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Frederic Louis Billon.

Annals of St. Louis in its territorial days, from 1804 to 1821; being a continuation of the author's previous work, the Annals of the French and Spanish period online

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Sept. 19, 1819, here the party passed the winter
of 1819-20 in cabins they built to shelter them.

In October Majors Long and Jessup repaired
to Washington to report progress and obtain
funds, and rejoined his party in May, 1820, and in
July having sent back the steamer under com-
mand of Lieut. Graham,' he left the cantonment
to prosecute his expedition by land.

THE ST. LOUIS GUARDS.

1819, Dec. 29. A volunteer company of Light In-
fantry has been formed in this town, denominated
the "St. Louis Guards."



MISSOURI GAZETTE. 9^

The following officers were elected : —
Captain, Henry "W. Conway; 1st Lieut., Geo.
H. Kennerly; 2nd Lieut., Amos J. Bruce; 3rd
Lieut., Josiah Bright; Ensign, Jno. B. Sarpy;
Orderly Sergt., Chas. "Wahrendorff ; 2nd Sergt.
Charles Keemle ; 3rd Sergt., William Kenshaw;
1st Corp'l, David B. Hoffman; 2nd Corp'l^
Wilson McGunnegle; 3rd Corp'l, Stephen Rec-
tor; Treas., William Eenshaw.

1820, Feb. 22nd. The first parade of the company
took place in honor of the day, at which they
made a fine display.



MISSOUEI GAZETTE, ESTABLISHED BY JOS.
CHAKLESS, SB.

1808, July 12, 'No. 1 issued on a sheet of foolscap
8 by 12 incbes, there being no suitable paper in
the place.

1809, July 19. Editorial on the completion of the
first year : —

" He regrets that his paper, under the untoward
" circumstances under which he labored for the
" first year, did not come up to his own calcula-
" tions, and perhaps to the expectations of his-
" patrons — but now having disposed of his office
" in Lexington, Ky., and brought his family to
St. Louis, together with a supply of good
paper, trusts that he will henceforth meet the
" expectations of his friends."



100 HISTORICAL.

July 26. An editorial upon the death of Thomas
Paine at 'New York, on June 24th.

Nov. 30. ISTame of the paper changed to " Louisi-
ana Gazette," as more appropriate.

1810, July 19. Completion of the second year.

1811, July 18. Completion of the third year.

" Nov. 9. Mr. Charless calls upon those of his
^' subscribers who gave their notes or word of
^' honor to pay in flour or corn to bring it in di-
*' rectly. Others who promised to pay in heef or
" porTc, to deliver it as soon as possible, or their
" accounts will be placed in the magistrate's
" hands."

MISSOURI GAZETTE.

1812, July 18. " Congress having changed the
" name of this Territory, the editor also changes
" his paper to its fii'st appellation, ' Missouri Ga-
" zette.' "

August 15. Close of the fourth year.

1813, August 2]. Close of the fifth volume of the
paper.

1814, Feb. 19. From a communication in this paper,
" it appears that Gov. Howard returned to St.
" Louis in April, 1813, with an appointment as
' ' Brigadier General. He acted as Governor for a
" few weeks, until the expiration of his commis-
" sion as such, and then there was a vacancy in



MISSOURI GAZETTE. 101

" the office, until Gov. Clark accepted the appoint-
"ment in July. The article then animadverts
"upon Gov. Howard's course in the subject
" matter."

Sept. 24. Close of the 6th volume of this papei-.

1815, Jan. 21. Mr. Charless, at the request of a
subscriber in Washington County, gives an ac-
count of the affair between Majors Wm. C. Carr,
Clement B. Penrose and Wm. Christy, and Doc-
tors Farrar and Walker on one part, and himself,
alone, on the other, and of what transpired be-
tween them in his office on Sunday, and " of their
" subscription of $1,000 to start a new paper, and
" buy a printer of their own to conduct it as they
" should dictate."

Sept. 23. Close of the 7th volume of the paper.

1816, July 13. Editorial of Mr. Charless on St.
Louis :

" In the year 1795 I first passed down the Ohio
" to the Falls, where a few stores and taverns con-
" stituted Louisville a town. Cincinnati was a
" village, and the residence of the soldiers thatde-
"fend the ]^. W. Territory, the country between
" to Pittsburg a wilderness, the haunt of the Sav-
" ages. See it now in 1816. Both banks of the
" Ohio sprinkled with farms, villages and towns.
"Some with a population of 5,000 or more, with
" banks, steam mills, and manufactures of leather,
" wool, cotton and flax, the various metals, schools
" and seminaries, and teachers in every village.



