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with absolute and unmistakable confidence." Atlay,
"Victorian Chancellors," ii. 441.

JOHN HUMFPRETS PARRY (1816-1880) was the eldest son of
John Humffreys Parry, solicitor, better known to fame as a
learned Welsh antiquarian. Brought up to commerce, Parry
preferred a place in the printed book department of the British
Museum to a seat in a merchant's office. While there he
studied for the bar, to which he was called at the Middle
Temple in 1843. Like many celebrated advocates, he com-
menced his career in the criminal Courts, attending the Home
Circuit, the Central Criminal Court, and the Middlesex Sessions.
He soon acquired considerable civil business, was made Serjeant
at Law in 1856, and granted a patent of precedence in 1864.
He appeared in many celebrated cases. He defended Manning
for murder in 1849, was one of the counsel for the prosecution
in the trial at bar of the Tichborne claimant, and appeared
for the plaintiff in the action of Whistler v. Euskin in
1878. He stood twice for Parliament as an advanced Liberal,
unsuccessfully contesting Norwich, in 1847, and Finsbury, in
1857. He died in London on the 10th of January, 1880.

Montagu Williams, in his "Leaves of a Life," draws a very
pleasant picture of Parry " Remarkably solid in appearance,
his countenance was broad and expansive, beaming with honesty (
and frankness. His cross-examination was of a quieter kind
than that of Serjeant Ballantine. It was, however, almost as
effective. He drew the witness on in a smooth, good-humoured,
artful, and partly magnetic fashion. His attitude towards his
adversary also was peculiar; he never indulged in bickering,
was always perfectly polite, and was most to be feared when
he seemed to be making a concession. If in the course of a

o 193



Muller Trial.

trial he, without being asked, handed his adversary a paper
with the words, ' wouldn't you like to see this,' or some
kindred observation, let that adversary beware that there was
something deadly underneath." The author of a delightful
little book of legal reminiscences recently published (" Pie
Powder." By a Circuit Tramp) places Parry as an advocate
in certain respects pi*e-eminent among those he recollectsi;
"though," he says, "he may not have had the force of
Russell, the silver tongue of Coleridge, or the incisive skill of
Hawkins as a cross-examiner," he declares that in sheer power
of persuasion with a jury Parry has never had an equal within
his experience. No man was ever more popular with his pro-
fession. A good friend and a genial host, Parry must have
been a delightful companion. He married the daughter of
Edwin Abbott, a well-known writer on education, and for some
time headmaster of the Philological School at Marylebone,
where Parry had been educated. He left two sons, the second
of whom, Edward Abbott Parry, recently appointed County
Court judge at Lambeth, held for some time that office in Man-
chester, and is not only a most popular and worthy judge, but
a well-known author and dramatist.



194



UNIFORM WITH THIS VOLUME.

NOTABLE ENGLISH TRIALS.

Already published. Price 5s. net each.

THE TRIAL OF THE STAUNTONS (The Penge Mystery).
Edited by J. B. ATLAY, M.A., Barrister-at-law.
Dedicated to Sir Edward Clarke, K.C.

"The Penge case has been admirably edited by Mr. J. B. Atlay,
M.A., one of the most brilliant and best informed of our modern
criminologists." GEORGE R. SIMS in The Referee.

" Not only a welcome addition to an interesting body of literature,
but a valuable reinforcement of legal libraries." Manchester Guardian.

" It is a fascinating story which the editor has presented ; a tale of
real life with real characters." Morning Post.

" The editor has produced a most interesting and readable volume,
and is to be congratulated on an excellent piece of work." Scots Law
Times.

THE TRIAL OF FRANZ MULLER. Edited by H. B.
IRVING, M.A.(Oxon), Dedicated to Lord Halsbury.



The following trials are in preparation and will be
published in due course :

THE ANNESLEY CASE. Edited by ANDREW LANG.

WILLIAM PALMER. Edited by GEORGE H. KNOTT,
Barrister-at-law.

LORD LOVAT. Edited by DAVID N. MACKAY, Solicitor.
Dr. GEORGE H. LAMSON. Edited by H. L. ADAM.
Mrs. MAYBRICK. Edited by H. B. IRVING, M.A.(Oxon).



NOTABLE SCOTTISH TRIALS.

THE object of this series is to present a full and authentic record
of the more notable Trials that have a place in the annals of our
Scottish jurisprudence. Of many of these Trials the details are at
the present time not readily accessible, being either confined to the
pages of official reports or buried in the files of the daily press ; and
the volumes issued include such a narrative of our more important
causes c'elebres as shall prove not only of interest to the general
reader, but also of utility to those concerned, professionally or
otherwise, with the study and application of the legal principles
involved in the various cases to be dealt with.

