Franklin Ellis.

History of Fayette County, Pennsylvania : with biographical sketches of many of its pioneers and prominent men online

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new grist-mill, the one now carried on by his son
Henry. From 1812 to 1881 the mill property has al-
ways been in the hands and possession of a Cook.
The old log fulling-mill that had been operated by
the Fallis brothers upon the present site of the Cook
Brothers' woolen-factory was leased by Thomas Cook
to William Searight, who made the business so suc-
cessful that he had in a few years saved five thousand
dollars from it. He fulled as high as two hundred
pieces of cloth in a year.

In 1829-30, Thomas Cook, Jr., built the present
woolen-factory, stocked it with valuable machinery,
and leased it to Ephraim Pilling, James Pilling, and
James Hamer, who were the first to manufacture
woolen cloths at Cook's Mills. Thomas Cook, Jr.,
took possession of the factory business after a while,
and carried it on until his death in 1873. His sons,
Thomas and Playford Cook, are the present proprie-
tors of the business, in which they manufacture blan-
kets, flannels, satinettes, cassimeres, jeans, and all
kinds of yarn. They use both steam- and water-
power, and employ usually a force of six hands.
John Smith is believed to have opened the first store
at Cook's Mills, but when he opened it or how much
of a store he had are now not to be ascertained.
Likewise Shadrach Negus did a small tanning busi-
ness on the creek at Cook's Mills, but recollection of
him as well as of Smith is vague and uncertain. The



REDSTONE TOWNSHIP.



733



first store of any consequence was first kept by
Thomas Cook, Jr.

The store now at Cook's Mills was established there
by John S. Marsh in April, 1881. He was a store-
keeper at the place twenty years or more before that
date, but in 1862 transferred his store just over the
creek into Jefferson township, in which year he was
appointed postmaster of Tippecanoe post-office. The j
Tippecanoe post-office was established about 1856, at
which time there was a sharp contest between the |
residents of the respective localities of Cook's Mills |
and the Sharpless paper-mill for a post-office. Mr. J
William Colvin, of Jeifersou, acted on behalf of the
paper-mill location, and not only suggested the name j
as not borne by any other office in the State, but was
mainly instrumental in securing the office location at
tlie mill. W. C. Johnson claims that he and Post-
master Sloan, of Brownsville, fixed upon the name of
Tippecanoe, in remembrance of the old-time election
songs of the Harrison campaign. John B. Patterson,
then keeping a store at the paper-mill, was appointed
the first postmaster, and was succeeded by William
W. Strebig. In 1862, John S. Marsh was appointed, i
moved the office to Cook's Mills, and since that date i
has been the postmaster. [

Cook's Mills' first resident physicians were Dr. I
Washington Barras and his brother William, who
practiced in partnership from 1862 until a short time
afterwards. Both are now dead, William being said
to have been blown up on a Southern steamboat. ^
The next physician was Dr. Houston Finley, who re- |
mained about three years. He resides now in Strea-
tor, 111. Dr. John Davidson, who came after him, |
stopped but two years. He is now in Perryopolis.
Andrew Guiler, the present village physician, located
here in 1879. A Dr. Baltz built a water-cure estab-
lishment in Redstone in 1846, and conducted it to
1850, when, discouraged with his poor success, he !
abandoned the enterprise.

William Thornton, one of Redstone's early settlers,
was killed in 1853 by one Peter Kelly. They met on
the National road, and in the heat of a controversy
that was but a renewal of an old feud Thornton was
killed. Kelly was sentenced to a term of twelve years'
imprisonment and served his full time.

TOWNSHIP ORGANIZATION AND CIVIL LIST.
In March, 1797, certain citizens of Menallen town-
ship petitioned for the division of the township,
whereupon the court ordered at the December tirm
in 1797 as follows: "On the petition of sundry in-
habitants of Menallen township praying a division (if
the same township, beginning at the corner of Ger-
man township ; thence with Dunlap's Creek to Eb-
enezer Linsley's saw-mill ; thence with the great road
to John Townsend's mill ; thence with the new road '
leading to Brownsville to a draught or run at Thomas
Fitz Randolph's ; thence with the said draught or [
run past Conrad Muller's to the forks of the same at



David Brewer's; thence in a direction to intersect
the Broad Ford road at the house of Andrew McKin-
ney, the property of John Tate; and thence with the
said road to Redstone Creek, it is considered by the
court that the said township be divided according to
the prayer of the petitioners, and that the lower or
we.stern division thereof be called ' Redstone' town-
ship, and that the upper or eastern part retain the old
name." In November, 1817, Brownsville township
was erected from a portion of Redstone.

