Frédéric Gregory Forsyth de Fronsac.

Memorial of the family of Forsyth de Fronsac online

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ted on the country by that ingenious device of modern times
called "the will of the majority." This "rubbish," to use
the language of the encyclopaedia, consisted of " beautiful and
ingenious applications of the percussion principle," a prin-
ciple which the Ordnance Department adopted afterwards
and which was applied gradually by the army dei^artments of
all nations of the world. However, the inventor, who had
refused title, wealth and honors from the greatest ruler —
Napoleon — the world has ever had, to offer the product of
his skill and knowledge to Britain — his country — was
allowed to dwell in obscurity and poverty until a year pre\-ious
to his death (June 11, 1843) when the magnanimit}' of the
government accorded him ^200 (S 1,000).



William Forsyth, O.C, LL.D., son of the late Thomas
Forsyth of Liverpool and Nova Scotia in Canada, was born
at Greenock, Scotland, in 1812. He was a graduate from
Trinity C'ollege, Cambridge, in 1834 as B.A., standing third
among the " classical trijjos " and second "Senior Optimo,"



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COL. JOSEPH BELL FOKSVTH, OF QUEBEC



FORSYTH DE FRONSAC 83

also Chancellor's medallist and Fellow of Trinity and " pro-
ceeded M.A." in 1837. HTe entered the bar at the Inner Tem-
ple in 1839, Northern Circuit and Queen's Counsel in 1857
and Bencher of the Inner Temple. He was a member of
Parliament for Marylebone and Cambridge University; Coun-
sel for the Secretary of State for India and Commissioner
for Cambridge University. He was a contributor to the
great reviews and one of the great authors of the British
Empire. His chief works are, " On the Law of Composition
with Creditors" (1841); " Hortensius, or the Duties of an
Advocate" (1849); "On the Law Relating to the Custody
of Infants" (1850); "History of Trial by Jury" (1852);
"Napoleon at St. Helena and Sir Hudson Low" (1853);
" Life of Cicero" (1864); "Cases and Opinions in Constitu-
tional Law" (1869); '"Novels and Novelists of the XVIII
Century in Illustration of the Manners and Morals of the
Age" (1871); "Hannibal in Italy; a Historic Drama"
(1872) ; " Essays Critical and Narrative" (1874) ; " Sclavonic
Provinces South of the Danube" (1876).



Sir Thomas Douglas Forsyth, C.B., K.C.S.I., etc., was
brother of the above. In the biographical sketch of Laurie's
"Distinguished AngloTndians," 2d series, p. 199, is the fol-
lowing : " In some respects Sir Douglas Forsyth may be con-
sidered as having been one of the most remarkable among our
distinguished Anglo-Indians. . . . He was educated at Rugby
(took four medals at Cambridge, and was the first in Oriental
scholarship). He entered the Bengal Civil Service in 1848,
when the final conquest of the Punjab was in progress and
on the eve of the formation of the junior division of the
Civil Service. ... At a very early stage of his career, he
was sent to this new province, the organization of which Lord
Dalhousie, the Viceroy, entrusted to the very ablest men at
his disposal, and when the Mutiny broke out, nine years after



84



FORSYTH DE FROXSAC



his arrival, he was acting as Deputy Commissioner in the Cis-
Sutlej States ... on whose tact and firmness depended the
attitude of the protected Sikh States. Mr. Forsyth took a
bold initiative in calling on the Maharajah of Puttiala for
assistance, and the appeal being promptly responded to by
that loyal chieftain, awakened a responsive echo in the Sikh
Chiefs of Iheend and Nabha. His measures for the defense
of Umballa were prompt and sufficient. He raised a police
force of Sikhs for the purpose . . . and provided for the




security of the road from I'mballa to Kurnaul u}) to the siege
and capture of Delhi. The reputation he gained during the
Mutiny ensured his rajjicl i)ron-iotion until he became in due
course Commissioner of Umballa. But in 1869 a still more
important subject than the management of the Sikhs had
come to the front; and that was our future relation with
Russia. Lord Mayo had just received the Ameer Shere Ali
in durbar at Umballa and it was considered desirable to bring
the views of the Indian government on the Central Asian
question in a clear and unmistakable form before that ot St.
Petersburg. Mr. J-'orsvth was considered tlie most competent



