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Frederick Tomlinson Peet.

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I shall have some photographs taken to-
morrow if it is a promising day. My pan-
taloons if I wish any can be made in Wash-
ington. I have bought a very nice silver
watch for $13.50 Greighton intends to buy
one like mine for Charley. I shall see him
tomorrow and if possible sell him mine and
then send you the money to buy a better
one. I must now say good by. With
much love to all

I remain Your Affectionate Son

Fred.
To Mr F T Peet
Brooklyn

Greighton has Hatties watch.



IN CAMP OF INSTRUCTION 67

Camp of Instruction
Berdans US Sharp Shooters
Washington Jan 25th 62.
My dear Father

I have not answered your letter sooner
because I anticipated that Lieut Winthrops
refutal of the paragraph you mentioned
would reach you as soon as my letter, it
appeared in the Thursdays Tribune. I
suppose you all read it. I go to town to
day, I shall see Mr Morgan or Miss Mul-
holland. I tried several times to see Mr
Odell but have been unsuccessful he is
now in New York.

I shall endeavor to see Mr Gonkling
from Oneida County, also Miss Mary E.
Baldwin Jr. I received a note from
Creighton last evening acquainting me with
the fact of her being in Washington and of
her staying at Browns. The Captain is
much better and returns tomorrow to
Camp.



68 CIVIL WAR LETTERS AND DOCUMENTS

I met Miss Fanny Morrell last week and
had a few minutes chat. I intended to
send Robert some money but I find I can
not spare it. I am very sorry, but I had
so many little & great bills to pay that I
find I must economise to get through the
ensuing two months.

I have bought my watch, a very good
one, silver hunting case with a compass on
the plate which covers the works, it is
rather objectionable on this account, that
to look at the compass I must expose the
works.

I sent Hatties watch home with Creigh-
ton who intends to return the latter part of
next week, and be in Brooklyn by Satur-
day or Sunday.

If I should write to Harry Hubbell when
will it go and when may I expect an an-
swer? Wm I hear is to be on Monday.



IN CAMP OF INSTRUCTION 69

I am very glad of it. I will show him the
skirmish drill if possihle.

The weather lately has been raw &
damp it" such a thing is possihle. the sky
looked muddy hut the streets beggar de-
scription. An officer at Willards a few
days ago was talking of the mud ; he said
that a cannon got fast in it on the other
side of the river, and could not be moved,
all the horses on the Potomac were hitched
on but without effect and it remains there
yet.

I received the hymn books which will do

very well. Will send the money soon.

Love to all, I remain

Your affectionate Son

Fred.
F. T Peet

I received a letter from Rebekah yester-
day, I thought I had answered Sarah, I
will do so soon. F.



70 CIVIL WAR LETTERS AND DOCUMENTS

Head-Quarters,

First Reg't Berdan's U. S. Sharpshooters,

Gamp of Instruction

Washington, Jan. 27 1862.
General,

I have appointed Frederic T. Peet, Jr
2nd. Lieut, of Co. H. 1st Regt. Berdan's
U S. Sharpshooters.

I have the honor General to ask that he
may be mustered into U. S service from
Jan. 1st, 1862 at which time the Go. was
full, and to remain

Very Respectfully
Your Obd't Servant
H. Berdan
Gol. Gom'd'g U. S S S.
Brig. L. Thomas,

Adj't. Gen. U. S. A.



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72 CIVIL WAR LETTERS AND D0CUMENT8

Head-Quarters,

First Reg't Berdan's U. S. Sharpshooters,

Gamp of Instruction

February 11, 1862
Dear Father

I have just received your letter with the
list of articles sent.

1 am quite well have had a cold & sore
throat for the last week or two but am all
right now. I have been unable to go to
the city for two weeks before yesterday,
when I was sworn in as an Officer, at 12
OGlock M. On your sending the Bis-
hops letter to the Prest, I gave it Goz
Ned; he promised to deliver it to Mr Lin-
coln on his receiving the position on Mc-
Glellans Staff. When he obtained the ap-
pointment he wanted me to meet him at 12
or 1. O'Clock any day and he would go
with me to see Mr Lincoln. I have been



IN CAMP OF INSTRUCTION 73

unable to see him at the time named but
will go down if possible this week. I have
been several times to see Mrs Welles ;
twice met Mr W. I have also been six
times to see Mrs Median but she is
always engaged. She spoke to Mrs Welles
of me who told her of my unsuccess in see-
ing her. I have been vaccinated, it has
not taken, I shall try again. I am sorry to

hear that about George E , he was

rather wild, this may sober him down.

I enjoyed Wms visit very much he
seems enjoying good health. I was some-
what surprised as he wrote me that he was
not very well just before.

