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Frederick Phisterer.

New York in the war of the rebellion, 1861 to 1865 (Volume 5) online

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NEBRASKA.
Non-prisoners. . . .
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Total Nebraska


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Non-prisoners. . . .
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Total Nevada.

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GENERAL AND GENERAL
STAFF OFFICERS, U. S.
VOLUNTEERS.
Non-prisoners
Prisoners


Total general and gen-
eral staff officers,
U. S. Volunteers. . .


U. S. COLORED TROOPS.
Non-prisoners
Prisoners


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MISCELLANEOUS U. S. VOL-
UNTEERS (.BRIGADE B'DS,
ETC.).
Non-prisoners
Prisoners


Total miscellaneous
U. S. Volunteers. . .


REGULAR ARMY.*
Non-prisoners
Prisoners.


Total Regular Army. .


RECAPITULATION.
Total non-prisoners
Total prisoners


Grand aggregate


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449 2



STATISTICAL EXHIBIT



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT

OF THE NUMBER OF MEN FURNISHED AND OF THE DEATHS IN THE UNITED STATES

ARMY DURING THE LATE WAR.



STATES, TERRITORIES, ETC.


MEN- FURNISHED.


Aggre-
gate
number
of
deaths.


White
troops.


Sailors
and
marines.


Colored
troops.


In-
dians.


Total.


Alabama .


2 576








2.576
8,289
15,725
4,903
55.864
206

12 , 284
16,534
I , 290


345
1,713
573
323
5.354
6
882
290

215

34.834
26,672
13,001

2 ,630

10,774
945
9.398
2.982
13.942
14,753
2.584
78
13.885
239
33
4.882
5.754
277
46,534
360
35,475
45
33,183
1,321
6,777
141
5.224
42

22

4.017
12,301
1,018
t36.847
1,672
106
552
243
239
232
5.798


Arkansas










California










Colorado










Connecticut


51.937
206
11,236
11,912


2,163


1,764




Dakota


Delaware


94
1.353


954
3,269




District of Columbia


Florida. . . .


Georgia










Illinois. . . .


255.057
193.748

75,797
18 069


2 , 224

1,078

5


1,811
1,537
440




259,092
196.363
76,242
20, 149

75,760

5.224

70, 107
46,638
146.730

87.364

24 ,020
545
109, in
3.157
I ,080
33,937
76.814
6,561
448,850
3,156
3 13 . 180
1,810
337,936
23,236
31 ,092
1.965
33,288


Indiana


Iowa


Kansas


Kentucky.


51,743
5,224
64.973
33.995

122 . 781
85.479
23.913

545
100,616
3,157


314


23,703




Louisiana


Maine


5,030
3.925
19,983
498
3


104

8,718
3 .966
1.387
104




Maryland


Massachusetts


Michigan


Minnesota


Mississippi




151


8,344




Nebraska


Nevada








New Hampshire


32,930
67 ,500
6,561
409 , 561
3.156
304.814


882
8,129


125
1,185




New Jersey


New Mexico


New York


35.164


4,125




North Carolina


Ohio


3,274


5.092




Oregon


Pennsylvania
Rhode Island


315,017
19.521


14.307
1,878


8,612
1,837




Tennessee


Texas










Vermont


32,549


619


120




Virginia


Washington


964

31,872
91 ,029








964
32,068
91.327
3.530
*99,337




133


196
165


3.530


Wisconsin


Indian Nations


Colored Troops






_ _


Veteran Reserve Corps . . . .










U. S. Veteran Volunteers (Hancock's Corps)




































General and general staff officers, U S. Vols. . . .












Miscellaneous U.S. Volunteers (brigade bands, etc.)


































2,494,592


101 , 207


178,975


3.530


2,778,304


359.528





* Number not credited upon the quotas of any State.

f Includes losses in all colored organizations excepting three regiments from Massachusetts.

EXPLANATORY NOTES.

With the exception of three Massachusetts regiments (organized and officered exclusively by the State
authorities) whose casualties are included with those of the white troops from that State, all losses in the i 78 , 975
colored troops are reported separately, irrespective of any credits allowed upon the quotas of the States. The
deaths in the excepted regiments aggregated 574.

In all other cases the figures in the column of deaths represent only such as occurred among the white troops
and Indians, Information relative to the number of deaths in the Navy and Marine Corps belongs to the
Navy Department.

