Frederick Newton Kneeland.

Drives in Northampton and vicinity online

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UNIV. OF MASSACtlUSETTS/AMHERST
LIBRARY



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DRIVES



IN



NORTHAMPTON



AND



VICINITY.



WITH MAPS.



By F. N. KNEELAND.



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. :

PRESS OF GAZETTE PRINTING CO.

1888.



Copyright by
F. N. KNEELAND.

1888.



y





^je^i^^^yi^e^ ^"^/^^^^^



INTRODUCTION.



Do you know that you live in the midst of one of the most
charming regions in this country ? Travellers unite in the opin-
ion that there can nowhere be found scenery more beautiful
than that around our city.

Jenny Lind, enraptured by its loveliness, lingered here many
months, and gave it the title, "Paradise of America." In "Pic-
turesque America" you may read — " The scenery along the river
if possible grows more charming as we advance. The hills as-
sume the name of mountains. We have reached Northampton,
in all respects one of the most beautiful villages in this or in
any other land, situated on the west side of the Connecticut,
on rising ground, about a mile from the river."

Beecher writes in "Norwood," — "Look with my eyes, good
reader, upon the town of Norwood, that, refusing to go down
upon the flat bottom-lands of the Connecticut, daintily perches
itself upon the irregular slopes west, and looks over upon that
transcendent valley from under its beautiful shade trees, and
you will say that no finer village glistens in the sunlight, or
nestles under arching elms."

In Kathrina, Holland speaks of Northampton, as

" Queen village of the meads,
Fronting the sunrise and in beauty throned.
With jeweled homes around her lifted brow
And coronal of ancient forest trees —
Northampton sits and rules her pleasant realm.
There where the saintly Edwards heralded
The terrors of the Lord, and men bowed low
Beneath the menace of his awful words ;
And there where Nature with a thousand tongues,
Tender and true, from vale and mountain top
And smiling streams, and landscapes piled afar,
Proclaimed a gentler gospel, I was born."

There is no uninteresting scenery around our city. Here, and

in the surrounding towns, are beautiful streets, shaded by fine

elms of great age, and pleasant river and meadow drives.

The views from Mts. Holyoke and Tom, for cultivated beauty,

cannot be surpassed, and within twelve miles of our city are

accessible hills, 500 feet higher than Mt. Holyoke, or as high as

the village of Bethlehem in the White Mountains.



IV



I have been surprised to learn how little many people here
know of the scenery so near at hand. I have taken old resi-
dents on short drives, within four miles of the center of our
city, and have been astonished to hear them say, " I have never
been here before, I did not know of any such place." This is
my reason for writing up these drives. Though not professing
to know more about the drives around us than some others, yet
being familiar with many of them, and somewhat of an enthu-
siast about the beauty and picturesqueness of our scenery, I
have tried to lay out plainly the paths in which I have found
much pleasure and profit, hoping that they may be of help to
others. Take your team, if you have one, if not, hire one, fol-
low the directions as here given, and see what there is around
you. Suppose that this year, instead of spending your money
at some well advertised place of resort, you spend the same
amount in driving or riding through Western Massachusetts.
You will see more beauty and perhaps as much grandeur, gain
as much in health, enjoy yourself better, and learn something
of your own surroundings.

The Maps. — The County map is made up from the surveys made
by the State at an expense of several hundred thousand dollars.
It has lately been revised for this work and is now very nearly
correct. I call attention to one error viz : — the words Mass. Cen-
tral R. R. ought not to have been printed against the extension
of the New Haven & Northampton R. R. in the towns of Whately
and Deerfleld.

On the Northampton and Easthampton map are figures against
the roads, they indicate the distance in rods from one road to an-
other. On this map are shown the meadow roads which afford
pleasant drives but are not written up in detail.



"But on and up, where Nature's heart
Beats strong amid the hills."

— Lord Houghton.




There are six leading
roads from the center
of N o r t h a m p t o n. Elm
Street leads west to Flor-
ence, turning to the right
from Main street at Smith College.
King Street leads northwest from
Main, between the Court House and
the First National Bank building, to
Hatfield, Whately, Greenfield, etc.
Bridge Street extends from Main
at the railroad crossing and leads northeast to
Hadley, Amherst, and Boston. Pleasant
Street leads from Main, directly opposite
King, southeast to South Hadley, via Hocka-
num Ferry. South Street leads from Main,
opposite the Mansion House, southeast to East-
ham p ton and Springfield. West Street leads
southwest to Loudville, Westhampton, Hunt-
ington, etc., turning to the left from Main street
at Smith College, and again to the left after a
few rods, at the top of the hill.