•f



102 HISTORICAL.

" The above is noticed as a contrast to the opu-
" lent town of St. Louis, with a capital of one
" million dollars, it has but few manufactures, no
" respectable seminary, no place of worship for
'* dissenters, no public edifices, no steam mills,
"nor boats, no bank. Mr. Philipson has just
" established a brewery, Mr. Wilt a white and red
*' lead factory, Mr. Hunt a tanning establishment,
" and last, Mr. Henderson's soap and candle man-
" ufactory, would be of great utility had it re-
" ceived that patronage it so richly merits," and
concludes, his remarks by saying, " that machin-
" ery of every description are needed here, and
" particularly a man of capital to erect a steam
" mill, who would soon realize a fortune, and to
" establish a distillery, as at least 5,000 barrels of
" whisky are annually received fr'om the Ohio and
" sold at 75 cents a gallon, while thousands of
" bushels of grain are offered at a very low price
" to any man who will establish a distillery."

1816, Sept. 21. " We have not been able to learn
"the particulars of the late affray at St. Gene-
" vieve, in which Augustus Demun was killed."
Editor.

Sept. 16. Close of the 8th volume.

1817, Sept. 20. Close of the 9th volume.

1818, Sept. 11. " The account of Win. Tharp's trial
" for shooting Wm. Smith came too late for this
"number."



MISSOURI GAZETTE. 103

Sept. 18. Close of the 10th volume.

1819, Sept. 15. Completion of volume 11th.

1820, Sept. 13. Completion of the 12th volume.

ME. CHAKLESS' VALEDICTORY TO HIS PATRONS.

This number closes the 12th year of his editorial
labors. The paper was established when the popu-
lation of the whole territory, now the State, hardly
numbered 12,000 inhabitants ; it had been ceded but
four years. The original subscription was but 170
(now increased to 1,000), and the advertising list
small ; my means were limited, and the establish-
ment supported with difficulty ; but by perseverance
in a straight forward course, assisted by kind friends
and patrons , he is gratified to know that he transfers
it to his successor in a prosperous and successful
condition, and returns his grateful acknowledgments,
etc. Joseph Charless.

Sept. 13, 1820.*



* Note. ^ The early flies are incomplete, many numbers missing, torn,
cut or defaced. The first book was made up from papers which had been
delivered to subscribers from the names on them.

Mr. Charless had his printing office from 1808 to 1816, eight years, in
an old stone house, east side of Main street below Elm (afterwards the
Bank of St. Louis and Post-office.) In 1816 he removed It to his new
frame, at the southeast corner of Second and Walnut streets.

After Mr. Charless sold the paper to Cummins, from Pittsburg, C.
moved it to the Sanguinet stone house, northeast corner Main and Elm.

In 1822, when re-purchased by Edward Charless, he removed it back to
his father's frame, and not long afterwards next door to the new bank
on Main street.



104 HISTOBICAL.



" TO THE PATRON'S OP THE MISSOURI GAZETTE.

" With this number the estabhshment of the
" Missouri Gazette is transferred to the subscriber,
" who will hereafter conduct the paper. He as-
" sures the public that he is the sole proprietor,
"and totally disconnected Avith any other person
" in the purchase of the establishment; and trusts
*' that he will so conduct the paper as to merit the
" approbation and support of his patrons and the
" public, etc., etc.

" The paper will be issued as heretofore on
" every Wednesday.

" James C. Cummhsts."
Sept. 13, 1820.*



THE OPPOSITION PAPER.
1814.

About this time certain prominent gentlemen of
aristocratic tendencies, who from their lineage,
position, and early training, had become leaders
of society, and imagined themselves of bluer
blood than the common herd, had for some time
past, been endeavoring to get up distinctions in
society by assuming to control Mr. Charless in
the conduct of his paper, denouncing certain edi-

* Cummins was the proprietor of tlie paper for 18 months, from Sept.
13, 1820, to March 20, 1822. He preserved no files, add to this, the last
four months of Mr. Charless' ownership, whose files are not found, and
we have a period of 22 months in which the flies are lacking. F. L. B.



