Frederick George Afflalo.

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Berlin, W* 50.

Union of German Women Writers (Deutscher Sckriftstellerinnenhund),
Founded in 1896 by Fraulein Wernicke. Object — ^To advance
the common interests, and to afford opportunities for social
acquaintance and mutual knowledge of writings. Membership
— Exceeds 100. Organ — Das Recht der Feder, Transactions
are issued irregularly. Fortnightly meetings are held. Presi-
dent — Frau Helene Wachsmuth. Directress — Frau L. Braun,
N. Bayreutherstrasse 13, Berlin.

Union of German Writers {Deutscher Schrifistetter Verbark), i^ounded
October, 1887. Objects — ^Tb further the interests of German
authors, and to provide for such of its members as are inca-



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632 THE LITERARY YEAR-BOOK [part ii.

pacita.ted by reason of age. Legal advice is given gratis* as
also inionaation concerning <^ianneto for work. The Society
possesBes a house for retired writers, Demmins Hort. at
Wiesbaden. The organ of the Society is LiUerarische Praxis,
Subscription^-^^ght marks per annum. Secretary — Hxinrich
Abrahms. Office — Chark>ttenstrasse 37, Berlin. W.

Wagner Endowment Fond (i?. Wagner Siipendien-Stiftung), Founded
by Richard Wagner in 1882 to assist friends and students of
music of small means to attend the Bayreuth festivals. Grants,
as a rule, are only made to members of the Wagner Society
(see below). Director — Max Grosz, Bajn-euth.

Wagaar Soaiety {Der alleemeine R, Wagner-Verein), 1883. Object
— To foster the works of Richard Wagner by giving assistance
to duly accredited students to visit the festival at Bajrreuth.
There are fifty-eight representatives of the Society throughout
the world, and twenty-seven branches have been formed. 1

Yearly Subscription — ^Four marks. Forty per cent, of the
annual income of the Society is contributed to the R. Wagner '

Stipendien-Stiftung (see supra) ; forty per cent, is applied in 1

the purchase of free tickets for the members of the Society ;
and the remaining twenty per cent, is carried to the Festival
Endowment Fund, the interest of which is applied in support
of the Bayreuther Bldtter. Treasurer — Herr Thblen. Central
Office — Eichhomstrasse 2, BerUn, W. President — Dr. Cassel-

MANN.

HOLLAND

In almost all provinces of the Netherlands there is a provincial
Society wmch chiefly has for object the history, especially of
customs and habits, of former times. Also in several towns
an atTihaeologica] Society for local history, etc. Many of these
societies have a library and a mnseum.

There are also an HIittorfeal 8oel«ty {Secr^ary — ^Dr. S. Muller.
Utrecht) and a SadarL Ondhaldknndlgt Bond {SoGretaty —
Dr. OVBRVOORDB, Leiden).

In Friesland there is a special Frisian Soeiety entirely devoted to the
atudy, maintenance, and promotion of the Frisian langnage.

In Leiden exists the most famous Maatiabappy van Madariaadseha
l^tteriLUide* This society possesses a eylondid library (^f.Leiden).
and annually elects twenty members from HolUmd and ei^ht
Irom abroad, and publishes yeaiiy an Annnal and biogiaphies
of deceased members ; also a tydschnft (periodical for philology
and literary history), philological and historical tracts (to-day
inier alia a repertory of Dutch History and Archaeology),
gives critical eoUions of medieval texts and reprints of rare
books (cf^ prospectus).

ITALY

8oalatr of Italian Aoibocs {Societd Italiana degli AutoH), Founded
1882. Objects — ^To safeguard the rights and interests of authors ;
to give assistance in case of illness or inability to work. In



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PART II.] SOCIETIES 633

feneral the constitution of the Sodetjr resembles that of the
'rench Society of Authors. Publication — / DirUti d^AtUore,
a monthly journal. Subscription — Entrance fee, ten lire ;
annual subscription, twenty lire. President — Giovanni
ViscoNTi Venosta. Director, Marco Praoa. Secretary —
Giuseppe Borghi. Address — Corso Venezia 4, Milan.



