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Franklin Cogswell Prindle.

The Prindle genealogy. embracing the descendants of William Pringle the first settler, in part for six, seven and eight generations, and also the ancestors and descendants of Zalmon Prindle for ten generations, covering a period of two hundred and fifty-two years, 1654-1906 online

. (page 20 of 26)
Online LibraryFranklin Cogswell PrindleThe Prindle genealogy. embracing the descendants of William Pringle the first settler, in part for six, seven and eight generations, and also the ancestors and descendants of Zalmon Prindle for ten generations, covering a period of two hundred and fifty-two years, 1654-1906 → online text (page 20 of 26)
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in South Britain, Conn., May 3, 1767; married March 6, 1786,
Mrs. Phcbe (Hawley) Bristol, widow of Gideon Bristol, who was
born in Roxbury, Conn., Jan. 22, 1766, and died May 18, 1838.
They lived in Sandgate, Vt. He died in Fosterville, N. Y., in 1836.

He was a soldier of the American Revolution, his name ap-
pearing as follows upon



Appendix. 259

"A Pay Roll of Capt. Richard Kurd's Company in Col. Ira

Allen's Regiment of militia in an alarm to the Northward, Oct. 20,

1781.

*****

"Pheris (Ferris) Cogswell; 17 days in service; pay and sub-
sistence, 1.2.0; miles traveled, 52; amt. travel at 4d per mile, 17.4;

total, 2.0.0.

*****

"Richard Hurd, Captain.
"Bennington, Dec. 3, 1781. — Personally appears Capt. Rich<i
Hurd and made solemn oath that the above pay roll is just and
true. "Isaac Titchenor, Justice Peace."

— Vermont Revolutionary Rolls, p. 457.
Children:

8. i. Hannah, b. Aug. l6, 1786; m. Zenas Prindle^; d. Sept.

6, 1842.
ii. Urana, b. Aug. 5, 1788; d. unm.
iii. Hawley, b. Sept. 10, 1790; d. May 16, 1791.

9. iv. Phebe, b. April 9, 1792; m. Joel PrindleS' d. Nov. 19,

1819.
V. Samuel, b. Aug. 9, 1794; m. Joanna Smith; d. 1871.
vi. Martin, b. Aug. 28, 1796; m. Sept. 4, 1816, Marcia Tuttle;

d. 1852.
vii. Lydia, b. Oct. 18, 1798; m. March 25, 1828, John Adams;

' d. March 22, 1874.
viii. Asa Hawley, b. Aug. 17, 1800; d. unm.
ix. Sarah, b. Dec. 23, 1802; m. Joseph Sudsworth.
X. Franklin Ferris, b. Aug. 19, 1806; m. Polly Kimberly; d.

Jan. 15, 1870.

8. HANNAH COGSWELL.

Hannah Cogswell was born in Sandgate, Vt., Aug. l6, 1786;
married Zenas Prindle^ (Zalmon^, JoeP, Joseph^, Ehenezer^,
William^) , son of Zalmon and Mary (Williams) Prindle, who was
born in Tarrytown, N. Y., April 17, 1786, died in Sandgate, Oct.
14, 1872, and was buried there. She died in Sandgate, Sept. 6,
1842, leaving two sons and three daughters, and was buried there.

9. PHEBE COGSWELL. ^

Phebe Cogswell, was born in Sandgate, Vt, April 9, 1892;
maried Joel Prindle® {Zalmon^, Joel*, Joseph^, Ebenezer^, Will-
iam^), son of Zalmon and Mary (Williams) Prindle, who was
born in Sandgate, Aug. l6, 1789- She died Nov. 19, 1819, leaving
one daughter, Maria, who married William LeVere, and was buried
in West Sandgate.

For a full account of this family, and its English History, see
Jameson's " Cogswells in America."



NOTE 7.

Oatman Ancestry of the Descendants of Hawley Prindle.

1. JOHN OATMAN.
John Outman (Oatman)^, of Stratford, Conn., married (1) Dec.
31, 1725, Elizabeth Janes, daughter of William and Sarah (Clark)
Janes, of New Haven, Conn., who was born Nov. 5, 1695, and (2)
May, 1747, Mrs. Elizabeth (Smith) Bennett, widow of William
Bennett.