THE OPPOSITION PAPER. 105

torials and communications which Mr. Charless in
his independent obstinate course produced in his-
columns from time to time, and which resulted in
a personal attack on him, in his own office by
some five or six of them variously armed, on
Sunday, Feb. 6, 1814, Mr. C. defending himself
as best he could with his sMllaly.^

1815. In the spring of 181 5, these parties, raised by
subscription the sum of $1,000, procured a press,
and materials, and engaged Mr. Joshua Korvell,.
from !N^ashville, Tennessee, to manage it.

The first number appeared in May, 1815, as the
" Western Journal,^' it was a failure financially,
it being sustained by an additional subscription.

Sergeant Hall, a lawyer from Cincinnati, was-
the next editor, who issued " his " first number on
May 17, 1817, as the " Western Emigrant,^''
conducting it with no better success than the
first.

In the summer of 1819, it passed into the banda
of Isaac "N". Henry, from Ifashville, as proprietor,
and Col. Thos. H. Benton, editor, who again
changed its name to the " 8t. Louis Enquirer.''''

A singular fatality appears to have accom-
panied this paper through its first decade, in its
frequent change of ownership, Mr. Henry had
owned it but two years when he died in June,
1821.



* The details of this affair, too long to produce in this work, are to be^
found in his flies of the period.



106 HISTORICAL.

A succeeding editor, Patrick Henry Ford, died
Jan. 20, 1827.



Early in the year 1820, the population of Missouri
Territory having grown to upwards of 60,000, far
above the then ratio for a member of Congress, an
act ' ' authorizing the inhabitants of that Territory
' ' to take the proper steps to form a Constitution
*' and State Government," was passed and approved
by the President, James Monroe, March 6, 1820.

According to the provisions of the Act, the elec-
tion of delegates to the convention, was held
throughout the Territory viva voce, on the first
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of May, ensuing
(1820).

The convention assembled at Wm. Bennett's
Mansion House Hotel, corner Vine and Third
streets, on the second Monday, June 12, 1820, and
was in session about five weeks.

The Constitution* was completed and signed on
the third Wednesday, July 19th.

The first State election under it, for the ofiicers
provided for the State government, was held on the
fourth Monday, August 28th, 1820.

The Legislature assembled in St. Louis at its
first session on the third Monday, Sept. 18, 1820,
at which Alexander McISTair was duly inaugurated
as the first Governor of the State.



* Mostly the work of David Barton.



STATE CONSTITUTION. 107

He made the following appointments : —

Joshua Barton, Secretary of State.
Edward Bates, Attorney-General.
William Christy, Auditor of Accounts.
Pierre Didier, State Treasurer.
William Gr. Pettus, Private Secretary.

This first session of the State Legislature passed a
number of acts, setting the State government in
operation, elected two United States Senators to
Congress, David Barton and Thos. H. Benton, who
with John Scott, the Representative elect, spelit
the winter of 1820-21 in Washington, unable to
obtain tlieir seats, we not yet admitted to the
Union for the following reasons : —

When Congress assembled at Washington in
Dec, 1820, the Constitution of the ISTew State of
Missouri was submitted for its approval, it took
the usual course, and was submitted to the appro-
priate committee who reported, objecting to several
clauses in it, which gave rise to much discussion and
long delay — finally Congress adopted a resolution
on March 2, 1821, " providing for the admission
*' of Missouri, on amending her Constitution in
*' regard to the obnoxious clauses."

For this purpose the Gov., Mcll^air, convened a
special session of the Legislature, it met at St.
Charles, June 4, 1821, and after a brief session,
adopted the amendments proposed by Congress.
Whereupon the President of the United States,
James Monroe, issued his proclamation of Aug. 10,



108 HISTOEICAL.

1821, declaring- the admission of Missouri as the
24th State of the Union.

Extract from the Governor's Message at this
first special session : —

Gentlemen of the General Assembly:

lu discharge of the duties required of me by the Constitution, I have
convened you at this early period, for the purpose of laying before you
several matters which appear to me urgent in their nature, and of vital
importance to the State, hoping from your wisdom and prudence a
remedy for some of the evils under which the country labors, which my
own reflection has not been able to devise.

