Frederick Newton Kneeland.

Drives in Northampton and vicinity online

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turn to the right. Keep tliis road three and
one-half miles, and in this distance you pass
over a high hill on Nash street, on which are sev-
eral houses. After you descend this hill, keep
the direct road (taking no roads to the right), un-
til you come to a house on your left. This is
about as far as you can safely drive. Leave
your team here, and walk on the road a short
distance, when you will see "High Ridge,"
which is the farthest high point you can see,
nearly in front of you but a little to the left
(left side of the road). If you leave the road
on the left side, at about the point where you
see the ruins of an old house, you will find the
ascent quite gradual. There is no path to the
summit. The whole country is open pasture,
so that it is not important where you leave the
road, but if you leave it as stated above, you.
will find the ascent more gradual than if you
go farther along the road and nearer to the
Ridge. The walk froui where you leave your
team to the summit is about one and one-half



35

miles. Aside from More's hill in the town of
Goshen. High Ridge is the highest land in
Hampshire County. Its elevation is 1,484 feet,
530 feet feet higher than Mt. Holyoke, or as
high as the highest point of Bethlehem street
in the village of Bethlehem, in the White
Mountains. It is not a difficult climb, and
ought to be visited by more people than it is.
The view is very extensive in all directions.

Shown plainly on the County map in the
northern part of Williamsburg. Twelve and
one-half miles each way. Railroad crossings.



SEVENTEEN MILES DRIVE.

Drive as in No. 69, to the Williamsburg
depot, turn here to the right and after driving
a little more than a mile, take the first road to
the right. Drive on this road two miles and
turn to the right at the first road, which is
Mountain street. Pass through Mountain
street and North Farms to Northampton.
Railroad crossings.



Ho. 71.

T^VENTY MILES DRIVE.

Drive as in No. 69, until you have passed
through Nash street. When you descend the
hill beyond the houses, turn to the right at
the first road, and after going one mile you
reach West Whately, shown on the County
map where the road divides, the left descend-
ing, the right ascending. Turn to the right,
and after driving about half a mile, you pass
two roads on your left very near together. At
the third road to the left, in the hollow where
there is a guide board (the inscription on which
is illegible), turn to the left. This will take
yoQ into Mountain street, thence home through
North Farms. The road described here from



West Wliately to Mountain street, is a part of
the road from Conway to Northampton, and is
shown by a red dotted line on the County map.
This is a very beautiful drive of twenty miles.



Railroad crossings.



No. 73.

TWENTY MILES DRIVE.

Drive as in No. 71, until you reach West
Whately where the road divides ; here take the
left, or descending road, which follows the
brook. After driving about one mile you en-
ter another road (if you turn to the right here
and go up the hill you will come into Mountain
street, as in No. 71). Turn to the left, and af-
ter a short distance the road divides ; turn here
to the right, cross the brook and then bear to
the left (the road up the hill, grass grown, goes
over Chestnut mountain), and ^^ou will find a
beautiful drive down the brook to Westbrook.
After descending the hill by the mill, turn to
the right to Northampton. When you cross
the bridge at the foot of the hill, be sure to take
the road to Northampton (see guide board), af-
ter this the road is very direct. Railroad cross-
ings.



No. 73.

NINE MILES DRIVE.

Drive through King street ; after crossing the
railroad at the old Catholic Ciiurch and going
about three-quarters of a mile, just before
reaching a slight elevation in the road, turn to
the right. Cross the railroad, and after driv-
ing one mile down the Conn, river bank, you
come into Bridge street, a few rods from the
bridge over the Conn, river (you can turn to
the right liere down Bridge street and make the



B7

drive three and one-half miles long). Turn to
the left here, cross the bridge, and after a few
rods bear to the right. At the foot of Middle
street in Hadley, where the road crosses, turn
to the right (road to South Hadley) and keep
the direct road to Hockanum ; turn to the right
at the hotel and cross the ferry to North-
ampton.



No. 74.

TO MT. HOLYOKE.

Drive through Pleasant street to Hockanum
Ferry, cross the ferry and turn to the left ;
a short drive will bring you to the mountain
road. Two and one half miles each way.

Or, drive through Bridge street, cross the
bridge over the Connecticut river and take the
first road leading to the right. Keep this road
to the foot of Middle street in Hadley, where
the road crosses ; turn here to the right (road
to South Hadley), then keep the direct road,
and at Hockanum you will see the road to the
mountain, s Five and one-half miles each way.
Go one way and return the other — eight miles.
Railroad crossings in Pleasant and Bridge
streets. From the Prospect House can be seen
mountains in four States, also forty towns.
See advertisement.