Children:
i. Phebe, bapt. Dec. 25, 1726.
2. ii. George, bapt. (prob. abt. 1728).
iii. Anne, bapt. April, 1731.
iv. Sarah, bapt. Oct., 1732.
V. Deborah, bapt. Aug., 1739-

2. GEORGE OATMAN.
George Oatman, who was probably the son of John and Eliza-
beth (Janes) Outman, of Stratford, Conn., married Ruth

who was born about 1735, and died in Arlington, Vt., in 1824
ae. 89 yrs. He settled in the parish of Ripton, North Stratford
and after 1761 removed to Arlington, Vt., where he died in 1793
ae. 72 yrs. His will dated Feb. 1, 1793, and probated Aug. 5
1793, names four sons and four daughters as beneficiaries, viz.
Samuel, George, Benjamin, and Isaac, and Freelove Andrews
Desire Graves, Sarah Clark, and Phoebe Orton.
Children :
i. Daniel, b. May 11, 1747, bapt. July — , 1747; m. Mary
Spencer; d. Arlington, Vt., March 4, 1803, ae. 55 yrs.
9 mos. and 23 days (gr. st.). She died there in 1828.
ii. Samuel, b. abt. 1748; m. April 12, 1769, Hannah Wooster;
resided in Oxford, Conn. ; rem. later to Arlington, Vt.,
where he died Sept. 28, 1825, ae. 77 yrs.
iii. John, bapt. 1750.
iv. Ruth, bapt. Aug. 1753.

V. George, Jr., b. ; rem. from Arlington to Middle-
town, Vt., abt. 1785, where he d. abt. 1836, having
" lived to be an old man." He had a family of three
sons: Eli, Eliakim, and Lyman. He was "a brave
soldier of the Revolution," and his name appears as
such on a Pay Roll of Capt. M. Lyon's Company of
Alarm list for service done in 1780. October Alarm. —
(Vermont Revolntionary Rolls, 1775-1783.)

A fuller account of this family may be found in the
History of Middletown, Vt., by Barnes Frisbee, 1867-

260



Appendix. 261

vi. Benjamin^ b. . He served in the Revolutionary war,

his name appearing on a Pay Roll of Capt. Jonas
Galusha's Company, in Col. Herrick's Regt., for service
done in the Alarm in Oct., 1780. — (Vt. Revolutionary
Rolls, 1775-83.)

3. vii. Isaac, b. ; m. Anna ; d. Aug. 11, 1831.

viii. Freelove, b. .

ix. Desire, b. ; m. Graves; d. .

X. Sarah, b. ; m. Clark; d. .

xi. Phoebe, b. ; m. Orton; d. .



3. ISAAC OATMAN.

Isaac Oatman was born in Arlington, Vt., — ; m. Anna

-, who was born, Feb. 1, 1765, and died Arlington, Jmie 29,



1824, ae. 6i yrs. 4 mos. 14 days. He died Arlington, Aug. 11,
1831, ae. 79 (gr. St.); and both were buried in St. James church-
yard there.

His will, dated Feb. 19, and probated Oct. 5, 1831, names the
following beneficiaries : wife Anna ; sons Alvah, Arnold, Luther,
Elisha, Selden, and Reuben B.; daughters Phoebe, Ruth, Patty,
Polly, Sally, and Abigail; and granddaughter Sarah Ann Oatman
(dau. of Alvah).

She was a communicant of St. James P. E. Church in 1814,
and he in 1826.

He served in the Revolutionary war, his name appearing on
the " Pay Roll of Capt. E. Wallis' Company of Militia for service
done in the year 1780. Paid at Arlington, Nov. 18, 1782." Also
on " Pay Roll of a part of Capt. Elijah Galusha's Company of
Militia in the town of Arlington, who marched for the defense
of the frontiers of the State of Vermont in the month of October,
1781. Arlington, July 1st, 1782." — Vermont Revolutionary Rolls,
1775-1783.

Children:
i. Phoebe, b. .



ii. Alvah, b. Nov. 17, 1778; m. Amelia Ames; d. .

iii. Arnold, b. .

iv. Luther, b. .