The records of the elections in Redstone have not
been well kept, and it is therefore impossible to ob-
tain a complete civil list of the township from the
time of its erection. A list of the principal officers of
the township from 1840 to the present time is given
below, viz:

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE.



1840


William HiitBeld.


1859


James J. Hastings.




John Brown.


1860


James Craft.


1845


William K. Gallaher.


1864


W. P. Clifton.




William Hatfield.


1865


R. Hagerty.


1850


William C. .lohnston.




F. Chalfant.




John Cunningham.


1869


J. Armstrong.


1854


Griffith Roberts.




J. Craft.




Uriah Higinbotham.


1877


Jacob G.allaher.


1855


James Craft.


1880


George Krepps.


1859


William G. Patterson.


1881


T. H. Higinbotham.




ASSESSORS.




1840


Daniel C. Phillips.


1861


Samuel W. Rammage.


1841


Washington Brashear.


1862


Reason A. Moore.


1842


Griffith Roberts.


1863


J. W. Linn.


1843


William Hastings.


1864


J. Radcliff.


1844


Jacob Shackleton.


1865


A. Real.


1845


Samuel Arison.


1.866


W. Waggoner.


1846


AVilliam Colvin.


1867


J. W. Linn.


1847


John C. McCormick.


1868.


AV. T. Gribble.


1S4S


William S. Hatfield.


1869.


0. Brasher.


1849


Solomon Colley.


1871.


R. Tate.


1850


George Wagoner.


1872.


R. A. Frost.


1851


James Colvin.


1873.


H. Y. Roteruck.


1852


James J. Hastings.


1874.


.S. P. Chalfant.


1853


Alfred Dearth.


1875.


R. S. Smith.


1854


George N. Crable.


1876.


R. P. Brashear.


1855


William Waggoner.


1877.


J. D. Simpson.


1856


Elliott Hibbs.


1878.


J. A. Beal.


1857


William C. Johnston.


1879.


J. A. Woodward.


1858


Nelson Randolph.


1880.


J. R. Van Kirk.


1859


James Cr.aft.


1881.


J. E. Frost.


1860.


John Irons.

AUD


TOKS.




1840.


Samuel P. Chalfant.


1853.


Lorenzo D. McCormick


1841.


George Colley.


1854.


Finley Chalfant.


is4i;.


Samuel P. Chalfant.


1855.


Benjamin Phillips.


im:;.


Eli Abrams.


1856.


John RadcliflT.


IS 14.


William K. Gallaher.


1857.


Andrew Linn.


1845.


James Watson.


1858.


George Craft.


1846.


James Craft.


1859.


Oliver P. Randolph.


1847.


Earliart (Arabic.


1860.


Thornton Randolph.


1848.


Daniel C. Phillips.


1861.


Elijah Van Kirk.


1849.


Ale-tander Baird.


1862.


Abraham Garwood.


1850.


Abraham Garwood.


1863.


Samuel Baird.


1851.


William B. Craft.


1864.


W. Colvin.


1852.


William K. Gallaher.


1865.


E. Grable.



HISTORY OF FAYETTE COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.



1866. \V. Colvin, Sv.

1S67. E. Craft.

1868. G. Roberts.

1869. W. Sharpless.

1870. A. Rush.

1871. S. Colvin.

1872. C. N. Hatford.

1873. James Craft.
1S74. Finlcy Chalfant.



1875. John Armstrong.
George N. Gallahe

1876. James Craft.

1877. Alpheus Craft.

1878. Anderson Craft.

1879. J. F. Grable.

1880. L. D. Craft.
John Gallagher.

18S1. J. Palmer.



Brief mention only may be made of Redstone's
early schools before the organization of districts in
18.35, and less even about the schools at the last-
mentioned date, since the school records beginning
then have disappeared. In 1807 a log school-house
stood in the Centre school district near the Quaker
Church, and in itthe teacher that year was old Saminy
Lappan. In 1810, John Simpson taught school in a
log house that still stands in the Eedstone District
and is the residence of Aaron Hess. In 1812, John
Hankinson taught in a house near the Green Tree
tavern, and in 1813 there was a school-house in the
Bunker Hill District near Gallaher's, but who was
the first teacher is not known. In the Colvin neigh-
borhood a school was taught by a Mr. Walbridge in
1803. Of course schools were taught in Redstone
some time before the earliest of the dates above given,
but the oldest inhabitants do not recollect any earlier
particulars than those mentioned.