FORSYTH I.)E FRONSAC 85

person to be intrusted with the responsible ckity of Indian
Envoy to the Russian Court. There can be no doubt he
fully justified the confidence thus reposed in him as he cstab-
lisJicd the very basis of the arraiigeviejit zvhieh, despite the
rapid progress of R?issiaii ai'iiis in the interval, 7oas earried
out in the agreement two years ago to delimit the Afghan
frontier by a Joint eommission. The main point which he
established was that Russia consented to respect the territory
then in possession of Shere AH; and it will be found during
the negotiations zuith Russia that zue have not advaneed mueJi
beyond this stage at the /^resent moment ^

"Immediately after his return to India, Mr. Forsyth was
intrusted with a second mission, more interesting in its sur-
roundings, if less important in its consequences than his visit
to St. Petersburg. The travels of Mr. Shaw had introduced
to us the little known country of Chinese, or Eastern Turk-
estan and its famous ruler the Atalik Ghazi, or Yakoob Bey.
An envoy from this potentate visited India and Mr. Forsyth
was sent to return the visit to Yarkand. . . . The result of
the mission was that he learned something definite about a
state, which, at the time, was neither Russian nor Chinese.
Three years later he was sent on a second mission to Kashgar,
not merely that he might complete his observations of an
earlier period, but also that he might acquire precise knowl-
edge of what the future relations of Russia with this .State
would be, for at that moment Kashgar, not less than Khiva,
stood under the menace of Russian invasion. ... His report
on the mission forms a most useful guide to the politics,
natural history and physical condition of Eastern Turkestan.
For this he was made Knight-Commander of the Star of
India. His diplomatic work did not end here for in 1875 he
went to Burmah to obtain an explanation of the King's recep-
tion of Lisitai and to effect a settlement of the Karennec
question. . . . Shortly after this he retired from the service
and since his return to England he has taken prominent and



86 FORSYTH DE FRONSAC

active part as director of several of the larger Indian rail-
ways. In 1850, he married Alice, daughter of Thomas, and
granddaughter of Sir Thomas Plummer, Master of the Rolls,
by whom he had three daughters, one of whom married the
late Sir Harry Parkes. If Sir Douglas Forsyth's character
had to be summed up in a line it would be accurate to say
that he was a plain, straight-dealing, truth-telling English
gentleman, who on critical occasions exhibited the qualities
of a hero." His life has been published recently by 'his
daughter. Miss Ethel Forsyth. In addition to his other hon-
ors not mentioned above, he was made in 1874 Additional
Member of the Governor-General's Council. A peerage
would have been a not too great recognition for his valuable
service to the empire, and the majority of recent peerage
appointments have been made for less.



Capt. James Forsyth, born in 1838, entered the British
Indian service. He was settlement officer and deputy com-
missioner of Nimar ; captain on the Bengal Staff ; author of
"The Sporting Rifle and its Projectiles" (1863) and "The
Highlands of Central India, Notes on their Forests and Wild
Tribes, Natural History and Sports" (1871). He died at 38
Manchester Street, Manchester Square, London, Eng., May i,
1871.

Sir John Forsyth, inspector general of the Medical
Department, l^engal Army, 1857; honorar}- ph)sician to
Her Majesty, OTieen Victoria (1861-1883); Companion of
the Bath, and Knight Commander of the Star of India ; was
born in 1799, and (bed at West Brighton, England, January
14, 1883.



William Forsyth, son of Morris Forsyth of Turriff (see
p. 12), Aberdeenshire, was born October 24, 18 18, a graduate



FORSYTH DE FROXSAC 8/

of the Universit}- of Aberdeen and Edinburgh. He was a
noted journalist and author, who made the Aberdeen Journal
famous, of which he was editor from 1849 to 1870. He was
author of " The Martyrdom of Kalvane" (1861) ; " Idyls and
Lyrics" (1872), etc. He died at Richmond Hill, Aberdeen,
June 21, 1879. A life of him was pubHshed in 18S2, by A.
Walker.



Prof. Axdrhw Rus.^ell F"()Rsyth, M. A., F. R. S., son of
John Forsyth, was born in Glasgow. June 18, 1S58. He
graduated at the Liverpool College and at Trinity College,
Cambridge University, in 188 r, where he was "Senior
\\Tangler," "First Smith's Prizeman'' and Fellow of the
College. In 1882 he was Professor of Mathematics at new
University College, Liverpool; in 1884 Lecturer on Mathe-
matics at Trinity College, Cambridge, and Fellow of the
Roval Society in 1886. He is author of a "Treatise on
Differential FLquations " and of mathematic papers relating to
such equations, theory of functions and theory of invarian-
tive forms published in the " Transactions of the Royal
Society " and " Cambridge Philosophical Society."