V. Elisha, b. .

vi. Selden, b. .

vii. Reuben B., b. ; m. Oct. 11, 1827, Sally Benedict;

d. .

4. viii. Martha ("Patty"), b. Sept. 29, 1791; m. Reuben Andrew;
d. Jan. 14, 'l883.

ix. Ruth, b. ; m. Jan. 19, 1814, Jordan Gray; d. .

x. Polly, b. ; m. Bates; d. .

xi. Sally, b. ; m. Taylor; d. .

xii. Abigail, b. ; m. 1854, Norman Martin; d. — .



262 Prindle Genealogy.

4. MARTHA OATMAN.
Martha (" Patty ") Oatman was born in Arlington, Vt., Sept.
29, 1791; married March 15, 1810, Reuben Andrew, son of Syl-
vestor (a soldier of the Revolutionary war) and Mary (Weaver)
Andrew, who was born in Coventry, R. I., March 9, 1782, and died
in Arlington, Vt., Sept. 13, 1865.

She died in Arlington, Jan. 14, 1883, and both were buried in
St. James church-yard there.

Children, born in Arlington, Vt.:
5. i. Olive Andrew, b. Jan. 12, 1811; m. Hawley Prindle; d.
March 15, 1864.
ii. Dorman Andrew, b. Sept. 11, 1812; m. Eliza Vaughan; d.

Nov. 17, 1894.
iii. Daniel Andrew, b. Oct. 27, 1814; d. Aug. 19, 1868, unm.
iv. Isaac O. Andrew, b. April 23, 1817; m. Maria Rounds; d.

Dec. 20, 1872.
V. Antha Andrew, b. Nov. 11, 1820; m. Nathan Hard; d. Feb.

10, 1894.
vi. Alvah Andrew, b. Aug. 2, 1823; m. Pamelia Oatman; d.

Sept. 14, 1854.
vii. Nathan Andrew, b. Feb. 22, 1828; m. Martha Montgomery;

d. May 20, 1902.
viii. Myron Andrew (twin), b. Dec. 25, 1830; m. Charlotte J.
Hard; d. Nov. 24, 1868.
ix. Byron Andrew (twin), b. Dec. 25, 1830; d. Dec. 9, 1897,
unm.

5. OLIVE ANDREW.

Olive Andrew, daughter of Reuben and Martha (Oatman)
Andrew, was born in Arlington, Vt., Jan. 12, 1811; married Oct.
22, 1838, Hawley^ Prindle (Zenas'^, Zalmon^, Joel^, Joseph^,
Ebenezer-, William^), son of Zenas and Hannah (Cogswell)
Prindle, of Sandgate, Vt., who was born in Sandgate, Feb. 29,
1812, and died in Chillicothe, Mo., Aug. 27, 1883.

She died in Arlington, March 15, 1864, and both were buried
in St. James church-yard there.



NOTE 8.

Andrew Ancestry of the Descendants of Hawley Prindle.

1. JOHN ANDREW.

John Andrew, b. ; m. (2) Mary Ridgly; d. bef. 1693.

She d. after 1716.

He was of Kings Town, Rhode Island, May 20, 1671, at which
time he took the oath of allegiance. January 1, 1672, he with
others bought of Awashuatt, chief sachem of land called Quo-
hassett, in Narragansett, for a valuable sum, etc., a certain tract
in Quohasset, bounded on the east from the house of John Andrew,
etc. The sachem's two brothers and three sons also conveyed their
interest in same.

Nov. 10, 1679, John Mackandrew, alias Andrews, petitioned the
Assembly to remit the sentence of the General Court of Trials, on
account of the great infirmity of his body and smallness of his
estate. Corporal punishment was remitted, also 5 pounds of fine.

He held the office of constable in 1683-84; and on Sept. 6, 1687,
the records show that he was taxed 4 shillings and 8 pence.

Children:

i. John, Jr., b. East Greenwich, R. I., ; m. Rebecca

; d. .

ii. William, b. East Greenwich, Aug. 23, 1679; m. Anna Searle;
d. 1762.