The colored soldiers organized under the direct authority of the General Government and not credited to
any State were recruited as follows:

In Alabama, 4,969; Arkansas, 5,526; Colorado, 95; Florida, 1,044; Georgia, 3,486; Louisiana, 24,052; Mis-
sissippi, 17,869; North Carolina, 5,035; South Carolina, 5,462; Tennessee, 20,133; Texas, 47; Virginia, 5.723.

There were also 5,896 negro soldiers enlisted at large or whose credits are not specifically expressed by the
records.

Of the number of colored troops credited to the States. 5,052 were obtained, under the provisions of section
3, act of Congress approved July 4, 1864. from the States that had seceded.

The number of officers and men in the Regular Army among whom the casualties herein noted occurred is esti-
mated at 67,000; the number in the Veteran Reserve Corps was 60.508; and in Hancock's Veteran Corps, 10,883.
. The other organizations of white volunteers, organized directly by the U. S. authorities, numbered about

11,000.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

WASHINGTON, July 15, 1885.

Approved, and will be printed as a supplement to the statistical exhibit of deaths in the U. S. Army during
the late war. R. C. DRUM.

Adjutant- General.



STATISTICAL EXHIBIT



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STATISTICAL EXHIBIT






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STATISTICAL EXHIBIT 4497



There were in the service during the war as of this State 400,000 individuals; of
these there died in the service 53,114.

Of these 400,000 there are claimed as New York Volunteers 310,000 indivduals, of
whom there died in the service 48,055.

The Commissioner of Pensions estimates that of the soldiers discharged for dis-
ability 25,284 died during the period of the war up to July I, 1865. The pro rata share of
this number as from this State would be over 4,000, and added to those who died in ser-
vice, would make the number of deaths of those from this State 57,114. and of the State
Volunteers 51,055.

Based on the foregoing there were survivors at the close of the war of those from
this State 342,886, and of the State Volunteers 258,945.

Of these survivors it is supposed that there entered into the service:

Individuals to the Credit of the State.

In 1861 and 1862 200,000, less 28,557 who died as above, leaving 171,443 survivors.

In 1863 and 1864 170,000, less 24,273 who died as above, leaving 145,727 survivors.

In 1865 3,ooo, less 4,014 who died as above, leaving 25,716 survivors.



Total 400,000, less 57,114 who died as above, leaving 342,886 survivors.

State Volunteers.

In 1861 and 1862 155,000,165325,528 who died as above, leaving 120.472 survivors.

In 1863 and 1864 132,000, less 21,727 who died as above, leaving 110,273 survivors.

In 1865 23,000, less 3,800 who died as above, leaving 19,200 survivors.



Total 310,000, less 51,055 who died as above, leaving 258,945 survivors.

Elsewhere the average age of those who entered the service was estimated to have
been 25 years at the time of such entry.

This average age probably does not apply actually to those men who entered the
service in 1861 and 1862, as a very large number of them were very young men; their
average age may therefore be presumed to be lower, say 24 years of age; in 1863 and
1864, as still a large number were young men, their average age may be estimated to have
been, say 2^/2 years; in 1865, for the number of older men predominated largely then
and there were but very few young men, their average age was probably 27 years.

Adding to these average ages the average time from entry to close of war, would
make the average age for all, those who served as of this State and those who served
in New York Volunteers, at the close of the war 27 years.

Service in the war left its effects on every one, especially those who served any
length of time or who were disabled in the service by disease or wounds. The Commis-
sioner of Pensions finds the effect of the service in the case of men, pensioners, who
were wounded or otherwise disabled in the service to be equal to the shortening of the
expectation of life by twelve years and bases his statement on the examination of 16.000
cases; he also estimates the number subject to this shortening of life to be about one-third
of the survivors.

There are estimated to have been survivors of those who served as of this State,
342,886; one-third of these is 114,295 whose life expectation is shortened by twelve
years; the remainder, 228,591, are to be taken as of 27 years of age at the close of the war.

Of those who served in the State Volunteers 258,945; one-third of these is 86,315,
whose life expectation is shortened twelve years; the remainder, 172,630, represent men
27 years old at close of war.