IiTo. 74 IS.

TO MT. NONOTUCK.

Drive to Mt. Tom station as in No. 10. Prom
here there is a very good road to within a few
rods of the summit of Mt. Nonotuck, where
there is a shed at which you can leave your
team. Railroad crossings, and the road is near
the railroad for half a mile. Two and one-half
miles each way.
5



TO NORTH HADLEY.

Drive to Hadley as in No. 7. On reaching
Hadley street, turn to the left ; at the upper
end of tlie street you will have to bear to the
right. Now keep the direct road which bears to
the left, along the bank of the Conn, river to
North Hadley. Plainly shown oh the County
map by a red dotted line. Two railroad cross-
ings each way, A beautiful drive of six miles
each way.

Or, you can drive as above, and just before
reaching North Hadley, turn to the left, cross
the feriy to Hatfield, then turn to the left to
Northampton. Twelve miles. Several rail-
road crossings.



No. 7fi.

AROUND MT. WARNER.

Drive to North Hadley as in No. 75. Take
the first right hand road after passing through
North Hadley ; turn again to the right after
going a few rods, then keep the direct road to
Plainville. Turn here to the right, pass over
the slope of Mt. Warner, through Hadley to
Northampton. Fifteen miles.

Or, at Plainville, keep the straight road
south, and any of the roads turning to the
right will take you through Hadley to North-
ampton. Hadley, North Hadley, Plainville
and Mt. Warner are all plainly and correctly
shown on the County map in the town of Had-
ley. Several railroad crossings.



No. 77.

TO SUNDERLAND.
Drive to North Hadley, as in No. 75, then
keep the direct road north. Take no roads to
the right, but keep the direct road along the
river bank to Sunderland. Shown on the
County map by a red dotted line. Twelve
miles each way. Two railroad crossings each
way.



39

Ko. 78.

TWENTY-FIVE MILES DRIVE.

Drive to Sunderland, as in No. 77 ; here turn
to the left and cross the bridge over the Conn,
river ; then take the first road to the left and
keep the direct road, passing through East
Whately, ^N orth Hatfield and Hatfield to North-
ampton. Several railroad crossings.



No. 70.

TO SOUTH DEERFIELD.

Drive to Hatfield church (No. 5), then keep
the direct road north, as shown by the red dot-
ted line on the County map, passing through
North Hatfield and East Whately and at Sugar-
loaf mountain bearing to the left to South
Deerfield. Thirteen miles each way. Several
railroad crossings.



No. so.
TO SOUTH DEERFIELD.

Drive to Whately as in No. 6. Take the sec-
ond road to the right after passing the church,
and then keep the direct road to South Deer-
field. Shown on the County map by a red dot-
ted line. Twelve miles each way. Two rail-
road crossings each way.

Or, drive as in No. 5, to where the road di-
vides, one mile beyond the railroad crossing ;
here keep the direct road, passing the camp
meeting grounds. After crossing two roads in
the next two miles the road divides ; here bear
to the right, keeping the direct road north
(line of telephone) past North Hatfield station
to South Deerfield. Twelve miles each way.
Several railroad crossings.



40

Ko. 81.

TO SOUTH DEERFIELD.

Drive to Sunderland as in No. 77, cross the
bridge over the Conn, river, then keep the di-
rect road, which bears a little to the right, pass-
ing close to the sandstone cliffs of Sugar-loaf
mountain. Shown on the County map by a
red dotted line. Thirteen miles each way.
Two railroad crossings each way.



No. 82.

TO SUGAR-LOAF MOUNTAIN.

Drive to South Deerfield, by either No. 79 or
80. The road to the mountain leads out of the
village street to the east, as shown on the
County map. Thirteen miles each way. Sev-
eral railroad crossings.

If you are a good driver you can drive to the
summit. From most of the mountains and
hills in this vicinity we look across the Conn,
valley, but Sugar-loaf mountain is located in
the center of the valley, and the view of the
river and meadows down the valley to the south
is very fine.



JVo. 83.

TO WHATELY GLEN.

Drive to Whately as in No. 6, then keej) the
direct road north (take no roads to the right).
After driving a little more than one mile, you
cross a bridge, and turning to the left ascend
quite a hill. The house at the top of this hill
is the residence of Chas. S. Sanderson, who
owns the Glen. Here put up your team, as
you cannot drive into the Glen, Ten miles
each way. Several railroad crossings. See
advertisement.



41

JVo. S4.

THIRTEEN AND ONE-HALF MILES
DRIVE.