Besides those already named, there are cross
roads, a few miles out, which it is well to
know, as follows : — at Pine Grove School
House, Roberts Meadow, West Farms and
Kingsley's Bridge.



6

Wherever Mountain street is named, it re-
fers to the nearly straight road in the eastern
part of Williamsburg, shown plainly on the
County map, lying between Horse Mountain
and Beaver brook ; it is a little more than one
mile long. Though the name Mountain street
is applied to quite a district in eastern Wil-
liamsburg, I have used it only as above, and in
that connection shall refer to it often. The road
from the southern end of Mountain street, over
Horse Mountain to a pond in Hatiield, is used
very little.

Hospital Hill or Hospital grounds refer to the
State Lunatic Hospital, the Dickinson Hospital
not beiny; mentioned.



TO PINE GROVE SCHOOL HOUSE.

Drive through West street to the top of Hos-
pital Hill. A few rods after passing the gate
to the Hospital grounds the road divides ; bear
here to the left, then keep the direct road. Af-
ter passing the ice house and ascending the hill,
the road again divides ; bear here to the right,
and a drive of one-half mile brings you to Pine
Grove School House, a brick building on your
right where the roads cross. This is an impor-
tant point, because roads lead from it in several
directions, as you will see on the Nortliampton
and Easthampton map. The road from North-
ampton, on which you have come, continues to
Loudville, Westhampton, Huntington, etc.
The road to the right leads to Florence ; that
to the left divides after a few rods, the right
leading to Park Hill and the left to Easthamp-
ton. Two and three-quarter miles each way ;
no railroad crossing.



JVo. 3.

TO ROBERTS MEADOW.

Drive tlirough Elm street to Florence; pass
through Florence and cross either iron bridge.
To reach the upper bridge, turn to the left at
Cosmian Hall ; to reach the lower bridge, take
the road past the Congregational Church and
school house. If yon cross the upper bridge,
keep the straight road ; if you cross the lower
bridge, bear to the right as soon as you cross
the bridge, and you will soon enter the road
from the upper bridge. After that, bear to the
left, rejecting all roads leading to the right.
Passing over Roberts Hill j^ou cross the bridge
over Roberts Meadow brook at the foot of the
hill, drive tlirough the meadow, cross another
bridge, and you are at Roberts Meadow, which
consists of a few houses at the crossing of the
roads. Tlie road on which you have come con-
tinues to Westhampton and Chesterfield ; the
road to the right leads to Williamsburg ; that
to the left to West Farms. Roberts Meadow
is shown plainly on the Northampton and
Easthampton map, ]'ust northwest of Roberts
Hill, and on the County^ map northwest of Saw
Mill Hills, where the red dotted line begins.
Five miles each way ; no railroad crossing.



TO \A^EST FARMS.

West Farms is a small village scattered along
the road which leads soutlT from Roberts
Meadow for more than two miles. To reach
this place, drive to Roberts Meadow as in No.
2, then turn to the left. Or, drive to Pine Grove
School House as in No. 1, then keep the straight
road about two miles and turn to the right at the
first cross-road. The distance by way of Roberts
Meadow is seven miles ; by way of Pine Grove



8

School House, five and one-lialf miles. There is
one road which crosses this West Farms road,
about one-third of a mile north of the chapel.
The eastern section soon divides; the left branch,
well travelled, leads to Florence ; the other
branch, nearly straiglit, is grass grown, in poor
repair and difficult of passage with a top car-
riage, but is used some. It leads to Northamp-
ton over Hospital Hill and is a pleasant wood
road. The western section, after about a mile,
is impassable, having been discontinued, but
is a pleasant road for this distance, and picnic
parties sometimes avail themselves of it, No
railroad crossing.



Ko. 4.

TO KINGSLEY'S BRIDGE, LOUDVILLE.

Drive to Pine Grove School House as in No.
1, then keep the direct road, crossing but
one road (the West Farms road) ; about one
mile beyond this road you cross Kingsley's
Bridge, high above the river. The road on
which you have come continues to Huntington.
The road to the right leads to Westhampton
center, and the road to the left leads to Loud-
ville and Southampton. Plainly shown on the
Northampton and Easthampton map, in the
southwest corner of Northampton, the name S.
Kingsley being on the map near the briiige.
Shown also on the County map on the dotted
line of road from Northampton to Westhamp-
ton. Six miles each way ; no railroad crossing.



