Frederic Leonard Washburn.

Further observations on Minnesota birds : their economic relations to the agriculturist online

. (page 2 of 2)
Online LibraryFrederic Leonard WashburnFurther observations on Minnesota birds : their economic relations to the agriculturist → online text (page 2 of 2)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


and prairies — not of wooded sections, where we find these fisher-
men abundantly represented. Its food consists of frogs and fish,
but grasshoppers and field mice are not scorned. Like the king-
fisher, it may become destructive when frequenting the ponds of
the fish-breeder.



THEIR ECONOMIC RELATIONS TO THE AGRICULTURIST 23

THE SNOWY OWL AND GREAT HORNED OWL.




As supplementing a plea made in Circular 32, in behalf of
birds of prey as a class, we introduce here figures and brief notes
of two of our owls not mentioned in the earlier publication. The
first-named, to be sure, is not a common bird in Minnesota. When
seen, it is generally in the winter season, at which time we have
occasionally observed it in the bare fields. Our field notes, how-
ever, show that this bird was met with occasionally in Otter Tail
County in October and November, some years ago. It is, how-
ever, distinctly a boreal bird, pushing its migrations southerly
only in its search for food.

The Great Horned Owl, however, arriving here sometimes as
early as February is a common bird within our state borders.



24



FUKTHEK OBSERVATIONS ON MINNESOTA BIRDS:



Rabbits, gophers, muskrats, field mice, and other night-prowling
animals represent a large share of the diet of this owl ; poultry,
too, if farmers allow their turkeys and chickens to roost in tops
of trees, on sheds, or on exposed farm wagons. Even skunks
(note the illustration) are highly prized by them for food; in fact.




Great Homed Owl



when captured, they are frequently strongly scented with skunk
odor. With the exception of the skunk, which is ordinarily a use-
ful citizen, the other mammals mentioned must be regarded as
injurious — most of them decidedly so; hence this owl is, to a
large degree, a benefactor.





2

Online LibraryFrederic Leonard WashburnFurther observations on Minnesota birds : their economic relations to the agriculturist → online text (page 2 of 2)