HOBWAT

The Authors' Union (Forfatterforening). This is an old and well-
established association of Norwegian authors for the furthering
and protection of literary rights. The Society has no pension
fund. O^e— Christiania.



SWEDEN

Stockholm PnUietst Club {Publicist klubben). A well organized
Society for union and protection of journalists of all parties,
and the assistance of members and their families. At the same
time a social centre for the literary life of Stockholm. The
Society is connected with press societies throughout the country.
President — Adolf Hallgren. Address — Stockholm. Member
in London — ^Mr. Fritz Hbnriksson, 33 Cloudesdale Road,
S.W., National Liberal Club, and The Press Club.



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PUBLIC, UNIVERSITY, COLLEGE, AND
OTHER LIBRARIES

COMPILED
WITH THE APPROVAL AND ASSISTANCE

OF THE

LIBRARY ASSOCIATION



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CONTENTS

PAGB

PREFACE 637

THE year's work - - 64O

HOW TO BECOME A LIBRARIAN -653

PUBLIC RBADIKO- ROOMS OPENING ON SUNDAY ... 659

PUBLIC READING-ROOMS OPENING ON PUBLIC HOLIDAYS - 660

PUBLIC LIBRARIES OBLITERATING BETTING NEWS ... 662

PUBLIC LIBRARIES PUBLISHING A PERIODICAL ... 663
CLASSIFICATIONS IN USE —

DEWEY DECIMAL - 664

CUTTER EXPANSIVE 664

ADJUSTABLE 665

SUBJECT 665

INDICATOR LIBRARIES —

ALL STOCK 666

FICTION ONLY 667

LEDGER CHARGING 6Sj

CARD CHARGING - - - 667

OPEN-ACCESS LIBRARIES —

SAFEGUARDED - 669

NON -SAFEGUARDED 669

LIBRARY ASSOCIATION AND ITS BRANCHES - - . . 670

LIBRARY assistants' ASSOCIATION AND ITS BRANCHES - * 673

AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION - 674

ALPHABETICAL LIST OF THE PRINCIPAL LIBRARIES IN THE

UNITED KINGDOM -675

PRINCIPAL LIBRARIES OF THE BRITISH COLONIES - - . 768

FOREIGN LIBRARIES 772

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PUBLIC LIBRARIES



PREFACE

For the second time the Library Section of the Literary
Year-Book has been prepared with the approval and with
the assistance of the Library Association. Considerable
additions and important alterations have been made in
the present issue, and it will be found that the libraries
from which returns have not been received are compara-
tively insignificant in number. In addition to the assist-
ance of the Library Association in the compilation of the
list, the Local Government Board has been drawn upon
for information. The result of this is that probably no
list in existence can compare with the Literary Year-Book,
At the same time, it is possible that a few of the districts
taken from the list of the Local Government Board may
have been included in error ; in other words, it is believed
that the names of a few places in which the Acts have
never been adopted have crept into the Local Government
Board list. The information regarding local collections
and juvenile collections has been omitted this year, because
it was found that these are incidental to most libraries,
and the fact did not require specific mention. Valuable
details have been added relating to the annual expendi-
ture, and the paragraph tables will be found of the utmost
assistance. A uniform method has been adopted with
regard to rating information, and where no statement is
made it must be understood that the library is ' not rated.'
C. = caretakers has been used to denote caretakers, cleaners,
and attendants. So many different ideas exist as to what
a caretaker really is that some such course was the only one
possible. Another improvement wU be found in the

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638 THE LITERARY YEAR-BOOK [part ii.

description of the districts and their populations, and here
the Scots ' burgh ' has been rendered into the English
' borough.'