2. iii. Charles, b. East Greenwich, ; m. Judith Matteson;

d. Jan. 13, 1762.

iv. James, b. Providence, R. I., ; m. Martha Jenckes;

d. July 10, 1716.

V. Thomjas, b. ; d. .

vi. Edward, b. ; d. .

vii. Benoni, b. East Greenwich, ; m. Rebecca ; d.



2. CHARLES ANDREW.

Charles Andrew, b. East Greenwich, R. I., ; m. Judith

Matteson, dau. of Henry and Judith ( ) Matteson, who was

b. Oct. 16, 1694.

He v/as freeman in 1704. His will, dated June 25, 1758, and
proved Jan. 30, 1762, with son Edmond named as executor, be-
queathed: To son Charles, 275 acres, north end of my farm in
Coventry, an iron bar, and 50 pounds. To son Jonathan, land in
East Greenwich, two blankets, coverlid, and 50 pounds. To daughter
Hannah Andrew, 158 pounds, and bed. To daughter Alice Hop-
kins, 150 pounds, and bed. To Thomas Rouse, son of Rebecca
Rouse, deceased, 100 acres in Coventry, bed, bible, chest, and

263



264 Prindle Genealogy.

pewter, at age. To Waite Sweet, daughter of Hannah Matteson,
eight ewe sheep, eight lambs, and a heifer, fair with calf, when
said Waite is eighteen. To three sons and two daughters, rest of
indoor movables. To son Edmond, all my homestead farm, and
all outdoor movables. Inventory: 625 pounds, 10 shillings, viz:
Wearing apparel, 75 pounds, 10 shillings, beds, pewter, eight sheep,
2 cows, 3 old chairs, old wooden wheels, etc.
Children:
i. Hannah, b. July 25, 1718; m. Jan. 3, 1741, John Andrew,

son of Benoni Andrew,
ii. Thomas, b. Dec. 5, 1720.
iii. James, b. Nov. 2, 1724.

3. iv. Charles, Jr., b. Jan. l6, 1726; m. Mary . He was

a soldier of the Revolution.
V. Jonathan, b. July 11, 1729.
vi. Edmond, b. June 7, 1731.
vii. Alice, b. Oct. 9, 1733; m. Sept. 17, 1752, Timothy Hopkins.

3. CHARLES ANDREW^ JR.
Charles Andrew, Jr., was born Jan. 16, 1726; m. Mary



He was a soldier of the Revolutionary war. The
Military Papers of the Rhode Island Historical Society show that
he was borne as a private in the first division Alarm list, Samuel
Wall, captain, July 1, 1778.

Children, born in Coventry, R. I. :
i. Elizabeth, b. March 30, 1755.
2. ii. Sylvester, b. Dec. 12, 1760; m. (1) Mary Weaver; (2)
Hannah ; d. Nov. 25, 1838. He was a Revolu-
tionary soldier and pensioner,
iii. Holden, b. July 15, 1762.
iv. Lowry, b. April 14, 1764.
v. John, b. July IS, 1766.
vi. Jonathan, b. Dec. l6, 1768.

4. SYLVESTER ANDREW.

Sylvester Andrew was born in Coventry, Kent Co., R. I., Dec.
12, 1760; married (1) in 1781, Mary Weaver, who was born March
24, 1761, and died after the birth of daughter Judith; married (2)

Hannah ; removed to Arlington, Vt., where he died Nov. 25,

1838, and was buried in the grave-yard on Maple Hill, the in-
scription reading " Capt. Sylvester Andrew, aged 78."

The records of the Pension Bureau show that he was a soldier
of the Revolutionary war, having served in the Rhode Island
troops at various times from 1777 to 1781 under Captains Wm.
Roy, Asa Bennett, and Topping.

In his application for a pension, dated Arlington, Vt., Aug.



Appendix. 265

14>, 1832, he states that he "was born in Coventry, R. I., Dec. 12,
1760, and removed to Arlington, Vt., two years after the war.
Never had a written discharge. Served one month and eight days
in 1778, when he went to Newport, where there was a severe en-
gagement with the enem}^, under Gen. Sullivan, who had command
of the American forces." His claim was allowed. In his applica-
tion he makes reference also to the military service of his father.