The Chevalier, Major John Gerrard For.syth, of
Montreal (see p. 14), Knight of Sardinia, etc., was one of the
most distinguished and gallant of Canadian soldiers. He
received more foreign decorations for military distinction
than any other Canadian. He was born in*"Montreal, son of
John Blackwood Forsyth, by Mary, daughter of Samuel
Gerrard, first president of the Bank of Montreal. His life is
mentioned in the first edition of Morgan's " Celebrated Cana-
dians!' He was major of the 57th Foot and served with most
distinguished gallantry in the Crimean War, taking part in
the battles of Balaklava, Inkermann, Sebastapol and the



88 FORSYTH DE FRONSAC

Quarries. He led the storming party at the Redan, which is
said to have been the most successful of any storming party
in the campaign of the British in that war. He was deputed
to lead also the storming party at Kinbourn. For the
exemplary manner and great skill he showed in these several
duties, performed under the surveillance of the allied sover-
eigns, he was made a Knight with the Grand Cross of the
Legion of Honor by the Emperor, Napoleon HI ; a Knight
of the Order of Medjidie by the Sultan of Turkey'; a
Knight with the Sardinian War Medal by King Victor Em-
manuel, and given the medal with clasps by the British Gov-
ernment. At the close of the war he returned to Montreal.
He married Elizabeth Egberta, daughter of John Horseley,
of the Madras Civil Service, and granddaughter of John Byng,
5th Viscount Torrington.



Mrs. Harriette Marie Forsyth was daughter of Major-
Gen. Joseph Scott Jewett of Scarborough, Me., who had been
colonel of a Massachusetts Regiment in 18 19 and com-
mander-in-chief of the General Muster of Maine Troops in
1839. He had been Senator from the District of Maine be-
fore 1820 to the General Court of Massachusetts at I^oston,
and a commissioner on the boundary between Maine and New
Hampsiiire. His wife was Mary Parker, daughter of Robert
Parker lu-skine-Marr, of Scarborough, of the Scottish lamil}-
of Erskine, Earls of Marr, and had married Olive, daughter
of Hon. Roger Plaisted, son of Judge Ichabod Plaisted, who
under the British had been Judge of the Common Pleas Court
at York, Me., and a Royal Councillor, whose father, Capt.
Roger Plaisted, Conunandant of the Colonial I^\)rts at Salmon
Falls and Berwick, also a l\())al Councillor, was killed in
repelling an Indian attac-k, and is calletl b}- Williamson in his
History of Maine "'Hie hero of Berwick." lion. Roger
Plaisted's wife was DcM-cas, sister to Chief- Justice Prentiss





BATTLE OF FONTEXOV



FORSYTH DE FRONSAC 89

Mellen of Maine, in 1820, and aunt of Frederic Mellen the
artist and Granville Mellen the poet. General Jewett's
father, Joseph Jewett, had come from Newburyport to Port-
land before the American Re\olution, and married Ruth
McLaughlin of a noted Irish famih', who were Lords of Clan
Owen near Londonderr}', heland. He was one of the
wealthiest and one of the most reliable of the inhabitants of
Portland — then called Falmouth ; he respected the Crown
Government and when, for the sedition, conspiracy and politi-
cal treachery of the people of that place, Captain Mowat,
the British naval officer, landed and burned the town, he
spared the residence of Mr. Jewett from esteem of his person-
ality. Mr. Jewett's father was James Jewett, of Newbury-
port, Mass., by wife, Sarah Scott, daughter of a British
officer who transmitted through her his Solingen sword to
her posterity as a relic of his race. The first of this family
to America was the Hon. Maxmillian Jewett, one-time Presi-
dent (speaker) of the General Court of Massachusetts, who
came of a Norman French family (Jouet) from Bradford, W. R.
Yorkshire, to Rowley, Mass., in 1638.

Such was the worthy and distinguished ancestry of Mrs.
Harriette AL P\)rsyth. A biographical sketch of her has
appeared in the New England Historical and Genealogical
Register for 1898, the year of her death. She was of remark-
able and noble characteristics, with dauntless and hopeful
spirit, even under the shadow of great adversities of fortune.
To her family she was devoted and loyal to the sublimest
self-abnegation. She was witty, brilliant and accomplished.
On her graduation da)- she was the first pupil in music and
French, and ever after was appreciated among high-minded
l^eople for those virtues that are rare at the present time
amidst the rubbish that are filling their place. She was about
sixty-seven years of age at the time of her death, May 10,
1898.