Every librarian was asked if he had found the abbrevia-
tions of last year any drawback in the use of the LUerary
Year-Book, The replies were overwhelmingly in the
negative ; therefore tiiese abbreviations were not altered,
but, as far as possible, they have been excluded from the
additional details.

The schedule of questions was as follows :

Name of Library (Town, Address, etc.). Administrative area
(Coontv, Boroufh, Parish, etc.). Population. Year of adoption
of the Acts (or of the foundation, if not rate-supported). Librarian's
name. What rate in the £ is levied ? Does the Library pay
(0) Local or district rates ; (&) Income tax ; (c) Inhabited House
duty ? Total income from all sources (induding product of rate
if rate-supported). Annual expenditure (including branches) on
(a) Books ; (6) Binding ; (c) Periodicals ; (<2) Salaries and wa^es,
(e) Loans (including interest). Number of assistants (including
those at branches) : (a) Male ; (b) Female ; (c) Caretakers, attendants
and cleaners. Number of volumes in stock (including branches) —
in Lending Library, in Reference Library. Number of borrowers'
tickets ' in force (including branches). Annual issues (including
branches) — in Lending Library, in Reference Library. System
of classification in use — ^in Lending Library, in Reference Library :
ia) Dewey ; (b) Cutter ; (c) Adjustable ; (d) Brown's subject ;
{e) Numerical in main classes ; (/) Any oth^. Form of catalogue —
in Lending Library, in Reference Library : (a) Dictionary, printed ;
ib) Dictionary. MS. ; (c) Dictionary, MS., on cards or sheaves;
(i) Classified, printed (Sect, or com.) ; (e) Classified. MS., or (/) Qassi-
fied. MS., on cards or sheaves. Do you obliterate betting news ?
Do you open on Sundays or public holidays ? Do you publish a
periodical or bulletin ? Have you a children's reading-room and
separate lending department ? Have you lectures ? Have you
school libraries? Have you any other special features (Museums
and Art Gallery. School) ? Method of issumg and charging books —
in Lending Library, in Reference Library : (a) Indicator (i. All
stock ; 2. Fiction only) ; (b) Card charging ; (c) Ledger charging ;
(d) Application forms ; (e) Signature book. Do you allow access
to the shelves — in Lending Library, in Reference Library ? (a) Safe-
guarded access ; (6) Non -safeguarded access. Has your Committee
to submit proceedings to the Council for (a) Confirmation* ; (6) Per-
mission to act* ; (c) Report ? * Number of branches. Number of
delivery stations. Have you found the abbreviations in the 1907
returns a drawback to the ready use of the Year -Booh ?

* (a) and (6) are practically the same under ordinary circum-
stances.



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PART II.] PUBLIC LIBRARIES 639

These questions do not apply to Public Municipal Libraries,

Hours of opening. Is the public admitted to the Library ? Has
special permission to be obtained for admission ? If by special
permission, what steps are necessary to obtain it ? Date of catauogue
if not brought up to date.

The following abbreviations are uniform throughout :

=5 Reference,
■s Issues.
a= Classification,
s Catalogue.
= Dictionary.
= Obliterated.
= Open.
= Sunday.
= JuvenUe.
= Collection.
= Committee.



Inc.


s= Income.


R.


Ann.


=s Annual.


Iss.


Expend


[.= Expenditure.


Class.


Period.


— Periodicals.


Cat.


Sal.


s Salaries.


Diet.


Assist


s Assistants, or Assistant.


ObUt.


M.


= Male.


Op.


F.


=s Female.


Sund.


C.


= Caretaker.


cSu!


Vs.


=s Volumes.


L.


s= Lending.


Com.



PUBLIC LIBRARIES ASSESSED FOR LOCAL RATES.

In the cases where it is stated that inhabited portions of the
library buildings only are assessed, the names of those institutions
are not includ^ in this list, but nominal assessments are included.