Tell Fred Terry to write to me.

I have just preferred charges against a
man in the Vermont Go. for disobeying
me. He was sitting on the rifle pit ; when
ordered by me to get up he refused, he



74 CIVIL WAR LETTERS AND DOCUMENTS

was on guard at the time, then a man has
no right to speak or sit but must walk his
post, and always keep the muzzle of his

gun up.

You are rather hard on Henry S . I

have no doubt but that he will reenlist. I
send Sarah my photograph ; if Julia likes
my first better I will send her one. Our
rifles will arrive in about two weeks then
we will be off. If in Banks division we
will lead the army as no doubt our Rgt
will be next to the enemy on picket. Now
I must say good by. Give my love to
Mother, and the rest.

With love I remain Your affectionate

F.
To Mr F T Peet.

Will you be so good as to ask Harry
Torrance to send me 10 lbs of English
Breakfast tea as soon as possible. I will



IN CAMP OF INSTRUCTION 76

send back the money as soon as I receive
it and know the cost. I will send you the
money for the hymn books next pay day.
At our last meeting the tent was full, there
must have been 150 persons present, that
is quite an improvement as the first meet-
ing consisted of some ten or twelve.

F



Head-Quarters,

First Reg't Berdan's U. S. Sharpshooters,

Camp of Instruction

March 3, 1862
My Dear Father

I am sorry that I have not written for so
long. My finger was very sore. I was
afraid I was to have a felon, it passed off in
a few days as I applied caustic. My finger
is now as black as can be, while it was sore
I did not write. Henry Torrance sent me



76 CIVIL WAR LETTERS AND DOCUMENTS

some tea the 17 last month, pkges are al-
ways sent up, hut I sent to the Office today
and found it there. He also sent the field
glass, for which I am very much obliged.
I can not tell you how pleasant it is to find
I am not forgotten. I know the glass, al-
though a necessary thing, is still an expen-
sive one, and I promise you all that good
care will be taken of it.*

I shall send for it tomorrow. I received
an invitation to Mrs Welles party tomor-
row night. Mrs McClellan had one some
two weeks ago.

Our rifles are expected here this week.

I was Officer of the Guard twice last
week and twice officer of the Patrol.

My duty as Officer of the Guard is to
superintend the guard, see that the Reliefs
go & come regularly, and that they all do



•It was taken by the Rebs at rifle pits Yorktown, Va. F. T. P.



IN CAMP OF INSTRUCTION 77

their duty. We are on duty from Guard
Mounting 8.30 a. m. 24 hours.

When officer of Patrol, 1 take a squad of
men and wander about the camp endeavor-
ing to catch any one who has heen ahsent
or is not in his tent. One night about two
months ago immediately after pay day, 1
caught 17 men.

Last night I took no men but went the
rounds alone. I came to one post and
could find no sentinel, at last I called for
him, and he with the man on the next post
emerged from a tent near their line of
march. It was raining and they had shel-
tered themselves, but were a little too
soon, as I reported it to the Officer of the
Guard who will make a note of it in his
report. I forgot to say that last Monday
when Officer of the Guard I caught two
more men. They were absent from their



78 CIVIL WAR LETTERS AND DOCUMENTS

Company Street address. I placed a man
at each end of their street, from eleven to
one, when if the men were not then
caught, the guard would be relieved by
two others from 1. to 3. About 12. they
were brought in. I took their names, and
then sent them to their quarters. Re-
ported them next morning.

It is raining very hard, sometimes mak-
ing such a racket on the canvass that one
can scarcely be heard speak.



Head-Quarters,

First Reg't Berdan's U. S. Sharpshooters,

Gamp of Instruction

March 6, 1862
My dear Mother

Your letter I received to day. I have
concluded to do as you propose and write



IN CAMP OP INSTRUCTION 79

a part every day, having my regular days
for sending them.

As for tobacco I dont see how you heard
of my using it. You have no idea how
pleasant a pipe is. I dont smoke segars,
as they are too expensive, but confine my-
self to pipes. I attended Sec Welles party
last night and remained in town over night.
I had a pleasant time, met some friends of
Miss Sneeden also met Miss Bessie Casey.
She is exceedingly pretty. Mrs, Miss &
George Morgan were there.

The coat Cousin Ned gave me is a very
fine large dark blue army coat, without
cape, worth I suppose $35 or $40. My
large boots I gave away having made a
bargain with Mr Winthrop for a pair
which he had which were lighter, but the
latter after a short time proved too tight,
so he took them back. I have been with-



80 CIVIL WAR LETTERS AND DOCUMENTS

out boots for the last month waiting until
pay day. I find that we will not be paid
for six weeks in order to allow the Mis-
souri troops the money, they having been
unpaid for six months. I want about 25 or
30 dollars lent me until pay day. We ex-
pect a movement almost every day, so
please dont delay. The U S Government
is debtor to me to the amt of 100 or 200
dollars, so you see I am good for the
money.