In 1828 a hewn-log school-house was built upon
land donated by Robert Baird near the Luzerne line,
in Oak Hill District. It measured twenty-four by
eighteen feet, having windows on three sides. Each
window was nine feet long and two feet and a half
high. JIany years afterwards the fourth side was
pierced for a window. Desks were fastened along
the wall below the windows, and upon slab benches
the children sat and pursued their studies. Those
concerned in the building of the house were Hon.
Charles Porter, Robert Baird, Sr., Johnson Van Kirk,
Aaron Baird, Maxwell Dearth, Alexander Baird,
James E. Breading, and others. The carpenter was
Joseph Mahatt'ey. School was opened the second week
of May, 1828. Sarah Henderson, the first teacher,
taught there four years. Then she removed to Ohio,
wherr sIk' di.-d in 1S.34.

Thr rolls c)t tliL' pupils of this school for the years
1828 ;uiil 1S2!! hud upon them the names of Aaron
Langley, Alexander J. Baird, Jr., Allen Bird, Caleb
Hibbs, Daniel McKnight, Enoch F. Baird, George (t.
Baird, Harrison Johnston, Hugh Laughlin, Jacob
J. Porter, John Porter, James P. Baird, John Dearth,
Johnston V. Dearth, Jonah Dearth, Jacob Meredith,
John Coulter, C. W. B. Henderson, Josepli H. Coul-
ter, John Smith, Levi Bunting, R. J. Baird, R. McC.
Porter, Robert A. Baird, Samuel Allamon, Samuel
M. Baird, Samuel N. Haird, Theodore Van Kirk,
Thomas \V. Porter, William F. Baird, William J.



Baird, William Riley, William Hanna, Eliza Jane
Van Kirk, Elizabeth J. Porter, Ellen and Mary
Ewing, Hannah and Phcebe Porter, Lsabella and
Rebecca Laughlin, Martha J. Johnston, Martha Mc-
Knight, Mary JIcKnight, Susan Hadley, Amanda
Offord, Anna Dearth, Erie, Eliza, Harriet, and Jane
Baird, Harriet and Hannah Riley, Virlinda J. Riley,
Harriet and Mary Ann Meredith, Jane Dunlap, Mar-
garet Moulton, Mary J. Coulton, Miranda Van Kirk,
Sarah J. Hibbs. The books used were the United
States Speller, New Testament, English Reader, Mur-
ray's English Grammar, Smiley's Arithmetic and
Western Calculator, Goodrich's Geography.

Following is a list of school directors elected in
Redstone during the last forty years :



1840


George Craft.


1862


John McCormick.




Robert Finley.




Parker McDonald.


1841


Samuel Linn.


1863


A. F. Dearth.




Jacob Shackleton.




W. B. Downs.




William K. Gallaher.


1864


A. F. Dearth.


1842


John Roderick.




A. Garwood.




John Craft.


1865


S. Ramage.


1843


William HatBeld.




D. Hibbs.




Washington Brashear.




S. McCormick.


1844


William Hastings.


1866


T. Simpson.




William B. Randolph.




J. Linn.


1845


Griffith Roberts.


1867


J. Cook.




John McCormick.




S. B. Page.


1846


William Hatfield.




S. Cammarine.




Samuel Linn.




S. M. Baird.




William B. Craft.


1868


J. Thornton.


1847


John Hibbs.




A. Beal.




Huston Todd.




F. Chalfant.


1848


William K. Gallaher.


1869


J. Higinbotham.




Washington Shriver.




J. Armstrong.


1849


Henry Cook.


1870


W. Norcross.




Eli Cope.




Alexander Van Kirk


1850


Samuel Lion.


1871


S. M. Baird.




Alexander Baird.




J. Palmer.


1851


Joel Vernon.


1872


J. C. Thornton.




Amos Woodward.




W.G. Higinbotham.


1852


William Hastings.




A. Dearth.




John Roderick.


1873


John Reisbaok.


1853


W. S. J. Hatfield.




Leonard Thompson.




Daniel C. Phillips.




Aaron Beal.


1854


David Hibbs.


1874


Paul Hough.




Washington Shriver.




Elliott Hibbs.