Drive to Haydenville as in No, 13 ; turn to
the east at the Congregational Church, cross
the railroad, drive about two miles to where
the road divides, and bear to the right (the left
will take you through Mountain street). Pass
over the hill and through North Farms to
Northampton. A very beautiful drive of thir-
teen and one-half miles. Several railroad cross-
ings.



Ko. 85.

TO CONWAY.

Drive to North Farms as in No. 50 ; then
keep on over the hill, and at the foot of the
hill where the road divides, bear to the right.
Pass through Mountain street, cross one road
at the upper end of Mountain street, and turn
to the left at the next road, which will take you
to West Whately. Cross the river here over
the first bridge and turn to the left ; the road
soon bears to the right, passing between a
school house and a dwelling house, and then is
quite direct. Shown on the County map from
Mountain street by a red dotted line. Return
the same way. Fourteen miles each way.
Several railroad crossings.



No. 86.

TO CONWAY AND RETURN BY
WHATELY GLEN.

Drive to Conway as in No. 85. At the center
of the town turn to the east near the Congre-
gational parsonage (stage road to South Deer-
field). After driving three-quarters of a mile,
take the first road to the right, then keep the



42



direct road, bearing to tlie left where any roads
lead to the right. A drive of about three miles
will bring yon to Whately Glen ; from here the
road to Northampton is described in No, 83.
A very fine drive, which gives you the oppor-
tunity of stopping at Whately Glen. Twenty-
eight miles. Several railroad crossings.



Ko. 87.

TO CONWAY— RETURN BY SOUTH
DEERFIELD.

Drive to Conway as in No. 85. Turn to the
east at the Congregational parsonage, and keep
the direct road, bearing to the right at the sec-
ond road to the right after leaving Conway cen-
ter (taking no roads to the left), then keep the
direct road as shown by a red dotted line on
the County map to South Deerfield, thence to
Whately center and Northampton.

Or, at South Deerfield, take the road that
leads close to Sugar-loaf mountain (not the
road to the summit) and a few rods before
reaching the Conn, river, turn to the right and
come home through East Whately and Hat-
field. Or, at Sugar-loaf mountain, cross the
Conn, river and come home through Sunder-
land and Hadley (No. 77). Thirty miles.
Several railroad crossings.



Ko. 88.

TO ASHFIELD.

Drive to Williamsburg (No. 14 or 16) ; pass
the hotels and cross the first bridge, then cross
the street and take the road directly ahead
(North street), which leads up the hill and fol-
lows the left bank of the brook, as shown on
the County map. Keep the direct road ; after
going two and one-half miles and crossing a
small brook, take the second left hand road.



43



then after one mile and a half where the road
divides, bear to the left and in about three-
quarters of a mile farther, you come into
another road ; bear here to the right and after
a short distance turn sharply to the left down
a little descent ; cross the brook and ascend a
long hill. The road from here is unmistakable,
passing through South Ashfield to Ashfield.
The whole road from Williamsburg to Ashfield
is shown on the County map by a red dotted
line. If you go to and return from Williams-
burg by No. 15, there are no railroad crossings
on this drive. Eighteen miles each way.



TO ASHFIELD— RETURN via CONWAY.

Drive to Ashfield as in No. 88, and return the
same way as far as South Ashfield. Here bear
to the left and follow the bank of South river,
as shown by a red dotted line on the County
map, to Conway. A good road, of easy de-
scent all of the way, and a very beautiful
drive. From Conway you can come to North-
ampton by Nos. 85, 86 or 87 ; Nos. 85 and 87
are shown by red dotted lines on the County
map. If you return by No. 85, the distance is
thirtj^-eight miles ; by No. 86, thirty-eight
miles ; and by No. 87, forty miles. Several
railroad crossino-s.



JVo. 90.

TO GREENFIELD.

Drive to South Deerfield as in No. 79, or 80 ;
then keep the direct road north, which follows
the Connecticut River Railroad track, and pass-
es through Deerfield. A mile beyond Deerfield,
after passing under the railroad, turn to the
left and cross the Deerfield river, then turn to



I

the left and a short drive takes yon into Green-
field. The line of this drive is shown on the
County map by a red dotted line. Twenty
miles each way. Several railroad crossings.



No. 9J.

TWENTY-SEVEN MILES DRIVE.

Drive to South Deerfield (No. 79 or 80), then
continue north on the road parallel with the
Conn. River Railroad track, and Just before the
road crosses the railroad track, turn to the
right. Keep the direct road and you will come
into a road on the bank of the Conn, river ; fol-
low this road down to the Sunderland bridge,
thence to Northampton by No. 79 or 81.
Shown on the County map in the town of Deer-
field. Several railroad crossings.



JVo. 92.

THIRTY-NINE MILES DRIVE.