Aberystwyth, Airdrie, Alloa, Alnwick, Altrincbatn, Arleodon and Fiixington. Ashby,
A;^t(m-ander-Lyne, Aspatria, Bangor, Barrow-in-Kurness, Barry, Bellie, Bideford,
Bingley, Bolton Pennr, Bonar Bridge, Bradford, Brechin, Brentford, Brighoose, Brighton,
Bristol, Bury, Oimpbeltown, Carlisle, Carnarvon. Castle Douglas, Cutleford, Chelms-
ford, Chester, Chiswick, Chorley, Claydon (Steeple), CUtheroe, Coatbridge, Colchester,
Colne, Corslorphine, Cratfield, Cromarty, Creadon, Dalton-in<Funiess, Darlington,
Denton, Derby. Devonport, Dewsbory, Douglas, Drumoak, Dnkinfiekl, Dumbairton,
Dumfries and Maxwelltown, Ealing, Eastbourne, Edinburgh^ Erdington, Evesham,
Fleetwood, Folkestone, Fraserburgh, Gainsborough, Galuhtek, Glasgow, GoftoOf
Comport and Alverstoke, Grangemouth, Gravesend, Gravs Thurrock, Crreat Crosby,
" " ' '^ .«..»-.. - »- .. ifai-rogut^ Hawick, Hertford,




AJnK»con-u|Jua* X IUUUC9, xwiuruss, xwukukiuv, xvukwiui, lamrucsi, ^jKauuiuj^um opH, l<c«us,

Leigh, Lewes, Lincoln, Liverpool, London (Chelsea, Depttord, Finsbury, Holborn,
Idington, Lewisham, Stepney, Westminster), Long Eaton, Lossiemouth, Loughborough,
Luton, Maidenhead, Malvern, Manchester, Melton Mowbray, Merthyr Tvdvil, Middtes-
brough, Millom-Morley, Nelson, Newbury, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Newton Abbot,
Newmilns, Newtown, Nottingham, Oldham, Oxford, Penge, Perth. Pontefract, Poole,
Portsmouth, Rawtenstall, Richmond, Rotherham, Rothwell, St. Albans, St. Anne's-on-
the-Sea, St. Helens. Sale and Ashton, Salford. Sandown, Selkirk, Shaftesbury, Sheffield,
Shipley^ Smethwick, South Shields. Southall-Norwood, Southend, Sowerby Bridge,
Staiybndge, Stamford, Stirling, Stockport, Stourbridge, Stratford-upon-Avon. Tedding-
ton, Thome, Todmorden, Tottenham, Wakefield, Wallasey, Walsall. Warrington,
Wednesbttiy, West Calder, Westhoughton, Weston-super-Mare, Willenhall, Wimbledon,
Wishaw, Wolverhampton, Wood Green, Worthing, Yarmouth, York.



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THE YEAR'S WORK

By a public LIBRARIAN

An annual rdsum^ is somewhat in the nature of a con-
tinuation from one year to the next. The lapse of a year
is not suflScient to make it necessary to reconsider the
profession from an abstract, or even from a practical,
standpoint ; at the same time, a year is too long a period
to warrant the treatment of transient subjects : the point
kept in view has been therefore something between these
two.

An essential preliminary feature of any review of the
year's work must be a succinct survey of the doings of
the previous year, as given in the last issue of The LUerary
Year-Book, So much of the work there described was in
an experimental, initial, or transition stage that it would
be impossible to deal adequately with the work of 1907
and give a forecast of that of 1908 without dealing in
some manner with last year's ' Introduction.' The most
obvious method of doing this is by going through the
items of that section serioHm ; at the same time omitting
from the brief summary those subjects which will be dealt
with again more fully in the consideration of this year's
work.

The Islington experiment of limiting the provision of
newspapers has excited less opposition than might have
been looked for, and it now appears certain that the scheme
will be successful. The plan is an experiment only so far
as Islington is the first large London library to adopt it. A
reference to the ' List ' will show that there are several
libraries scattered over the country from which news-
papers have been excluded more or less completely.