I have just received my glass, it is a
very fine one, every one who sees it
praises its quality. I must get a strap for
it. I did not intend to write but a few
lines when I began but I find quite a long
letter has been written.

So I will say good by, and commence my
new plan tomorrow. Don't delay sending



IN CAMP OF INSTRUCTION 81

the money, as every moment is precious.
With love I ever remain

Your affec Son

Fred.



Head-Quarters,

First Reg't Berdan's U. S. Sharpshooters,

Gamp of Instruction

March 7, 1862.
March 7.

Dear Mother

To day I commence my new method of
writing a few lines daily, I think it quite a
good idea.

The day has been fine ; drilled two hours
in the morning, men drilled very well.
Received a letter from Father this after-
noon he was greatly mistaken about my
smoking qualities, and not less about its
effect. I have gained instead of loosing



82 CIVIL WAR LETTERS AND DOCUMENTS

weight ; when I arrived weighed some 143,
now weigh 154 lbs an increase of 11 lbs.
Our tent smoked 200 cheroots made of a
mild tobacco, in 3 days, instead of 300 in
one day. Tonight is very pleasant, stars
shining and moon as far as it goes is beauti-
fully bright. I am writing by the rather
dim light of an adamantine candle. Gap-
tain away in Washington. Winthrop look-
ing as much like a mummy as possible is
wrapped up in my red blanket asleep on
the couch.

I will now close tonights part. Have
one letter to write more, then after finish-
ing the remainder of my lemonade I shall
stretch myself on the floor and go to sleep.

The camp is perfectly still, nothing is
heard but the barking of a dog and the
tread of the sentinel.



IN CAMP OF INSTRUCTION 83

March 8th

Day was fine, drilled two hours in morn-
ing. Captain returned at 12. m.

Passed a pleasant nights rest, up at re-
veille, had a good breakfast. Received
letter from Father in the afternoon, I am
tired & will go to bed.
March 8th [9th]

I am Officer of the Guard today. Have
five prisoners, two came today. Sun has
been out all day quite like spring. Col re-
ceived a despatch from Sharp Manufactory
yesterday saying that our rifles will be in in
the course of a week. Saturday the 2d
Rgt was to leave camp for Falls Church,
but the order was countermanded by Gen.
McClellan. About two hundred of the 3d
Rgt arrived here yesterday, more are ex-
pected this week.

It is now past nine Oclock P. M. A



84 CIVIL WAR LETTERS AND DOCUMENTS

corporal and myself are the only occupants
of the tent at present. The Sergeant of
the Guard has just gone to get my Old Do-
minion Coffee pot to make coffee to keep
us awake.

Received a visit from Charley Guild
with a friend to day ; he & his mother
came to see me some weeks ago. I wish
Mother you would call upon Mrs Guild,
she is staying at the Mansion House,
Brooklyn. Charley is in the Navy De-
partment. The Gentleman who came with
him attends particularly to the Marine af-
fairs in the Navy Dpt ; he says that all the
officers have been appointed, the men now
being advertised for are merely to fill up
Rgts.

Looking over the list of prisoners re-
leased from the 1st California (Col Baker)
I saw John Blacks name. I wonder if he



IN CAMP OF INSTRUCTION 85

is our cooks son. I wish I could find out.
We might do something for him.
March 10.

We have had another rather pleasant
day no drill however as the mud is so
deep. To night news came that the army
is in motion, while the chances are that the
Sharp Shooters will he left behind, being
unarmed. Our officers are greatly excited,
two companies will, it is expected, offer to
take any arms so long as we are ordered
forward; two companies are already armed
with target rifles, they also will go ; the
four other companies are working that
way. I am in hopes that our Rgt will be
sent on, even if armed with only broom-
sticks. If they do not give us something I
will be utterly disgusted, almost discour-
aged. Our officers will make no effort in
the matter as to do so would be to kill it



86 CIVIL WAR LETTERS AND DOCUMENTS

utterly, so many lies have been told the
men that they are in turn disgusted. What
an awful thing it would be if we are to be
left behind. Think of it, been here five
months without arms, and then when the
great fight of the war comes ofF to remain
in the rear. We must obey however,
come what will.

All last night the rumbling of the wagons
and artilery could be heard as they passed
into Virginia. To day Penn Av & N. Y.
Av have been one long string of soldiers ;
while I write I can hear the marching mu-
sic in the other camps. The Col has been
in town all the day, he remains there to
night, he had an interview with Gen
Marcy, Chief of the Staff, I hope he
pushed our matter.