TO HATFIELD.

Drive through King street and keep the di-
rect road ; after crossing the high bridge over
the railroad, turn sharply to the right ; one
mile from this bridge, where the road divides,
bear to the right, and after crossing two rail-



9



roads keep tlie direct road to Hatfield. The
village is on the bank of the Connecticut river ;
the name Hatfield on the County map is at the
railroad station, two miles west of the village.
The road is shown on the County map by a
red dotted line, which begins and bears to the
right just above the bend in the Connecticut
river north of Northampton. In returning, at
the lower end of the street on which the church
is located, turn to the right, the straight road
will take you into the meadows. The change
in the roads at the high bridge over the railroad
is shown on the County map, but was not cor-
rected on the Northampton and Easthampton
map. Five miles each way ; four railroad cross-
ings each way.



JVo. 6.

TO WHATELY.

Drive as in No. 5, to where the road divides,
one mile beyond the railroad crossing ; here
keep the direct road and you will soon pass the
camp meeting grounds. After crossing two
roads in the next two miles the road divides ;
bear here to the left and then keep the direct
road to Whately. Shown on the County map
by a red dotted line beginning at the bend in
the Connecticut river, north of Northampton,
and extending due north. In returning, after
crossing the bridge at Westbrook, be sure and
take the Northampton road shown by the red
dotted line (guide board here). Eight and one-
half miles each way ; two railroad crossings
each way.



No. 7.

TO HADLEY.

Drive through Bridge street, cross the bridge
over the Connecticut river and keep the direct
road. The Central Mass. railroad track is par-
allel with this road and quite near it most of
the way, but does not cross it at any point.
Two and one-half miles each way.



10

No. S.

TO AMHERST.

Drive to Hadley as in No. 7, and keep the
direct road, crossing the railroad a few miles
beyond Hadley. Shown on the County map
by a red dotted line, beginning at the bridge
over the Connecticut river and passing through
the center of Hadley. Seven and one-quarter
miles each way.



No. 9.

TO SOUTH HADLEY via HOCKANUM.

Drive through Pleasant street and the mead-
ows to Hockanum ferry ; after crossing the
river, turn to the right, pass around the end of
the Mt. Holyoke range through the "Pass of
Thermopylje," and take the first road to the
right after passing the lane leading to the right,
on which is a house some distance from the
road ; then follow the direct road to South
Hadley. Shown on the County map by a red
dotted line. Six miles each way ; one railroad
crossing in Pleasant street.



JVo. 10.

TO SOUTH HADLEY via SMITHS FERRY.

Drive on South street until you cross the
bridge, which is only a short distance from
Main street ; then turn sharply to the left, pass
tiirough Maple street and continue the direct
road south, which is near the railroad and
crosses it at Mt. Tom station and again before
reaching Smiths Ferry. At Smiths Ferry sta-
tion turn to the left across the railroad, cross
the river by the ferry, then turn to the left, and
after crossing the brook, bear to the right to
South Hadley. Shown on the County map by
a red dotted line. Six miles each way.



11

This is a bad road for a liorse that is afraid
of the cars. You avoid much of the railroad
and ^et tiner views, but increase the distance
one and three-quarter miles by continuing on
South street, after crossing the bridge, until
you reach Fort street, which is the fourth stieet
leading to the left from South, after ascending
the second hill. Drive through Fort Street
and the meadows (rejecting any roads leading
to the left after descending the hill), nearly
two miles, until you reach the house where the
road divides ; bear hereto the left and you will
soon cross Manhan river and the railroad ; at
the next road, turn to the left and then keep
the direct road to Smiths Ferry, crossing the
railroad at Mt. Tom Station. Shown on the
Northampton and Easthampton map. Seven
and three-quarter miles each way.



No. 11.

TO EASTHAMPTON.
Drive through South street ; at the end of
South street, which is one mile from North-
ampton center, the road divides ; here take the
left or nearly straight road, which you will
keep, crossing the railroad once (take no roads
leading to the left) to Easthampton. Shown
plainly on the Northampton and Easthampton
map, and on the County map by a red dotted
line. Four and one-quarter miles each way.



No. 12.

TO HAYDENVILLE.

Drive to Florence ; at Cosmian Hall bear to
the right and then keep the direct road until
you have crossed the railroad track. About
one- third of a mile beyond, where the road di-
vides (see "M. Warner" on the Northampton
and Easthampton map), turn to the right and
then keep the direct road over the hill, nearly
three miles, to Haydenville. Six miles each way.



n



TO HAYDENVILLE via LEEDS.