This measure, which will necessarily occasion a considerable public
expense, has not been adopted without the matured deliberation, and
absolute conviction, on my part, that the public interest and safety re-
quire the prompt interposition of the General Assembly. Since the first
organization of this government, we have exhibited to the American
people a spectacle novel and peculiar — an American Republic on the
confines of the Federal Union, exercising all the powers of sovereign
government, with no actual political connexion with the United States^
and nothing to bind us to them but a reverence for the same principles,
and an habitual attachment to them and their government, &c. * » ►

Albx'b McNaik.

St. Charles, 4th June, 1821.



BUSINESS NOTICES.



I-EOM THE FILES OF THE MISSOURI GAZETTE.



CASH

given for Bills of Exchange on the Grovernment.

Wilkinson & Price.
St. Louis, July 12, 1808.

A variety of School Books for sale, and. Blanks
printed at this office on short notice.
July 26, 1808.

XEKBMIAH CONNOR, AUCTIONEER,

will sell to the highest bidder, for cash, at 10 A.
M., on Tuesday, Aug. 3d, 1808, at' the house of
Mrs. Labadie, an invoice of goods amounting to
between 7 and 800 dollars. Cogniac Brandy, three
years in cellar, Dry Goods, Chewing Tobacco,
Saddlery and Hardware.
July 23, 1808.

WILLIAM HARRIS, HATTER,

in all its branches, next door to Doct. Saugrain's.
Aug. 17, 1808.

(109)



110 BUSINESS NOTICES.

N^OTIOE.

Whereas, ray wife Polly has left my bed and
board, I will pay no debts of her contracting.
Aug. 8, 1808. Thomas Beavers.

BOARDING.

Two or three young men may have boarding on
reasonable terms. Enquire at this office.
Aug. 17, 1808.

CALVIlSr BURNS, TAILOR,

wants two or three journeymen immediately ; good
wages.
Aug. 2i, 1808.

A I'INE COACHEE

for sale. Enquire at this office.
Sept. 7, 1808.

RUEUS EASTON

requests all for whom he is agent on Land Claims
to bring their testimony before the Commissioners,
before the 1st day of I^overaber next.
Sept. 7, 1808'.

NOTICE.

The subscriber, intending to leave this Territory,
will offer at public sale, on Monday the 12th inst.,
all his household furniture, with a small collection
of valuable books, etc.

One or two likely young negroes, and a pair of
handsome, well matched horses. J. Brtote.

Sept. 7, 1808.



BUSINESS NOTICES.' HI

WILSON P. HUNT AND JOHN HANKINSON

have recently added to their former stock, a gen-
eral assortment of merchandise, for sale low for
cash.

Sept. 14, 1808.

EAGLE TAVERN.

Resin Webster has opened a house of entertain-
ment, in the building lately occupied by General
William Clark.

]Sr. B. — A few genteel boarders can be accom-
modated.

Ifov. 2, 1808.

JACOB PHILIPSON, FROM PHILADELPHIA,

is now opening at his new store, opposite the
Post-office, a general assortment of Dry Goods and
Groceries, for sale for cash at reasonable prices.
]S"ov. 10, 1808.

HORACE AUSTIN & CO., STE. GENEVIEVE,

have just received an assortment of Dry Goods
and Groceries, purchased in 'New York for cash,
will be sold low for cash or lead.
Jan. 4, 1809.

JUST RECEIVED,

at the store of Bernard Pratte, a complete assort-
ment of Dry Goods, Groceries, Liquors, Iron and
Steel.

Jan. 11, 1809.



112 BUSINESS NOTICES.

FALCONER & COMEGTS

have just received, and for sale, a general assort-
ment of merchandise.
April 19, 1809.

PEIMM & DAVIS, TAILORS,

have entered into partnership, and will continue
the business in P. Primm's old stand, opposite
the late Mr. Robidoux's.
April 25, 1809.

DOCTOR FARRAR

will practice medicine and surgery in St. Louis ;
his office is in Mr. Eobidoux's house, Second
•street.

May 16, 1809.

JEREMIAH CONKOR, AUCTIONEER,

will sell at auction, Thursday, June 15, at 9 o'clock
A. M., at the store of Hunt & Hankiiison, the stock
of goods of said firm, to close business.
May 30, 1809.