As a year has passed, the pubhcation of the Sound
Leather Directory — ^the natural outcome of the sound

640



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PART II.] PUBLIC LIBRARIES 641

leather movement — ^must be nearer, but the volume has
not been issued up to the time of writing.

The question of the centralisation of London boroughs
is still in a status quo. While it remains so there is no
need to deal more fuUy with the question here, nor to
dilate on the larger phase of the same subject — ^viz., the
formation of a Governmental Library Department. I
would venture to say, however, that the Local Government
Board, without much trouble or expense, might form a
small ofi&ce department to give greater attention to public
library matters in general, and to administration and
foundation in particular. I make the suggestion, which
may not be a new one, from personal knowledge of the
needs that exist in Ubrary work, and of the innate courtesy
of the Local Government Board, and of the kindly treat-
ment it is capable of exercising. Of course, the object of
such an ofiBice as I suggest would be to assist rather than
to retard, to befriend rather than to criticise, our still
struggling profession. It may be necessary to point out
that the foundation of this inter-departmental office would
not prove the death-knell of all originality and all initia-
tive on the part of pubhc librarians and their institutions ;
nor would it be the thin edge of the wedge for the forma-
tion of a Government Board, such as the Board of Educa-
tion, however much such a consummation might be desired.

The chaotic state in which educational matters still
remain leaves the burning question of school Ubraries
unsettled. Until something reasonable, and with some
degree of permanence, is laid down, either by the Board
of Education on the part of the schools, or the Local
Government Board on behalf of the libraries, it seems
futile to expect any good and equitable scheme to be
formulated and put into operation throughout the country.
Owing to a train of imfortunate circumstances, the
permanent exhibition of Best Books, which was so much
desired and appeared so near completion, has not been
realised. There is still hope for it in the future.

So much for last year.

The advance which was noticed previously has con-
tinued with as much, if not greater, rapidity in some
respects ; in others, however, the movement has been

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642 THE LITERARY YEAR-BOOK [part ii.

nearly stationary. It is a remarkable fact that the
number of new adoptions (a familiar term for those districts
adopting the Libraries Acts) has been exceedingly small —
possibly the smallest for the last decade ; and, perhaps
as a corollary of this, the requests for financial assistance
from Dr. Carnegie have almost ceased. A worse — or, at
all events, a more remarkable — ^feature of this apparent
stagnation is that there is an exceedingly large number
of districts in which the Acts have been adopted, where
promises of gifts from Dr. Carnegie have been accepted
two years ago or more, but no tendency shown to claim
the money and erect the buildings. The large number of
places in the ' List ' — ^many of them small, it is true — in
which the Acts have been adopted, but have ' not yet
been put into operation/ is more eloquent than wwds.
It would be futile to endeavour to discover the cause in each
case of what at first sight appears an emphatic arrest of
the library movement. But a general inquiry reveals the
fact that there are a great many reasons, none of which
can be regarded in any way with serious apprehension in
face of the otherwise steady and rapid advance. One of
these reasons may be found in the bad judgment, if not
the bad taste, of many local authorities in adopting the
Acts and endeavouring to get as large a promise as possible
from Dr. Cam^e, without counting the cost to themselves.
Dr. Carnegie invariably insists upon a ' help thj^elf '
doctrine ; and when some of these foolish virgins (although
the term is perhaps a misnomer when appued to parish
councillors) realised that one of the conditions of the gift
was the levying of a peimy rate, and perceived — more or
less dimly, perhaps, but nevertheless immistakably — that
the penny rate would not support the place their ambi-
tion had conceived, the matter was postponed indefinitely.
With expert assistance and modified schemes many of
these locahties might be yet in the enjo5anent of whatever
benefits a public library confers. In connexion with this
gnorance of the greater number of local authorities (a
pardonable ignorance, it is true) of pubUc library matters,
and their disastrotis refusal to obtain expert advice in the
initial stages of the buildings, it is a regrettable fact that
in twenty yeaxs' time a great many of the Carnegie libraries