Drive as in No. 12, to M. Warner's; turn
to the left and go over the hill down into
Leeds, four miles from Northampton ; cross the
river and take the fiist road to the right. It is
a beautiful drive of two miles along the river
bank, coming into Haydenville on the west side
of the river. Six miles each way. Or, go to
Haydenville by No. 13 and return by No 12.
Twelve miles. Cross the railroad twice each
way.



No. 14.

TO WILLIAMSBURG.

Drive to Haydenville as in No. 12, then
keep the direct road past the Brass Works.
When you reach the Williamsburg depot bear
to the left, keeping the most travelled road.
Eight miles each way ; cross the railroad twice
each way.



Ko. in.
TO WILLIAMSBURG, WITHOUT CROSS-
ING THE RAILROAD.

Drive to P^lorence ; at Cosmian Hall bear to
the left and cross the iron bridge ; about a mile
from the bridge the road divides ; bear here to
the right and after driving two-thirds of a mile
you will pass over a high bridge ; then bear to
the left and drive through Leeds street. At
the iron water tank at the end of the street,
turn to the left, cross the river, keep the direct
road up the hill and a drive of four and one-
half miles brings you into Williamsburg.
This is a beautiful drive, a half mile longer
than the common road, No. 14, but it is a bet-
ter road with less travel and away from the
railroad. Eight and one-half miles each way.

Or, go to Williamsburg by No. 15 and re-
turn by No. 14. Sixteen and one-half miles.



]3

No. 16.

FIFTEEN and ONE-HALF MILES DRIVE.
Drive to Easihampton; at tlie stone library
building bear to the left, then keep the direct
road, passing, after crossing the railroad, one
road to the right and bearing to the let't at next
division in the road ; now keep this road, pass-
ing one road to the left and turning at the next
road to the left and very soon again to the left
at the brook and old mill. The road now follows
by the side of Broad brook ; keep this road
one and three-qnarter miles, passing one road
to the left and turning to the left at the next road
(which is the road that conies over the moun-
tain from Holyoke), to Easthampton and
thence to Northampton. Shown on the North-
ampton and Easthampton map.



JVo. 17.

FOURTEEN AND ONE-HALF MILES
DRIVE.

Drive as in No. 16, to the mountain
road from Holyoke, and instead of turning to
the left to Easthampton, cross the mountain
road, turning to the right at the school house
on the mountain road. Follow this road a lit-
tle more than two miles, passing two roads to
the left (not including the road a few rods from
the school house), and turning to the left at
the next road. After crossing the railroad and
Manhan river, at the first division in the road,
near a large house, bear to the right to North-
ampton, through the meadows. Show^n on
the Northampton and Easthampton map.



No. IS.

TO THE SOUTHERN END OF MT. TOM
RANGE.

Drive to Easthampton, take the second street
to the left after passing the stone library build-
ing (Village street) ; follow this street, and af-
ter crossing the railroad and passing one street
to the right, bear to the right at the next divi-



14

sion (Mountain street). Drive nearly three
miles to a house on the right side of the road,
at about the highest part of the road over the
range to Holyoke. For this house see "J.
McMahon" on the Northampton and East-
hampton map, at the lower end of the Mt. Tom
range. From this point w^alk up to the sum-
mit. It is not difficult to climb, and when
you reach it you stand on an elevation 1,214
feet above the sea level, and 260 feet higher
than Mt. Holyoke. Walk along on this ridge,
which on the northwest side is nearly perpen-
dicular, for a quarter of a mile, and see if
there is not grandeur as well as beauty here.
The view is extensive in all directions, including