AUCTION SALE,

on Monday, June 12, at the store of Alexander
McKeever, next door to Madame Robidoux, all the
remaining stock of goods now in said store.
May 31, 1809.

VACCINATION.

Doct. Saugrain gives notice of the first vaccine
matter brought to St. Louis. Indigent persons
vaccinated gratuitously.

May 26, 1809.



BUSINESS NOTICES. 113

"WANTED,

two or three journeymen carpenters ; good wages
and constant work. Norman Mackenzie.

May 31, 1809.

DISSOLUTION.

The copartnership of Wilson P. Hunt and John
Hankinson is this day dissolved by mutual consent.
Wilson P. Hunt will settle the affairs of the late
firm.
. June 10, 1809.

JOHN KERR

has just opened in the store recently occupied by
Hunt & Hankinson, a stock of fresh Dry Goods,
Groceries, and Hardware, for sale at reasonable
prices for cash.
July 5, 1809.

L. T. HAMPTON,

skin dressing and breeches making, in Mrs. Robi-
doux's house, known as the Council house, near
Webster's tavern.
June 29, 1809.

MATTHEW KERR

has opened in the store formerly occupied by Hunt
& Hankinson an assortment of fresh Dry Goods,
Groceries, and Hardware, for sale at reasonable
prices.
July 5,



114 BUSINESS NOTICES.

MICHAEL DOLAIJ'S ,

tailor shop, in the same house with L. T. Hampton,
Breeches Maker and Glover.
June 29, 1809.

BERNARD LALENDE,

Merchant Tailor, lately from Bordeaux, has the lat-
est fashions of London and Paris. Cloth and other
stuffs always on hand. He has for sale Bordeaux
Wine, Coffee, and Imperial Tea, an assortment of
the best Fiddle Strings.
Sept. 6, 1809.

B. BEETHOLD AND R. PAUL,

lately arrived from Baltimore and Philadelphia, have
for sale an elegant assortment of Dry Goods and
Groceries at moderate prices. Their store is at Mr.
"Valois', Main street.
Sept. 13, 1809.

GROVE TAVERN.

James H. Audrain has just opened a public
house in Mr. Cerre's large stone house, IS'orth Main
street. He solicits the patronage of a generous
public.

Sept. 13, 1809.

WM. CHRISTY

will take in keeping on moderate terms, a few horses,
by the week or month. Excellent pasture and
plenty of grain .
Aug. 29, 1809.



BUSINESS NOTICES. 115

1809. !N"ov. 16, Jno. N". Maclot having com-
pleted the erection of his Shot Tower at Her-
culaneum, — the first in the West, — gives notice
to his friends and public that he will manufac-
ture lead into drop-shot on reasonable terms.

Kocky Place, below the mouth of the Joachim,
adjoining Herculaneum.

1810. Early this year a second Shot Tower was
erected at Herculaneum, by Moses Austin, of
Mine a Breton.

JACOB PHILIPSON

has removed his store to next north of Mr. Charles
Gratiot's house, where he has added largely to
his former stock.
Oct. 12, 1809.

ISAAC SEPTLIVEE8

proposes to teach Drawing, Geography, Mathe-
matics and French Grammar. He can be found
at Mr. Vincent Bonis, Sr.
Nov. 16, 1809.

J. PAHSr AND AKMSTEONG, TAILORS,

have commenced business near the Post Ofiice,
they also carry on Skin Dressing and Breeches
Making.

my. 30, 1809.

JOHN STEELE

has just opened a Stock of New Goods next door
to Mad'e Robidoux's, with about 2,000 gallons
Whisky, etc.
Dec. 7, 1809.



116 BUSINESS NOTICES.

WILLIAM SHANNON

is now opening at the house of Francis Benoit a
complete assortment of Goods of the newest and
most fashionable styles.
Dec. 14, 1809.

WILLIAM SHANNON

has just received a quantity of Drugs and Medicines,
which he will sell at moderate prices.
Dec. 28, 1809.

SAMUEL PEEBY

has just opened in the store formerly Hunt & Han-
kinson, an assortment of fresh Dry Goods and
Groceries.
Dec. 28, 1809.

MATTHEW KERR

has just returned from Philadelphia with a well
chosen assortment of Merchandise, which he will sell
at the most reasonable terms.
Jany. 13, 1810.