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PART n.] PUBLIC LIBRARIES 643

of the present will be hopelessly antiquated, without any
possibility of a ready adaptability to what will be then
modem requirements. Some of these buildings are even
now quite unsuitable. Another point to be remembered
is that the country has passed through a trying financial
period, which has had effect upon the most remote dis-
tricts. And it may be that many of these smaller places
are waiting for the passing of the new Act to enable them
to come into the county scheme.

I do not profess to be able to prophesy in this question
myself (and this personal explanation is necessary, as last
year I was supposed to have embarked seriously in the
business of a prophet in my brief outline of the probable
trend of affairs), but many eminent members of the library
world hold the opinion that a revival will take place in
the public library movement, in the same way that an
upheaval occurred in education matters some few years
ago ; and following out the analogy of the latter, it is
considered most likely that this great revival will take
place in the public, and will be organised and vitalised
by them, although, at the same time, much of the Hfe
of this revival wm be due to those libraries keeping in the
forefront of the advance. If this idea ever takes shape,
it will result, no doubt, in a radical alteration of those
out-of-date libraries which are still administered in the
way they were many years ago. If the libraries of the
future are to grasp or maintain an important, possibly
an essential, position in the educational scheme of the
country, they must be prepared to let some of the numbers
of their issues go by the board, and be content with,
perhaps, a smaller amount of an infinitely superior kind
of work. There need be no question in this of decreasing
the fiction stock, or of obtaining a better standard of
novels. Apart from the deterioration in the tone of fiction,
it is a mere matter of simple arithmetic. Almost day by
day during the past year some reduction in the price of
cheap reprint novels or some addition to their number
has been announced. Now, pubhshers do not pubHsh for
their own amusement, and it is obvious that large issues
of these sixpenny, sevenpenny, and eightpenny novels
must be disposed of to make their continued publication

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644 THE LITERARY YEAR-BOOK [part ii.

a profitable matter. It would be labouring the point to
do more than merely state that a very large proportion of
the purchasers of these cheap novels would otherwise rely
solely upon the public library. And therein Ues another
reason why so many districts have not proceeded to give
effect to their adoptions. In some quarters this is regarded
as a disaster to the public library movement. There is,
however, another and more important side to this
question.

A little of the ultimate probable result of the publica-
tion of cheap reprint fiction is already to be seen in the
last year's work of many pubUc libraries. In innumerable
cases the issues from the lending libraries in all parts of
the country show an appreciable decrease. This decrease,
however, is accompanied frequently, if not invariably, by
a more than proportionate drop in the fiction percentage,
and is sometimes found side by side with a solid increase
in the numbers of borrowers. The si^ificance of these
statements is greatly increased by the nse in the reference
library issues which is so often found with this decrease
in the figures of the lending library. The reprints of
' standard ' works, or the ' classics,' other than novels
have no tangible effect upon public library issues. The
total number of these recent reprints is no doubt very
large, but many sets contain works found in other sets;
and the total number of standard books which can be
purchased for from sixj>ence to one shilling and sixpence
(the amount to which the ordinary purchaser will rise)
is much smaller than at first sight appears probable, and
has very Uttle to compare with the number of volumes
in even one of the smaller medium-sized libraries, being
somewhat in the nature of himdreds to thousands. Besides
all this, the standard work of reference, the. technical text-
book, and the handbook of science or art, so far from
being cheapened, are rising in price.

The L.A. Conference is always a matter of importance,
because no matter how old and threadbare the subjects for
discussion may be, the annual meeting deals either directly
or indirectly with questions of the future, or reflects the
work of the past. The Glasgow G>nference was rather good
from both standpoints.



Online LibraryFrederick George AfflaloThe Literary year book → online text (page 65 of 83)