The following further reference to his military service has been
furnished by the Office of the State Record Commissioner:

"Andrews, Sylvester. Private, Rhode Island militia; R. I. pen-
sioner, residing in Bennington County, Vermont; annual allowance
$42.21; sum received, $123.63; placed on Pension Roll Aug. 31,
1833; pension commenced March 4, 1831; age 73." — Pension Roll,
23d Congress, Vol. I., p. 73. Also " In the Census of Men Able
to Bear Arms, 1777, his name appears under the town of Coventry;
age 16-50, able."

Children :

5. i. Reuben (twin), b. Coventry, R. I., March 9, 1782; m.
Martha Oatman; d. Sept. 13, 1865.
ii. Barbara (twin), b. Coventry, R. I., March 9, 1782; m. (1)
Benjamin Bowen; m. (2) John Allen.

iii. Polly, b. ; m. John Johnson; d. .

iv. Judith, b. June 13, 1785; m. May, 1803, Preserved Hall,
who d. Hartford, Conn., March 11, 1869; d. Dec. 22,
1866.
V. Sylvester, Jr., b. Arlington, Vt., ; m. ; d.



vi. Benoni, b. Arlington, Vt., Oct. 26, 1790; m. Catharine (his
cousin), dau. of Lowry Andrew, who was b. in Broadal-
bin, N. Y., Dec. 3, 1790, and d. Shaftsbury, Vt., July
27, 1869; d. Shaftsbury, Jan. 28, 1871.

vii. Hannah, b. ; m. as his second wife, Vaughan;

d. .

5. REUBEN ANDREW.

Reuben Andrew was born in Coventry, R. I., March 9, 1782;
married March 15, 1810, Martha Oatman, dau. of Isaac and Anna

( ) Oatman, who was born Sept. 29, 1791, and died Jan.

14, 1883; died Sept. 13, 1865, and buried Arlington, Vt.

Children, born in Arlington, Vt.:
6. i. Olive, b. Jan. 13, 1811; m. Hawley Prindle; d. March
15, 1864.
ii. Dorman, b. Sept. 11, 1812; m. Sept. 23, 1865, Eliza

Vaughn; d. Nov. 17, 1894.
iii. Daniel, b. Oct. 27, 1814; d. Aug. 19, 1868, unm.



266 Prindle Genealogy.

iv. Isaac O., b. April 23, 1817; m. Nov, 1, 1842, Maria
Rounds; d. Dec. 20, 1872.

V. Antha, b. Nov. 11, 1820; m. Sept. 10, 1851, Nathan Hard;
d. Feb. 10, 1894.

vi. Alvah, b. Aug. 2, 1823; m. Nov. 1, 1850, Pamelia Oatman;
d. Sept. 14, 1854.

vii. Nathan, b. Feb. 22, 1828; m. Nov. 16, 1852, Martha

Montgomery; d. May 20, 1902.
viii. Myron (twin), b. Dec. 25, 1830; m. Feb. 21, 1856, Char-
lotte J. Hard; d. Nov. 24, 1868.

ix. Byron (twin), b. Dec. 25, 1830; d. Dec. 9, 1897, unm.

6. OLIVE ANDREW.

Olive*' Andrew (Reuben^, Sylvester^, Charles, Jr.^, Charles'^,
Johv}), daughter of Reuben and Martha (Oatman) Andrew, was
born in Arlington, Vt., Jan. 12, 1811; m. Oct. 28, 1838, Hawley^
Prindle {Zenas^, Zalmon^, Joel^, Joseph^, Ehenezer~, William}),
son of Zenas and Hannah (Cogswell) Prindle, who was born in
Sandgate, Vt., Feb. 29, 1812, and died in Chillicothe, Mo., Aug.
27, 1883.

She died in Arlington, Vt., March 15, 1864, and both were
buried there in St. James' church-yard.



The early genealogy of this branch of the Andrew Family may
be found in Austin's Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island,
and from the Vital Records of Rhode Island, 1636-1850.



NOTE 9.