Drive to South Deerfield^ and continue north
to Deerfield center, then keep^^th^direct road
north. Pass under the railroad near~the^ Deer-
field river and then keep the direct road (take
no roads to the left), which will bear around to
the right, and after two miles you will reach
the Conn, river ; follow this road down the
bank of the river to Sunderland bridge, Shown on
the County map in the town of Deerfield.
Several railroad crossino-s.



Ko. 93.

NINETEEN MILES DRIVE.

Drive to Williamsburg depot and turn to the
right as in No. 69 ; after driving about one
mile you will cross one road and at the next
road (Nash street), turn to the left. This road
will take you to Williamsburg center, thence
to Northampton by either South street, or
South Main street. Several railroad crossings.



45

iVo. 94.

TO BELCHERTOWN.

Drive through Bridge street, cross the bridge
over the Connecticut river, and witliin a few
rods, take the first road to the right, which is
the "Bay road" as described between Nos. 39
and 40, and shown on the County map by a red
dotted line. Follow this road to Belchertown,
and return the same way. Fourteen miles
each way. Several railroad crossings.



JVo. 95.

TO BELCHERTOWN— RETURN via
GRANBY.

Drive to Belchertown (No. 94), thence to
Granby and South Hadley, thence to North-
ampton (No. 9). Shown on the County map.
Distance, twenty-nine miles. Several railroad
crossing-s.



Ko. 96.

TO BELCHERTOWN— RETURN via

MANASSAS GAP.

Drive to Belchertown (No. 94). In return-
ing, turn to the west at the northern end of the
Village Green into Walnut street. You will
soon cross the railroad track, and after driving
three quarters of a mile farther you enter a
road near the Town Farm ; here bear to the
left ; after a few rods 3^ou will pass one road to
the right, now keep the direct road (take no
roads to the left), pass two roads to the right
in the next three miles, and turn to the right at
the next road (about seven miles from Belcher-
town center). This road leads througli the
Notch in the Mt. Holyoke range. After de-
scending the slope of the mountain, turn to
the left into the "Bay road" to Northampton.
Thirty miles. Several railroad crossings.
6



JVo. 97.

PETTICOAT HILL.

Drive to Williamsburg (Nos. 14 or 15) ; here
turn to the left at the Williams House and take
the road up the hill until you come to the first
left hand road where are two houses. The
view from here is one of ihe finest in Hamp-
shire County. Return the same way. If you
go to and return from Williamsburg by No.
15, there are no railroad crossings on this drive.
Nineteen miles.



MT. ESTHER.

Drive to the point where the road divides
near the bridge at the north side of Chestnut
mountain (see remarks between Nos. 56 and
67). If you come by the way of Mountain
street, take the first road to the left ; if you
come by the way of Westbrook, after crossing
the bridge north of Chestnut mountain, take
the straight road up the hill, not much trav-
elled, which is the same road in either case.
At the next point of division, turn to the left,
then keep the direct road which is travelled but
little, and after a very hilly drive you will
come to a house and fine farm on the highest
part of the road, partly in Whately and partly
in Conway. A path leads west from here
to the summit of Mt. Esther, which is 995
feet high. The Signal Service placed a flag
on this summit a few years since. The sum-
mit is open, allowing fine views. The road on
which you have come continues to Conway.
This is a hard road with steep ascents. Shown
on the County map in the northern part of
Whately. Twenty-two miles. Several railroad
crossings.



47

TO CHESTERFIELD AND WORTH-
INGTON.;

Drive to Roberts Meadow, then keep the di-
rect road as in No. 95. After driving about
four miles beyond Roberts Meadow, you will
pass over the highest part of the road near
Kid,d' s Lookout. After descending a long hill
in Chesterfield, passing one road to the right,
and one to the left, you cross a river and turn
to the I'ight at the first road, to Chesterfield
center. At Chesterfield center, take the road
to the west, passing through West Chesterfield
to Worthington, as shown on the County map
by a red dotted line. To Chesterfield, twelve
and one-half miles. To Worthington, eighteen
and one-half miles. No railroad crossings.



JVo. lOO.

TO CHESTERFIELD via WILLIAMS-
BURG.

Drive to Williamsburg as in No. 14 or 15 ;
at Williamsburg turn to the left at the Williams
House, and keep the most travelled road which
bears to the right. You will soon cross the
river, and keep the direct road, which, after
passing one road to the right, soon divides ;
bear here to the left and soon cross the river
again ; now keep the direct road to Chesterfield
center as shown on the County map by a red
dotted line. If you go to and return from
Williamsburg by No. 15, there are no railroad
crossings on this road. Fourteen miles each
way.