1855


Isaac Linn.


1875


James Jackson.




James Dunn.




W. G. Higinbotham.




H. J. Ritcnhour.


1876


John Moore.


1856


Eli Cope.




W. g. Clemmer.




Wilson Hill.


1877




1857


Samuel Linn.




Isaac Lyons.




Robert Finley.




Solomon Cummins.


1858


William Corbin.


1878


W. S. Hatfield.




AVilliam Hopkins.




W. I. Grable.




Uriah Higinbotham.


1879


John Simpson.


1859


John Kadcliff.




John Moore.




William Hastings.


1880


J. B. Stephens.


1860


John Kelly.




T. C. Linn.




William Hopkins.


1881


T. W. Finley.


1861


Robert Finley.




W. Kefover,




Nelson Randolph.




Th..,niis Coffman.



KEDSTONE TOWNSHIP.



735



DUNLAP'S CREEK PKESBYTERIAN CHIRCH.

Presbyterian preaching, and perhaps preaching of
any Ifind, was first heard in Dunlap's Creek Valley
in 1765, in which year Rev. James Finley, living on
the Eastern Shore of Maryland, made an expedition
through that region. He preached wherever oppor-
tunity offered, in tents, groves, school-houses, and
barns. He made similar tours in 1767, 1771, and
1772. In the summer of 1774, Philip Tanner, a com-
panion with Rev. Mr. Finley in 1765, and a settler in
Redstone soon afterwards, agitated the subject of the
organization of a church in his neighborhood, and
invited Rev. James Power, his son-in-law, to come
out from Chester County for the purpose. Mr. Power
responded promptly, and in September, 1774, he or-
ganized the Dunlap's Creek Church at a meeting
held in a sugar-grove on Mr. Tanner's farm. There
were sixty-one constituent members, of whom the
ruling elders chosen were Charles McClean, Andrew
Frazer, Robert Baird, John Parker, Samuel Torrance,
Daniel Reeder, Ebenezer Finley, and William Frame.
The large number of constituent members would
seem to indicate that nearly all, if not quite all, the '
church-going people in that region were Presbyterians.
The region tributary to the church organization soon
embraced not only Dunlap's Creek Valley, but Union-
town, Brownsville, and the country known as the Red-
stone settlement. Mr. Power preached two years,
and then being requested to settle permanently among
the people as pastor returned to Chester County for
his family, and with them came over the mountains
in the fall of 1776 by way of Braddock's road. He
rode upon one horse, his wife and one child upon an-
other, and his two other children upon a third in
baskets slung across the animal's back. Shortly after
Mr. Power organized the church a log meeting-house
was built upon Mr. Tanner's farm, and in that house
— and occasionally in teuts in the woods — the Dun-
lap's Creek congregation worshiped until 1814, when
a new edifice was erected. Mr. Power was comfort-
ably settled with his family, and was promised a yearly
salary of £120 ($320). He remained, however, but
three years, when he accepted a call to be the pastor
at Mount Pleasant, where he afterwards preached for
thirty years. Rev. James Dunlap was secured to
succeed Mr. Power at Dunlap's Creek. Mr. Dunlap
was the first installed pastor, for it was not until 1781
that the Redstone Presbytery was organized. The
Presbytery intended to take action that year upon
the call to Mr. Dunlap to be pastor at Dunlap's Creek
and Laurel Hill, but the members did not assemble
because of prevailing Indian troubles, and so it was
not until Oct. 15, 1782, that he was installed, although
he had been officiating as pastor from 1780. The Pres-
bytery consisted that year of the Revs. James Powers,
of Sewickley and Mount Pleasant ; Thaddeus Dodd,
of Ten-Mile; John McMillan, of Pigeon Creek and



Chartiers (who preached at Dunlap's in 1774 and 1775
in conjunction with Rev. Mr. Power) ; and Joseph
Smith, of Buffalo and Cross Creek.