Based on the American table of mortality there would probably have died by the end
of 1908 of those who served as of this State 242.145. leaving 100,741, or 29.38 per cent, as
survivors; as of State Volunteers, 182,725, leaving 76,220, or 29.40 per cent, as survivors.
282



4498 STATISTICAL EXHIBIT



Of these survivors the average age would then be about 68 years, as the dead no doubt
contain a larger proportion of the older men. Taking this age as a basis there would be
in 1915, fifty years after the close of the war, 68,141 or 16.95 per cent, and 43.798 or 16.91
per cent, respectively, as survivors. There were 16,000 officers of the New York Volun-
teers, whose average age at time of entry in service has been estimated to have been 27^/2
years; adding to this, as average length of service, two and one-half years, would make their
average age at close of war 30 years.

These 16,000 include 1,674 who died in service; suppose that twenty-six died out of
service but during the period of the war, this would leave as survivors 14,300 of those
who served as officers in the New York Volunteers. (Note these are included above in
the numbers of State Volunteers.)

By the end of 1008 there would have died of these, based on the American table of
mortality, and allowing for the shortening of life expectation for one-third of them,
11,015, leaving 3,285 or 22.97 per cent, survivors whose age may be estimated as 70 years,
the deaths so far having been largely of the older men, and of whom the year 1915 may
see 1,722 or 12.04 per cent, as survivors.

There is another way to consider, in which an estimate as to probable survivors may
be made.

The Commissioner of Pensions states in his annual report for 1907 that there were on
the pension roll June 30, 1907, 628,084 survivors of the War of the Rebellion, including
the claims of 7,099 not yet adjudicated. Under the present laws relating to pensions all
who served in the war at least ninety days and were honorably discharged are eligible
to be placed on that roll, and presumably about all are there, except deserters and men not
honorably discharged, of whom it may be estimated there are living in 1908, 41,916;
making the total number of survivors 690,000.

The Adjutant-General of the U. S. Army states (Appendix) that the enlistments
during the war, 2,778,304, converted into three years enlistment give of such to the num-
ber of 2,320,369. This number may also be taken as the number of individuals in the ser-
vice. From it must be taken, however, the men who paid commutation instead of serving,
86,724; the number stated by the same officer as having died in the sen-ice 359,528, and the
number estimated by the Commissioner of Pensions as having died after leaving the ser-
vice but before June 30, 1865, namely, 25,284; making the total to be deducted 471,536,
and leaving as survivors at the close of the war 1,848,833.

Deduct from these survivors (1.848,833) the men on the pension rolls and those
estimated not able to find a place there (670,000) and the result will be that 1,178,833
or 63.76 per cent, are supposed to have died by 1908 and that 670,000 or 36.24 per cent,
were then still living.

It will be observed that there is quite a difference in the percentage of living in 1908
between the result based on the American table of mortality and the foregoing based on
the report of the Commissioner of Pensions. It is conceded, however, that the American
table is not any longer reliable and that the expectation of life has increased since it was
made, by at least eight years. The mean between 36 and 29, equal to about 33 per cent.,
is probably the most reliable one to take for a base of estimate as to the living in 1908.

So far the estimates given above are based on the numbers supposed to be living at
the close of the war. Based on the number of individuals who entered the service of the
country, the results would be :

Of the 2,320,369, less 86,724 who paid commutation, namely 2,233,645 individuals who
are supposed to have served in the war, there are found to be living at the end of 1908
only 670,000 men or 30 per cent.

Of the 400,000 who served as of this State, there are found to be living at the end of
1008 only 100.741 men or 25.19 per cent.

Of the 310,000 individuals who served as New York Volunteers, there are found to be
living at the end of 1008 only 77,220 men or 24.91 per cent.



STATISTICAL EXHIBIT 4499



Of the 16.000 officers, there are supposed to be living at the end of the year 1908 only
3,285 or 20.53 per cent.

When will all the members of thaf Great and Grand Army, which fought for the
very existence of the Union, have assembled "Beyond" for a final review?

The number of enlistments and in this case also individuals who served in the Mexican
War is given as 116,321 ; from this must be deducted, kiWed 1,049, died of wounds 508, died
of disease (estimated) 10,875, a total of 12,432, leaving in 1848 as survivors 103,889. On
the pension rolls there were, June 30, 1908, all Mexican War soldiers being entitled to be
there, 2,932 survivors or 2.82 per cent, after the lapse of sixty years.

The last soldier of the War of 1812, Hiram Cronk, died at Ava, X. Y., May 13, 1905,
aged 105 years and 16 days ninety years after that war.

The last soldier of the War of the Revolution, Daniel F. Bakeman, died at Freedom,
Cattaraugus county, N. Y., April 5, 1869, aged 109 years, 6 months and 8 days eighty-
seven years after the war.









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