Sarah Ann Prindle, daughter of Zenas and Hannah (Cogs-
well) Prindle, was born in Sandgate, Vt., April 3, ISS-i; married
January 1, 1845, Zachariah Hurd Randall, son of Levi and
Annie (Hurd) Randall, of Sandgate, who was born there August
11, 1825. He was in early life called " Ryer " so much that he
afterward assumed that name.

Late in the fall following their marriage they left Vermont
and started out to find a new home in the " Far West," jjroceeding
by wagon to Troy, N. Y., thence by the Erie Canal to Buffalo,
where he shipped for a lake trip to Milwaukee, in the then Ter-
ritory of Wisconsin. They first made their home with her uncle,
Martin Cogswell, in the township of Brookfield, near Milwau-
kee, with whom they lived until 1849, when they concluded to
remove to Appleton, Wis. They pushed out by team as far as
Fond du Lac, thence going by rowboat to Menasha, and finally
by an Indian canoe to within three miles of Appleton, walking the
remaining distance.

Appleton then (February, 1849) consisted of a small number
of log buildings only, not a frame structure having then been built.

Mr. Randall purchased l60 acres of Government land in Grand
Chute township adjoining, a tract of unbroken forest, and the first
white man's habitation was the log cabin built by him. Here they
lived during all the succeeding years; for the first few he was
obliged to seek work for a part of the time in Appleton, but each
year found the farm in better condition, until at length it yielded
a comfortable income.

A new and larger frame house succeeded the old log cabin,
more and more of the forest land was cleared and brought under
cultivation, and after many years of hard and patient toil the farm
was finally brought from its wild and unproductive state to a con-
dition of comfort and profit. Here their only child, Viola, now Mrs.
J. N. Fox, was born ; here they celebrated their golden wedding,
January 1st, 1895, and here Mrs. Randall died. May 27, 1904,
aged 80 years. It was the compiler's privilege to have seen this
dear aunt married, at her father's home, adjoining his own, in
Sandgate, Vt., January 1, 1845, and — though but once again — •
to look upon her fair, sweet face, bearing scarcely a wrinkle, as
she lay in her casket prepared for burial, on that beautiful Sun-
day morning in May, more than fifty-nine years after.

Mr. Randall is now left as the only survivor of those who were
residents of the township at the time of his arrival there in 1849-
He has held leading offices in the township, serving several years
as chairman, etc., and in the discharge of all his public duties
has met with the approval of his fellow citizens.

267



268 Prindle Genealogy,

On July 16^ 1861, soon after the breaking out of the Re-
bellion, Mr. Randall enlisted as a musician in the regimental band
of the 6th Wisconsin Vols., and served, principally at Washington
and Arlington Heights, Va., until October 1st following, when he
was honorably discharged on account of disability resulting from
exposure while marching. In September, 1864, he again entered
the army, having been drafted, and was assigned to Co. F., 22nd
Regt., Wis. Vols., with which he served until the close of the Avar,
and then returned to the old home of his early manhood, middle
life, and now old age, where he still resides.



NOTE 10.

Franklin Cogswell Prindle, son of Hawley and Olive
(Andrew) Prindle, and great-grandson of Zalmon Prindle, was
born in Sandgate, Vermont, July 8, 18-11, where he lived until
1850, when the family removed to Arlington, Vermont. His
father Avas a farmer.

He was educated in the public schools, and at the Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York. He early evinced a love
for reading and study, and his rapid progress in mathematics be-
yond those of his age was made the subject of official comment in
reports of the town superintendent of the public schools. He sub-
sequently taught in the same school where he had attended, some
of his former schoolmates being among his pupils.

Possessing a marked aptitude for mechanics and machinery, and
having a strong dislike for farm work and life, he sought his
parents' consent to learn a trade, and for some months worked as
an apprentice in the machine shop and foundry of Grover and
Harrington, in Bennington, Vt. But being of slight build and not
very robust it was soon found that he had not the requisite strength
to continue, and so was reluctantly compelled to abandon that
congenial work and return to the farm.