Mr. Dunlap continued to be the pastor until 1789.
In 1787 the church had a session of eight elders and
eighty-three members. The elders were Charles Mc-
Clean, Robert Baird, Ebenezer Finley, Samuel Tor-
rance, Andrew Frazer, John Parker, William Frame,
and Daniel Reeder. The members included the fore-
going-named elders and their wives, together with
William Lynn, John and Jane Moore, Margaret
Smith, William and Anne Norris, John Jones, Linn
Oliphant, Linn Gilillen, John and Sarah Miller,
Widow McKinn, James and Margaret Adams,
Thomas and Ann Gallaher, Samuel and Agnes
McKinley, Samuel Adams and wife, Jacob and
Eleanor Reeder, George Hill, William and Mary
Grey, Stephen Reeder, Susanna Adams, James Brown,
David and Mary Reeder, Eliza and Jemima Reeder,
Mary Hubbell, William Rose and wife, Elizabeth
Adams, James and Susanna Frame, Richard and
Elsie AVatts, James Adams, Jr., Benjamin Adams,
George Smith, Sarah Wilson, Samuel and Elizabeth
Sprout, Mary Alton, Mary Wilson, John Baird, Wil-
liam Powell and wife, Eleanor McClain, Absalom
Little and wife, William Conwell and wife, Lewis
Davidson and wife, Joseph Moss, Reuben Winget,
James and Agnes McLaughlin, James and Rebecca
Veech, Samuel Adams, Jr., and wife, Martha Work,
and George Lee.

Between the date of the departure of Mr. Dunlap
and 1792 the church depended upon supplies. In the
year last named Rev. Jacob Jennings was installed as
pastor, and remained in the pastorate until 1811, when
he resigned because of age and infirmities. He con-
tinued his residence at Dunlap's Creek, and occupied
the pulpit occasionally until his death in February,
1813. Mr. Jennings was a physician as well as min-
ister, and during his entire pastorate pursued the
practice of his medical profession.

In September, 1812, it was determined to secure the
services as pastor of Rev. William Johnston. The
pledge for support was signed by ninety persons, and
read as follows : " We whose names are hereunto sub-
scribed, desirous of having the means of grace statedly
administered at Dunlap's Creek meeting-house, and
having a prospect of obtaining, in connection with
Brownsville, the ministerial labors of Mr. William
Johnston, at present a licentiate of the Ohio Presby-
tery, do engage to pay for his support, and as an ac-
knowledgment for one-half of his labors in the Dun-
lap's Creek congregation, the sums set opposite our
names per annum in half-yearly payments." The
paper was dated Sept. — , 1812, and signed by Eben-
ezer Finley, George Gallaher, John McClean, Robert
Baird, John Moss, Enoch French, James McCormick,
James Adams, John Wallace, Jacob Walter, F. Lewis,
Aaron Baird, Eucal Dod, John McCormick, Alexander
Baird, John Cunningham, Jr.*William Ewing, Com-



736



HISTORY OF FAYETTE COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA.



fort Arnold, Thomas Davidson, Jeremiah Davidson,
Jolm Cunningham, Armstrong Porter, David Porter,
AVilliam Porter, Joshua Corey, Nathaniel Breading,
William Hazel, Alexaiuk-r Wilson, Samuel Hancy,
Jesse Brown, Joseph Sprutt, Saimu-l TuLi^art, Vinlrt
Hays,GeorgeChalftuit, John M.inre,. Maxwell ll.anh,
Henry Conkling, John Saladay, Joseph Willey, Easter
Landers, Jacob Moss, Robert Boyd, James Finley,
John McDougal, Charles Porter, William Linn,
Ephraim Dilly, Joseph Green, Benjamin Eoss,
Thomas Gallaher, John Coulter, James Cunning- \
ham, AVilliani Cunningham, Joseph Dilly, L. B. Dod,
John Fulton, Noah Lewis, Elijah Coleman, Johnston
Van Kirk, Samuel Stanberry, John Luckey, Aaron
Torrence, Elizabeth Ross, Nancy Crawford, Elizabeth
Mills, James Corbitt, David Jackson, James Laug-
head and sons, Peter Hammon, William Ramsey,
John Torrence, Jesse Ross, James Kelly, Andrew
Clark, Hugh Laughlin, James Gilmore, Prettyman
Conwell, James Gibson, Margaret Porter, Barbara
Porter, A. Littell, William Mustard, Polly Englehart, ■
John Gallaher, Benjamin Barton, Thomas Scott. Of
the foregoing not one is now living. The last who
died was Armstrong Porter, who lived until 1879, and
reached his ninety-sixth year.

