ch. Gertrude, b. Nov. 2, 1891; Newell, b.
Aug. 5, 1893, and Alta, b. March 1, 1898.

4. Harry Parley Galusha% b. Sept. 1, 1871.

5. Linnaeus Hickox Galusha% b. July 29, 1874;

m. Oct. 15, 1900, Delia Brooks; res. Williams-
town.

2. Eliza Harriet Galusha^, b. Jan. 18, 1846; m. Sept.

7, 1870, Seth H. Phelps; res. Williamstown. 2 ch.
Ruth G.% h. July 9, 1871, and Abbie% b. Dec. 13,
1873.

3. Ellen Galusha^ b. Jan. 4, 1848; m. Jan. 3, 1881,

Luther E. Noyce; res. Williamstown. 1 ch.
Helen% b. May 25, 1884.



222 Prindle Genealogy.

4. Frank Prindle Galusha\ b. June 6, 1850; m. (1)

Nov. 25, 1876, Mary Navin; m. (2) Jan. 15, 1891,
Delilah Shanahan; res. Troy, N. Y.

5. Mark Galusha*, b. April 30, 1852; m. Nov. 6, 1873,

Cora E. Green; d. July 19, 1885.

Children:

1. Arthur G. Galusha^ b. July 14, 1874; m. Nov.

12, 1897, Helen Cook; res. Williamstown. 2 ch.
Mark Hampton, b. May 1, 1899, and Walter
John, b. March 10, 1892.

2. Charles M. GalushaS b. July 19, 1876; m. Jan.

31, 1899, Beulah Snyder; res. Williamstown. 1
ch. Anna Beatrice, b. Jan. 3, 1902.

3. Ella Cornelia Galusha'', b. March 17, 1879; m.

Aug. 7, 1900, Louis G. Lamb^; res. Williams-
town. 2 ch. Galusha Lamb, b. Oct. 26, 1901,
and Ruth Adaline Lamb, b. April 29, 1903.

Note. — These two ch. are of the same gen-
eration in both lines of descent from Huldah^
and Clarissa Adaline^.

4. Mamie Albina Galusha^ b. Jan. 23, 1886.

6. Daniel Galusha^ b. July 19, 1854; m. Oct. 24, 1878,

Mary Emma Green; res. Williamstown.

Children :
1. Daniel Jones% b. Dec. 4, 1880. 2. Edward
Marcellus% b. Dec. 22, 1884. 3. BelP, b. Dec.

13, 1886. 4. Anna^ b. Oct. 16, 1889; d. May 9,

1890. 5. Grace^ b. April 26, 1891.

7. Charles S. Galusha*, b. Sept. 13, 1856; m. May 12,

1886, Hattie Bell Cleveland; res. Windsor, Mass.

Children :
1. Charles DanieP, b. Aug. 17, 1888. 2. Martha^
b. Jan. 1, 1890. 3. Clara Eliza^ b. April 12,

1891. 4. George Cleveland^ b. June l6, 1892.
5. Donald B.^ b. Jan. 26, 1894. 6. Marion
Edith% b. March l6, 1896. 7. Dorothy Prindle^
b. March 2, 1898. 8. Lyman Arthur^ b. Nov.

14, 1899. 9. Aureha MilHcent^ b. Oct. 13, 1901.



Unlocated Branches. 223

8. Ida Galusha*, b. Jan. 1, 1858; m. March 17, 1877,

Charles S. Bridges; res. Williamstown.
Childreji:
1. Mabel Carrie^ b. June 5, 1881. 2. Bernards
b. March 17, 1884. 3. Grace LillianS b. Sept.
9, 1886. 4. Danforth Frederick^ b. Sept. 9,
1889.

9. Abbie Galusha*, b. March 30, 1861; res. Williams-

town.
10. Jennie GalushaS b. Aug. 28, 1864; res. Williams-
town.