To each Trial a separate volume has been assigned; and, where
available, the evidence has been reproduced in full, special care
being taken to ensure accuracy of detail.

The series is founded upon careful research into every available
source of information, and, so far as permissible, the opportunity has
been taken of consulting with and acquiring reliable information from
gentlemen who may have been authoritatively associated with any of
the Trials in contemplation.

"A remarkable series." Glasgow Herald.

"Altogether a most interesting and welcome series these 'Notable Scottish
Trials.'" Law Journal.

"Messrs. William Hodge & Co. are doing distinct service not only to the legal
profession, but also to the general public by the publication of ' Notable Scottish
Trials.' " Dundee Courier.

" Messrs. William Hodge & Co. are doing good public service in issuing a series of
volumes dealing with ' Notable Scottish Trials. ' Since many of these trials took
place a new generation has arisen, to whom most of the persons tried are mere names,
and the series promised by Messrs. Hodge & Co. will necessarily take the form of
educative works of considerable historic value." The Scotsman.

"While abounding in the dramatic interest of the 'higher crime," they are edited
with all the completeness and accuracy and attention to the legal issues involved of
reports intended for lawyers ; and there is no class of reading more useful for students
of law than the study of the laws of evidence as they appear in practice during such
trials. At the same time for the general reader they have the intense fascination of
revelation of the darker side of human nature. " Saturday Review.



Notable Scottish Trials

THE TRIAL OF MADELEINE SMITH. Edited by A. DUNCAN
SMITH, F.S.A.(Scot), Advocate. Dedicated to Lord Young.
Fully illustrated. Demy 8vo, 400 pp. Price 53. I 95-

" As a record of one of the most remarkable criminal trials of modern times, the
book will be found of supreme interest." The Scotsman,

" The publishers are to be congratulated on their selection of Mr. Duncan Smith as
the editor of the present number. He brings to his task a delightful freshness, and
unfolds the romantic tale in a truly romantic manner. . . . It is only when we
come to the appendices that the real importance of Mr. Smith's report is apparent.
Those show an amount of research unequalled in any report of the trial yet issued.
. . . It is not too much to say that, if the succeeding volumes maintain the high
standard of work which marks the present number, the series should have a ready
and abundant market," Glasgow Herald.



THE TRIAL OF THE CITY OF GLASGOW BANK DIRECTORS. Edited
by WILLIAM WALLACE, Advocate, Sheriff-Substitute, Oban. Fully
illustrated from contemporary photographs. Demy 8vo, 500 pp.
Price 53. 1905-

"The evidence on both sides is given verbatim, and the entire work of editing has
been exceedingly well done by Mr. William Wallace. There are some excellent
portraits." Glasgow Citizen.

"Mr. Wallace, the editor, has discharged his duty admirably, and his skilful
guidance is exceedingly helpful and valuable. The introductory chapter is a
singularly lucid and effective piece of writing." Aberdeen Daily Journal.



THE TRIAL OF DR. PRITCHARD. Edited by WILLIAM ROUGHEAD,
W.S., Edinburgh. Dedicated to the late Sheriff Brand, Ayr. Fully
illustrated. Demy 8vo, 346 pp. Price 55. 1906.

"The narrative is most interesting, and one which lawyers and laymen alike will
read with fixed attention." Law Times.

" Mr. Roughead's highly interesting book." Lancet.

" One of the most absorbing of a remarkable series. "Glasgow Herald.



Notable Scottish Trials continued.

THE TRIAL OF EUGENE MARIE CHANTRELLE. Edited by A.
DUNCAN SMITH, F.S.A.(Scot.). Dedicated to Sir Henry D. Little-
john, M.D., LL.D. Demy 8vo, 250 pp. Price 53. 1906.

"The book is a thoroughly well-edited chapbook." Daily News.

" Apart from its undoubted interest as a tragic story, the book is valuable as a
judicial record." Glasgow News.

" Apart from its interest for lawyers and medical men, the book possesses a strong
fascination for the general reader. It is full of human tragedy." Dttndee Courier.

" Mr. Duncan Smith may be congratulated on the able manner in which he has
executed his task." Law Times.



THE TRIAL OF DEACON BRODIE. Edited by WILLIAM ROUGHEAD,
W.S., Edinburgh. Dedicated to the Honourable Lord Dundas.
Fully illustrated. Demy 8vo, 280 pp. Price 53. 1907.

" The work forms a valuable addition to the series of ' Notable Scottish Trials.' "
The Scotsman.

" This volume admirably edited by Mr. Roughead. . . . The editor has con-
tributed a very full and well-handled introduction." The Daily News.

"The volume is edited by Mr. Wm. Roughead, whose introduction, giving a
succinct account of the Deacon's career, is a thoroughly capable piece of work."
The Tribune.