In March, 1813, Rev. Mr. Johnston entered the pas-
torate, and continued therein until December, 1839.
Soon after the commencement of his pastorate (in
1814) the handsome stone church now in use was
built. Mr. Johnston's .successor was the Rev. Sam-
uel Wilson, who was called Jan. 1, 1840, and installed
November 17th of that year. His pastorate lasted
until May 1, 1869, after which he moved to Illinois.
AVhen he began his labors at Dunlap's Creek the
church membership was eighty-two; when he closed
them it was one hundred and eighty-three. Rev. J.
P. Fulto.n, his successor, was the pastor from 1870 to
1879, when the present pastor. Rev. W. G. Nevin,
began his labors.

In 1S')3, to accommodate the large number of mem-
bers living in the neighborhood of New Salem, the
society built at New Salem a substantial brick chapel,
w'here services are regularly held by the pastor of
Dunlap's Creek. There is also at New Salem a
flourishing Sunday-school in connection with the
church. Of that school Ebenezer Finley has been
the superintendent twenty-eight years. He is, more- ■
over, the oldest member of Dunlap's Creek Church,
his period of connection therewith embracing fifty-
three years. For forty-seven years he has been a
ruling eider. Dunlap's Creek Church enjoys much
prosperity. The membership in March, 1881, was
about two hundred and seventy-five. The church j
property consists of two houses of worship, a parson- •
age, and twenty-six shares of bank stock, bequeathed
by Mary Ann Gilmore, widow of Hugh Campbell,
of Merrittstown. The elders are Finley Chalfant,
Johnson Van Kirk, E. T. Gallaher, Hayden Baird,
Ebenezer Finley. The trustees are Theodore Van !



Kirk, W. S. Craft, Joseph Woodward, and Albert
McMullen. Johnson Van Kirk is superintendent of
the Dunlap's Creek Sunday-school.

During the pastorate of Rev. Samuel Wilson the
Dunlap's Creek Presbyterial Academy was founded
in 1849, partly by the churches of the Presbytery, but
chiefly by members of Dunlap's Creek Church. Rev.
Samuel Wilson was the first principal, and John S.
Craig the first tutor. The principals succeeding Rev.
Mr. Wilson were James Black, Joseph Power, Simon
B. Mercer, Caleb B. Downs, George W. Chalfant, S.
J. Craighead, T. D. Ewing, D. H. Sloan, R. B. Porter,
W. J. Burchinal, and William Fulton. The academy
was a very popular school in its day, and frequently
had upwards of one hundred students on the rolls. In
1875 it ceased to exist, because the support extended
to it had become inadequate for its continuance.

The Dunlap's Creek graveyard, in the centre of
which stood the old Dunlap's Creek log church, con-
tains within its weather-beaten and time-worn old
stone-wall inclosure many reminders of the past and
of those who were foremost among the pioneers.
There are to be found in it many handsome monu-
ments, as well as neglected graves and broken tablets,
which tell how apt the living are to forget the dead.
Many old tombstone inscriptions are defaced and
illegible, others are still easily read. Among the
latter are those erected to the memories of Jane Moore,
who died Dec. 6, 1787 ; Jane Findley, June 5, 1793 ;
Lewis Davidson, Nov. 16, 1793 ; " Elizabeth, ye wief
of Lewis Davidson," April 24, 1794 ; John Mackey,
May 19, 1794 ; Samuel Torrance, 1797 ; Jacob Jen-
nings, 1796; Mary Hany, Jan. 10, 1802; Violet Find-
ley, 1804; Jane Torrance, 1808; John Porter, 1812;
Ann Porter, 1813 ; Margaret, consort of David Craft,
1812; William Wallace, 1804; Thomas Gallaher,
1806; Mary Cunningham, Oct. 23, 1822; John Ful-
ton, 1825 ; John Gallaher, 1820 ; and David Bread-
ing, who died (aged 85) in 1844. Upon the tombstone
of Elizabeth Baird, who died in 1826, is written,
" N.B. The deceased was consort of Robert Baird."

Two of the pastors of Dunlap's Creek Church were
laid to rest in the old churchyard. They were the
Revs. Jacob Jennings and William Johnston. The
tablet over Mr. Jennings' grave has the following:

•' In memory of the Kov. Dr. .Jacob Jennings, who for twenty

h)wer as well as ^i r,iitl,lnl imnincr of the Lord Jesus Christ
was testified by Iji- Ivn,'-. iiitiftued works and labor of love in
two arduous professions combined.* He died in the faith of the
gospel of Christ, and in the hope of that life and immortality



Online LibraryFranklin EllisHistory of Fayette County, Pennsylvania : with biographical sketches of many of its pioneers and prominent men → online text (page 168 of 193)