8. Lyman Douglas^ b. May 4, 1823; m. ; rem. to

Glenwood, Iowa; grad. Williams College, 1847. Had
4 ch. of whom Henry A.% b. Nov. 11, 1866; res.
Memphis, Neb., and has 3 ch., Florence^ b. 1895;
Charles^ b. 1900, and WalterS b. 1905.

9. Edward Franklin^ b. Oct. 4, 1828; went West, mar-

ried Mary Jane Marsh, and now resides in Achilles,
Kansas. 7 ch., 3 dec'd.



Note. — The foregoing record was furnished by Mrs. Samuel
Humes (Jessica Cole Prindle), of Jersey Shore, Pa., who will be
very glad to receive any further information concerning this family,
and particularly as to the parentage of this John Prindle, who came
to Williamstown from New Milford, Conn.



APPENDIX



APPENDIX



NOTE 1.

The name of William Pringle^ the emigrant and progenitor
of the Prindle family traced in this volume, first appears in
America, in the Colonial Records of New Haven, Conn., in 1653-54,
where he is referred to as "the Scotchman which lives at Mr.
Allerton's."

He took the oath of fidelity to the New Haven Jurisdiction,
Theophilus Eaton, Governor, on April 4, 1654; married Mary
Desborough, December 7, 1656; and, after living for some time in
New Haven, bought about 1672, from the administrators of the
estate of Sergeant Thos. Jeffreys, 24 acres of land in what is now
West Haven, but then really a part of New Haven, and known
as "West Farms," and settled there. This land lies between what
is now Main and Elm Streets, and Second and Third Avenues, and
the old house formerly stood in Second Avenue near Main Street.
A part of this land is now owned and occupied by the children of
Rollin W. and Lugevia (Prindle) Hine, descendants of the 8th
generation, and lies opposite their present home. His name is not
found on a list of residents of New Haven, 1640-50.

These brief items tell nearly all that is now known of William
Pringle, but much more is needed to satisfy the interest in the
progenitor of a family, and we find considerable information of
value in the general history of the times and customs of the people
where he dwelt.

Isaac Allerton was a passenger on the "Mayflower," and "was
chosen to be an Assistante unto" Gov. Bradford for many years in
succession. He was sent several times to England and to Holland
to dispose of furs and other products of the Colony and given "full
power to conclude the former bargains with ye adventurers." Hav-
ing been given so much power some cause for dissatisfaction would
naturally arise, and about l632 his connection with the Plymouth
Colony was severed, though he was not until several years after a
settler of New Haven.

The New Haven Colony arrived at New Haven in the spring of
l638, having passed the winter in Boston, and was composed prin-
cipally of members of the church and congregation of which the
Rev. John Davenport was pastor, in Coleman Street, London. They
came provided with means and "men skilled in various arts," and

237



228 Prindle Genealogy.

Cotton Mather writes 'The Colony was under the conduct of as
holy, and as prudent, and as genteel persons as most that ever
visited these nooks of America."

Mr. Allerton came to New Haven to stay about 1646, and built
a handsome house "all of oak and the best of joiner work," having
four porches and equal in every respect to that of the Governor.
The intervening years were probably spent in New York where he
continued his trading, though the final settlement of his affairs
with the Plymouth Colony dragged along for several years.

He was married three times, his first wife being Mary, the
daughter of Elder Brewster, whose account of Mr. Allerton's rela-
tions to the Plymouth Colony is quaint and interesting, and gives
us an idea of the man and his character, although he is mentioned
only at long intervals in the Elder's diary.

"Besides, through private gaine, I doe persuade my
selfe, was some cause to lead Mr. Allerton aside in thse beginnings,
yet I thinke, or at least charitie caries me to hope, that he intended
to deale faithfully with them in ye maine, and had such an opinion
of his own abilitie, and some experience . . . as he conceived
he might both raise himselfe an estate, and allso be a means to


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Online LibraryFranklin Cogswell PrindleThe Prindle genealogy. embracing the descendants of William Pringle the first settler, in part for six, seven and eight generations, and also the ancestors and descendants of Zalmon Prindle for ten generations, covering a period of two hundred and fifty-two years, 1654-1906 → online text (page 16 of 26)