TWENTY-SIX AND ONE-HALF MILES
DRIVE.

Drive to Chesterfield by No. 100, and re-
turn by No. 99, both plainly shown on the
County map by a red dotted line.



48



No. 102.

TO GOSHEN and CUMMINGTON
Drive to Williamsburg as in No. 14 or 15 ; at
Williamsburg, turn to the left and continue as
in No. 100, until you have crossed the river
and passed one road to the right. Where the
road divides, bear to the right, then keep the
direct road to Goshen, passing through Sears-
ville. Shown on the County map by a red dot-
ted line. Twelve and one-half miles each way.
After passing the church in Goshen, turn to
the left at the first road ; keeping now the di-
rect road, which passes through Swift River
village, and is shown on the County map by a
red dotted line to Cummington. Eighteen
miles each way. No railroad crossings beyond
Williamsburg.



No. 103.

THIRTEEN MILES DRIVE.
Drive as in No. 5, to where the road divides,
one mile beyond the railroad crossing; here
keep the direct road, and you will soon pass
the camp-meeting grounds. After crossing two
roads in the next two miles, the road divides ;
bear here to the left. Drive nearly one and
one-half miles and take the first road to the
left (do not cross the river, road turns at Cham-
pion Dickinson's place), continue on this road
two miles, and as you enter another road, turn
to the left, then keep the direct road and you
will come into the road from Northampton to
Whately, two miles above the camp meeting-
grounds ; turn to the right to Noi'thampton.
Two railroad crossings each way.



No. 104.

SIXTEEN MILES DRIVE.

Drive as in No. 103, to Champion Dickinson's
place, and turn to the left as in same number.
Drive on this road two miles, and as you enter



49

another road turn to the right, you will climb
quite a hill, pass one grass grown road to the
right (the Chestnut mountain road), and after
driving about one-third of a mile farther, turn
to the left into Mountain street. Pass through
Mountain street, bear to the left, go over the
hill and through North Farms to Northampton.
Three railroad crossings.



JSo. 105.

COLE'S MEADOW.

Drive as in No. 5, to where the road divides
one mile beyond the railroad crossing ; here
turn sharp to the left into a road little travelled,
skirting the woods, but shown plainly on the
Northampton and Easthampton map, forming
the western boundary of the camp-meeting
grounds. Keep this road, which after one and
one-half miles, bears to the right and comes
into the road from Northampton to AVhately,
one-half mile north of the camp-meeting
grounds, turn here to the right to Northamp-
ton. Seven miles. Several railroad crossings



Ko. 106.

TO GOODELL'S SEED FARM.

Drive on Amherst road (No. 8) to the rail-
road crossing beyond Hadley, do not cross the
railroad, but bear to the right. At the next
crossing of roads turn to the right, and at the
next crossing, just after crossing a stream, turn
to the left and keep this road to South Am-
herst. As you enter the Main street at South
Amherst, drive around the northern end of the
village green and turn to the east, at the road
by the Town Farm. Keep this road, cross two
railroads and one carriage road, and at the next
junction of roads you come to the Farm. Re-
turn the same way. Twenty miles.



50



Or, in returning, at Sonth Amherst, or at
any of the roads between South Amherst and
Hadley, you can turn to the left and drive to
the "Bay road" (No. 40), and turn to the
right to Northampton. Several railroad cross-
ings.



JVo. 107.

TO HUNTINGTON.

Drive to Kingsley's bridge (No. 4), cross this
bridge and keep the direct road up the hill.
A drive of nearly five miles will bring you to
Norwich Hill. Just before reaching the church
on Norwich Hill, turn to the left and keep the
direct road, which will take you down into the
valley ; cross the VVestfield river at Norwich
bridge and turn to the left. The road follows
down the bank of the river to Huntington.
Eighteen miles each way. No railroad cross-
ings.



ASHFIELD, CUMMINGTON, WORTH-
INGTON, NORWICH.

Drive to Ashfield (No. 88). At Ashfield
center turn to the south, nearly opposite the
hotel, then take the second road to the left ;
you will soon cross a road and turn to the right
at the next I'oad and to the right again very
soon (straight road would take you to Goshen).
Now keep the direct road several miles, pass-
ing four roads to the left and bearing to the
left at the hftli, in the edge of the town of
Plainfield, where are several houses. Keep
the direct road, passing two roads to the right
and bearing to the right at the next division in
the road and go down a long hill into Cuni-
mington village. At Cummington village turn
out of the Main street, opposite the river, keep


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Online LibraryFrederick Newton KneelandDrives in Northampton and vicinity → online text (page 3 of 5)