90 FORSYTH DE FRONSAC

William F()Rs^■TH. one of the most distinguished botanists
of Scotland, born at Old Meldrum, Aberdeenshire, in 1737.
Studied arboriculture and after graduation was gardener to the
Company of Apothecaries at their physic-garden in Chelsea.
He attracted the attention of King George III who appointed
him in 17S4 Superintendent of the Royal Gardens of Ken-
sington and St. James. In 1768 he had invented a compo-
sition to remedy the diseases incident to fruit trees. The
success of his experiments attracted the attention of the com-
missioners of the land revenue in 1789 and a committee of both
Houses of Parliament was appointed to report on the merits
of his discovery. The result of their inquiries was a convic-
tion of its utility, and an address was voted by the House of
Commons to his Majesty that a reward be granted Mr. For-
syth. In 1 79 1 and in 1802 he published works relating to
his discovery and to arboriculture. He was a member of the
Linnasan Society and also of other learned societies of Great
Britain and Europe.

The Right Hon. Thoma.s Spenxer Forsaith, Prime
Minister of New Zealand. He was born in 18 14 and emi-
grated to New Zealand in 1840 as a clergyman. He was sub-
proctor for the aborigines and accompanied Admiral Fitzroy,
Governor of New Zealand, to Waikanae in 1844 to confer
with the Maori Chiefs concerning the massacre of W'airu.
He was elected a member of the first House of Rein-esenta-
tives in 1854 and was appointed by tlie acting governor,
Colonel Wynward, Prime Minister under the new Constitution,
a post owing to party conflict he held but two (la\s, the ministry
being defeated by a vote cjf 22 to 11 in the House of
Representatives.




MRS. HARRIETTE MARIE FORSYTH




ARMS OF THE ARYAN ORDER OF
ST. GEORGE OF THE EMPIRE



DESCRIPTION OF ARMS

For FoKSVTH DE Froxsac: See page 7.

For Forsyth of Tailzerton, Failzertox, axu their Suii-
Brakches: On a shield argent, a cheveron engrailed gules, between 3
griffins segreant, vert, armed and membered gules.

Crest for Tailzerton : A demi-griffin, vert, armed and membered
gules.

Crest for Failzertox : A griffin head lietween two wings, dis-
played vert, beaked gules.

For Forsyth of Elgix, Cromarty axd .Suh-Hraxches : Shield
same as for Tailzerton and Failzerton except that the griffins are armed
and membered sable and ducally crowned, or.

Crest: A demi-griffin vert, armed and membered sable, ducally
crowned, or.




LORDRE SEIGNEUR-
lAL DU CANADA.



MEANING OF THE MOTTOES

Forsyth de Taii.zekjox (Latin) •' histajtrator Ruinae."
Forsyth de Tailzertox (English) " Restorer of the Ruin."
Forsyth de Failzerton (French) " Loyal a la Morte."
Forsyth de Failzertox (English) " Loyal unto Death.'"
Hamiltox, Duke of Hamilton (Latin) " Sola' Nobilitas Virtus.'"
Hamiltox, Duke of Hamilton (English) - Honor only Noble."
1>exxett. Earl of Tankarville (French) -De I)On \'ouloir servir le

Roy.""

Bexxett. Earl of Tankarville (English) -'With good faith to serve

the King.""



CHART SHOWING THE ALLIANCE OF THREE BRANCHES OF THE FAMILY.




DAVID DE FORSYTH, LORD OF DYKES IN 157) and VICOMTE DE FRONSAC



MARGUERITE
m. Capt. Jehan Denys of Honfleur, France,
great-grandson of the explorer. Their heirs were
Nicolas and Simon Denys, sons of Capt. Jacques
Denys, Sieur de la ThibaudilTe of the King's
Guard. Nicolas Denys wa« Governor of Acadia
in 1654, etc., and Vicomte de Fronsac.



MATTHEW
of Auchengray



WILLIAM
BARBARA



JAMES
of Cromarty
and Elgin



ROBERT OF FAILZERTON

Capt. JAMES OF FAILZER-
TON, m. Marguerite, d. of
Nicolas Denys, Vicomte de
Fronsac.



RICHARD
NICOLAS, d. s. 1



MARGUERITE, m.

Capt. James Forsaith

of Failzerton.



Hon. MATTHEW ALEXANDER THOMAS
of Chester, N. H. of Cork

ENSIGN WILLIAM
of Deering, N. H.



FREDERIC, Vicomte de Fronsac



FRKDERIC GREGORY,Vicomte de ]



THOMAS SCOTT



ALEXANDER



ROBERT JOHN

JOHN



WILLIAM JOHN H. ANNE J. MARGARET BENNETT.






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Online LibraryFrédéric Gregory Forsyth de FronsacMemorial of the family of Forsyth de Fronsac → online text (page 6 of 6)