ERESH GOODS.

We have recently added to our former Stock, a
supply of goods suitable for the present and ap-
proaching seasons, for sale on the lowest terms.

Beethold & Paul.
Feb. 22, 1810.

EALCONER & COMEGYS,

desirous of closing out their stock of merchandise,
will dispose of it at very low prices.
Jany. 30, 1810.



BUSINESS NOTICES. 117

ENTERTAINMENT.

Joseph Charless informs his friends that he receives
Boarders by the day, week or month. Travelers
can be accommodated with as good fare as the town
affords, on moderate terms. Stabling for 8 or 10
horses.

StIBSCKIBERS

to the Paper are requested to pay up. Pork and
flour received.
April 19, 1810.

H. M. SHKEVE & CO. (PERGUS MOORHEAd)

have brought from Philadelphia, and opened next
door to the house of the late Joseph Robidoux, a
complete assortment of Dry Groods, Groceries, Hard-
ware, China and Qneensware, Iron, Steel, Cast-
ings and Stationery, to be disposed of low for
Cash.

April 23, 1810.

WOOD & DUNN

have just arrived from Philadelphia with a gen-
eral assortment of Dry Goods, Groceries, etc., etc.,
for sale at the late stand of Hunt & Hankinson.
April 23, 1810.

ST. VRAIN'S and HABB'S BREWERY,

at Belief ontaine. Edward Hempstead will always
have a supply of strong and table beer in his cellar.
April 28, 1810.



118 BUSINESS NOTICES.

MR. GEORGE PESOAT

informs the public that he has just arrived from
Philadelphia and has opened in the house formerly
occupied by Mr. Eobidoux, a complete assortment
of Dry Groods, Groceries and Crockery Ware.
April 18, 1810.

CHEAP GOODS.

John Arthur has just opened a quantity of country
linen, cotton cloth, cotton. and wool cards, iron,
steel, etc., etc., which he will sell on low terms, and
will take in payment furs, hides, whisky, maple
sugar, bacon and beeswax.
April 19, 1810.

NOTICE.

The firm of Falconer & Comegys is this day dis-
solved, Mr. P. Falconer retiring. J. G. Com-
egys & Co., the new firm, is just opening,
from Baltimore & Philadelphia at the store op-
posite Mr. Charles Gratiot, a general assortment
of merchandise, to sell for- Cash, Lead or Beaver.
May 7, 1810.

GEORGE TOMPKISrS

will open a school in St. Louis in the house of M.
Alvarez, on Monday, May 7th.
May 1, 1810.

GEK'l. WM. CLARK.

United States Agent for Indian Department.
July 12, 1810.



BUSINESS NOTICES. 119

WILLIAM CHRISTY

has rssumed his old stand on Main Street, opposite
Col. A. Chouteau's, where he has opened a house
of public entertainment, and hopes to receive the
public patronage.

He is provided with Liquors of the best kind, and
good pasture for horses, with corn, oats and green
clover.

June 27, 1810.

PATRICK LEE,

Auctioneer, Broker arid Commission Merchant,
near the Post Office, is well provided with Dry
Goods, Groceries, etc. His house and cellar is well
calculated for storing goods.
July 10, 1810.

HESLEP & TATLOK.

Windsor and Fancy Chair-makers, adjoining Jno.
Coon's shop. Work superior to any in the west.
Penciled and gilt in the finest Philadelphia fashion.
July 26, 1810.

THE FIRM OF H. M. SHRBVE & CO.

is this day dissolved. Fergus Moorhead will con-
tinue alone at the old stand.
Aug. 11, 1810.

HORACE AUSTIN

is opening at the old stand of Falconer & Comegys,
a handsome assortment of Dry Goods and Queens-
ware.

Sept. 15, 1810.



120 BUSINESS NOTICES.

ETIFUS EASTON, POSTMASTER,

has removed the Post Office to his new etone
residence on Third Street under Court House
hill.

:N'ov. 12, 1810.

matthew kerb

has just returned from Philadelphia with an ex-
tensive assortment of Merchandise, to dispose of on
very reasonable terms.



Online LibraryFrederic Louis BillonAnnals of St. Louis in its territorial days, from 1804 to 1821; being a continuation of the author's previous work, the Annals of the French and Spanish period → online text (page 6 of 24)