"This biography . . . more interesting than many novels." The Daily
Telegraph.



THE TRIAL OF JAMES STEWART (The Appin Murder). Edited
by DAVID N. MACKAY, Writer, Glasgow. Dedicated to Alex-
ander Campbell Eraser. Fully illustrated. Demy 8vo, 386 pp.
Price 53. 1907-

" In compiling this addition to an important and valuable series of criminal trials,
Mr. Mackay has shown singular assiduity and industry. He has ransacked the
records and chronicles of the time with care and diligence. His introductory sum-
ming up of the case is lucid, judicious, and complete, grasping the facts with a firm
and sure hand, and exposing the hollowness of the theories of the prosecution with
convincing force." The Scotsman.

" The volume deserves a permanent place in one's library not only because of its
deep human interest, but by reason of its political and literary association."
Aberdeen Free Press.

" Mr. D. N. Mackay has done his work well, and it will doubtless tjive rise to fresh
controversies and be the mine from which new theories will be dug." The Tribune.



Notable Scottish Trials continued.

THE TRIAL OF A. J. MONSON. Edited by J. W. MORE, B.A.
(Oxon), Advocate, Edinburgh. Dedicated to the Lord Justice-
Clerk. Fully illustrated. Demy 8vo, 480 pp. Price 53.

" Mr. More has done his work of editor well, and he contributes a brief but well-
written introduction covering the facts of the whole case. . . . This book gives
an accurate account of the most famous Scottish trial of this generation. " Edinburgh
Evening News.

" The volume is got up with the same scrupulous care that has been bestowed on
the others of the series, and is illustrated in a manner which greatly assists the reader
in following the evidence." Evening Dispatch.

" The publishers have been fortunate in securing the services of Mr. More as editor.
He has done his work well. . . . Everything has been done to make this report
accurate and full." Scotsman.



THE DOUGLAS CAUSE. Edited by A. FRANCIS STEUART, Advocate,
Edinburgh. Dedicated to the Honourable Lord Guthrie. Fully
illustrated. Demy 8vo. Price 53.

"Out of the mass of material at his command, the editor has woven a narrative
of surpassing interest which will appeal to the layman as strongly as to the lawyer.
Not the least attractive part of the volume is the appendix, containing the letters
written by Lady Jane Douglas. " Scotsman.

"The volume is not the least important of the series to which it belongs, and
should have a place in every well-equipped library." Dundee Advertiser.



THE TRIAL OF CAPTAIN PORTEOUS. Edited by WILLIAM
ROUGHEAD, W.S. Dedicated to the Honourable Lord Ardwall.
Fully illustrated. Demy 8vo. Price 53.

'The reader who has mastered its contents may rest content in the knowledge that
he has exhausted the subject, so thorough and complete have been the researches of
Mr. Roughead. " Scotsman.

" Mr. Roughead's introduction seems to us the best thing yet published on the
subject. It is admirably written, and the conclusions are sober and convincing. "
The Spectator.

" It is a deeply interesting problem as set forth with painstaking scholarship by
Mr. Roughead." Outlook.

" This trial is one of the best of a very attractive, unique, and ably edited series."
Saturday Review.



Notable Scottish Trials continued.



,



THE TRIAL OF OSCAR SLATER. Edited by WILLIAM ROUGHEAD,
W.S. Dedicated to the Honourable Lord Guthrie. Demy 8vo.
Fully illustrated. Price 53.



" One cannot but admire the skill with which the introductory chapter is drawn,
the analytical examination of the evidence, the new light thrown upon some aspects
of the tale, and the fresh and patient collection in their proper order of the facts and
circumstances adduced. " Scots Law Times.

" In this interesting dramatic narrative are more than glimpses of the tortuous,
wicked paths some men tread. The volume has an abiding interest for the lawyer
and jurist, but it will also have a large constituency outside the profession." Aberdeen
Free Press.



THE TRIAL OF MRS. M'LACHLAN. Edited by WILLIAM
ROUGHEAD, W.S. Dedicated to Andrew Lang. Demy 8vo.
Fully illustrated. Price 55.

"The fifty -year-old mystery is as much a mystery now as in the sixties, and Mr.
Roughead's book will find many readers among those interested in the study of
crimes. " Westminster Gatette.

" The editor, who has justly established for himself a recognised position in this
particular domain of literature, has written an introduction which eclipses all his
former achievements. . . . The editor has obviously spared no trouble to present
this embarrassing trial to his readers in a clear and coherent form, and no better or
fuller statement of the case could well be given." Scots Pictorial.



WM. HODGE & CO., EDINBURGH AND GLASGOW.




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Online LibraryFranz MüllerTrial of Franz Muller → online text (page 22 of 22)