He had early learned the use of tools while yet a boy, and now
supplemented by this experience in the machine shop, he fitted up
an outbuilding as a workshop of his own and equipped it with a
carpenter's bench, blacksmith's forge, and turning lathe worked by
foot, which he had recovered from a factory fire and rebuilt for
working in both Mood and metals. Here he spent most of his
spare moments, often working after the day's toil late into the
niglit by the aid of a lantern, until peremptorily called into the
house and sent to bed. In this shop he constructed several labor-
saving contrivances and machines to lessen the drudgery of farm-
ing, which work was to him most distasteful, and also made several
other inventions, only to often find them anticipated by others. He
constructed, in wood, a Avorking model of a duplex steam engine,
by Avhich the slide valve on one cylinder was actuated by the piston-
rod of the other, in substantially the same way as obtains in the
well-known duplex steam pumps of to-day, which have a world-
wide use. Here he also built a small oscillating steam engine and
attached it to the boiler of a shingle mill in an adjoining town
in order to prove to some doubters that it would " go," as it did.

This brought him into more prominent notice in the vicinity,
and resulted in an offer and acceptance of employment in a steam
saw and stave mill, then just starting in a neighboring town at
the foot of the Green ^fountains, Avhere he assisted in erecting the
engine and boilers and other machinery, and then remained for a

269






270 Prindle Genealogy.

time as engineer and fireman, finally leaving the factory after a
year and more, where he had reached the position of superintendent,
at the age of 18, to take a course of study in civil engineering.

He was admitted to the sophomore class of the Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N. Y., in I860, and at the end of his
sophomore year, in 1861, he left the Institute to enter the Navy.
The Civil War was then in progress and, responding to his pa-
triotic impulses, he offered his services to his country. Preferring
the Engineering Corps of the Navy he readily qualified for re-
ceiving an appointment therein, the age requirement in his case —
he being but twenty years old — having been waived by Secretary
Welles to enable him to enter the competitive examination pre-
cedent to such an appointment, which resulted in his successfully
passing with the standing of No. 3 in his class and receiving the
appointment of Third Assistant Engineer in the Navy, August 3,

1861.

He was immediately ordered to duty on the U. S. S. Ottawa, one
of the " ninety-day gunboats " then fitting out at the Novelty Iron
Works in New York, which sailed in October to join Commodore
Dupont's squadron then assembling at Hampton Roads, Va. The
" Ottawa " was one of the 48 vessels comprising the famous Port
Royal Expedition, which sailed from Hampton Roads, October 19,
1861, and which was dispersed by a furious storm in passing Cape
Hatteras when some vessels were lost, and some days later re-
assembled off Port Royal, South Carolina. He was in his maiden
battle of Port Royal, November 7, 1861, which resulted, after a
furious bombardment of several hours, in the capture of the forts
commanding the harbor at Hilton Head and Bay Point. After this
he saw much active service in the South Atlantic Blockading
Squadron, and participated in the sinking of the " stone fleet " at
the entrance of Charleston Harbor, in the engagements at Poco-
taligo, Stono Inlet, Secessionville, Morris Island, and other de-
fences of Charleston, including the reduction of Fort Sumter, cap-
ture of Beaufort, Fort Clinch, Fernandina, St. Marys, Jackson-
ville, Palatka, and other minor operations in the South Atlantic
waters, the blockade of Charleston and Savannah and along the
coast from Georgetown, N. C, to Jupiter Inlet, Fla., etc., to which
squadron the Ottawa remained attached under Commodores Dupont
and Dahlgren.

He was promoted to Second Assistant Engineer, April 21, 1863,
and a year later granted a month's leave of absence, when he
returned home, and at the expiration of his leave he was ordered
to special duty at the Novelty Iron Works, New York, where he
remained until the close of the war.

The war being ended, and having no taste for a sea-faring life,
he offered his resignation, which was accepted September 11, 1865,



Appendix. 271

and soon after entered the office of Norman W. Wheeler, me-
chanical engineer. New York City.

Some two years afterward he was offered and accepted the ap-
pointment of assistant civil engineer at the New York Navy Yard,
and after a short period of duty there was transferred to the Navy


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Online LibraryFranklin Cogswell PrindleThe Prindle genealogy. embracing the descendants of William Pringle the first settler, in part for six, seven and eight generations, and also the ancestors and descendants of Zalmon Prindle for ten generations, covering a period of two hundred and fifty-two years, 1654-1906 → online text (page 20 of 26)