Hadley, Granby, Suffield,

Amherst, South Hadley, Westfield,

Hatfield, Ludlow, ' Hartford, Ct.,

Montague, Palmer, Blandford,

Shutesbury, North Wilbraham, Middlefield,

Pelhain, Longmeadow, Goshen,

WachusettMt., Enfield, Greylock Mt.,

Belchertowu, Roc-kville, Ct., Mt. Anthony,

Mt. Monadnock, Tolland, Ct., Haystack,

Mt. Toby, Holyoke, "Williamsburg,

Mt. Sugarloaf, Meriden Hills, Ct., Haydenville,

Mt. Grace, Southampton, Shelbunie,

Northampton, Chicopee, Easthamjjton,

Hardwick, Springfield, Westhampton,

Brookfield, West Springfield,

And a number of other towns in Connecticut,
which it is difficult to locate or name. J t is
probable that a road will soon be built to the
summit. Seven and one-half miles each way.
A little nearer way to reach this point is to
drive on South street to Fort street ; then drive
through Fort street and the meadows about
two miles, until you reach a house where the
road divides, turn here to the left and you
will soon cross Manlian river and the railroad.
(Described thus far in No. 10.) At the next
road turn to the right, now keep the direct
road which winds along at the foot of the Mt.
Tom range (take no road to the right) ; turn to
the left at the first road, keep to the left, and
you soon begin to ascend ; stop at J. McMa-
hon' s at the end of theMt. Tom range, as above.
Six and one-half miles each way.



15



TO AMHERST— RETURN via PLAIN-
VILLE.

Drive to Amherst as in No. 8. In return-
ing, turn to the west at the Amherst house
into Amity street, then keep the direct road.
After crossino- tlie Phiinvilleroad (if you wish to
go to Plainville center, turn to the riglit at tliis
road) and passing the cemetery on your right,
take the right hand road and pass over the
slope of Mt. Warner ; then take the first road
to the left, or go on to the Connecticut river
and turn to the left ; either road will take you
to Northampton via Hadley. Fifteen miles ;
one railroad crossing each way.



No. iO.

TO SPRINGFIELD.

Drive on South street until you cross the
South street bridge, turn here sharply to the
left as in No. 10, then keep the direct road
as in No. 10, to Smiths Ferry, and so on
to the south, passing to the right of Holyoke
center, through Ashleyville and West Spring-
field, crossing the Connecticut river at Spring-
held. A bad road for a horse that is afraid of
the cars. By making the drive one and three-
quarter miles longer, you avoid much of the
railroad (see No. 10). Shown plainly on the
County map by a red dotted line. Seventeen
miles each way.



No. 21.

TO HOLYOKE.

Drive as in No. 20, through Smiths Ferry,
keeping the direct road south and turning
to the left at either the first or second road.
These two roads are near each other and nearly
four miles below Smiths Ferry. Shown plainly



16

on the County map by a red dotted line. A
bad road for a horse that is afraid of the cars.
By making the drive one and three quarter
miles longer, you avoid much of the railroad
(see remarks in No. 10). Eight miles each way.
Or, drive to the southern end of Mt. Tom
range as in No. 18, then on over the range by
the direct road, taking no roads to the right.



TO WESTHAMPTON.

Drive to Kingsley's bridge as in No. 4.
After crossing this bridge turn to the right,
keep this road two-thirds of a mile to where it
divides and bear to the left or the most trav-
elled road. In two-thirds of a mile more the
road divides again ; bear to the left and then
follow the straight road to Westhampton.
Shown plainly on the County map by a red
dotted line. Nine miles each way ; no railroad.



Ko. 23.

TO WESTHAMPTON via ROBERTS
MEADO^A/'.

Drive to Roberts Meadow as in No. 2,
keep the straight road, turning neither to the
right or left. After passing the reservoir on
your right, take the first road to your left (a
few rods from a small bridge on the right hand
road), then keep this road nearly three niiles to
Westhampton center. Shown plainly on the
County nuip by a red dotted line from Roberts
Meadow. Nine miles each way ; no lailroad.



J>'o. 24.

EIGHTEEN MILES DRIVE.

Drive to Westhampton by No. 23, and return
by way of Kingsley's bridge, the reverse of
No. 22. This whole line is shown on the
County map by a red dotted line. No railroad.



17

JSo. 24 1-2.

SIX MILES DRIVE.

Drive on the Easthampton road (No. 11),
until you have crossed the railroad ; then tnke
the first left hand road, cross the railroad again
and turn into the first left hand road ; and at
the next division of the road, where stands a
large house, turn to the left to Northampton
through the meadows.



NINE MILES DRIVE.

Drive to Easthampton as in No. 11 ; re-
turn on same road about one-half mile until
you reach a wooden school house ; turn here to
the left, go on about one mile and turn to the
right at a road which is the third road to the
right after you pass the school house ; or, go
one-third of a mile further, to Pine Grove
school house and then turn to the right. Either
road will take you home over Hospital Hill or
through South street. Shown on the North-
ampton and Easthampton map. Several rail-
road crossings.



No. 2


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Online LibraryFrederick Newton KneelandDrives in Northampton and vicinity → online text (page 1 of 5)