A letter has been received to day stating
that the rifles will be here on the 20th, just



IN CAMP OF INSTRUCTION 87

about three weeks after the time appointed.
Well we must wait. I wont write any
more, tell Father I received the money and
am much obliged.

With love to all I remain

Your affectionate Son

Fred.

Augusta sent me a box of eatibles some
time ago. I received a letter from her a
few days ago. Tell Father he spelt until,
untill!!!!!



Camp of Instruction

1st Rgt U S S S,

Wash March 15, 62.
Dear Father,

I have just received your letter. I have
been so excited about the move that I for-
got to keep up the new method of writing.
I shall commence again to night however.



88 CIVIL WAR LETTERS AND DOCUMENTS

Sunday I was Officer of the Guard, and
obliged to remain in the Guard tent all day
and night, except when off on my duty,
such as looking after the sentinels etc.
That is the reason why I gave no account
of the day. I hope it will relieve Mothers
mind. Yesterday, the day was not clear,
nor yet rainy, it was one of those brown
days (peculiar to this climate). I was de-
tailed to superintend the wood cutting. As
all the men have stoves or fireplaces, much
wood is consumed ; the amount given by
Uncle Sam is not generally enough, so
once or twice a week five or ten men are
detailed from each company to go back
into the country, generally near a fort,
where the trees are already cut down, and
there cut and split 16 or 20 load.

I went yesterday, had a very pleasant
time, walked some five miles to Fort Sara-



IN CAMP OF INSTRUCTION 89

toga ; had 35 men, & 8 teams, we sent 16

loads.

It rained a little at dusk. Had a very
pleasant speaking meeting in the evening,
room was crowded. This morning it was
very dark, it has rained nearly all day, the
floor of my tent is soaking wet, I dont
mind that as I have on an excellant pair of
boots.

1 do hope that our rifles will arrive next
week. I am going to tight unless things
look brighter soon. I wrote to Mr. Ban-
croft some month or six weeks ago but
have received no answer. Give my love
to all, tell Mother I am all right.

With love I remain

Your affectionate Son

Fred.

Can my rifle be exchanged for a hunting
one ? it was bought of Fish. Received a
letter from Hattie this week.



90 CIVIL WAR LETTERS AND DOCUMENTS

Camp of Instruction

1st Rgt. U S, S, S,

Wash March 18, 62.
Dear Father,

I sent Wm a few lines yesterday saying
we were under Marching orders. I write
now to you to refund the money borrowed
and to communicate a few particulars.

I drew the money from Briggs banker,
who knows you. Mr Winthrop introduced
me to him. W & I drew two months pay
by giving 2 1-2 p. cent.

We leave here tomorrow morning for
Alexandria, from there we will take trans-
ports and proceed to Fortress Monroe. I
have been in town to day buying nicknacks
and bidding good by to my friends.

I called on Mr Welles & saw him, Mrs
Welles, Mr, Mrs, Miss & George Morgan.

Mr Morgan by way of a joke in the



IN CAMP OF INSTRUCTION 91

presence of Mr Welles asked me if I was
ready to take a position in the Navy, I
suppose he ment Marines. I answered
that I certainly was, had become infatuated
with military life etc.

Our Rgt was at first ordered to Gen
Porters Division ; the order is counter-
manded, and now all the Sharp Shooters
1st & 2d Rgt are in McDougals. I heard
from pretty good authority that the expedi-
tion would number some 120,000 men.
McClellan & Staff will go, quite a number
of vessels now are anchored off Alexan-
dria, Banks only remains behind. Al-
though we start tomorrow we may not be
shipped for a day or two.

Our rifles are not yet done, we will have
Colts rifles sent to Fortress Monroe with
us. Should the Sharpes come while we
are there, we will take them. I send $10



92 CIVIL WAR LETTERS AND DOCUMENTS

to Wm, I owe it to him. Will you be so
good as to see that he receives it.

I send a lock of my hair to Sarah as she
wished, had I not sent it to day she would
have been obliged to go without, as I have
been plushed, that is my hair is all cut off.
The barber at Willards said it was shorter
than any yet cut there. Give my best love
to Mother & the girls, tell Henry I will
send him the pay for tea tomorrow.

I shall leave my trunk here, at a house
in the neighborhood, but will send the rifle
home by express ; if possible get it changed
for a hunting rifle & give it to Fred Terry.

I bought a bag to carry my traps in as
we are not allowed a trunk. With love to
all I remain

Your affectionate Son

Fred T. Pekt.
To F T Peet Esq



ON BOARD TRANSPORT EMPEROR 93

Will write on arriving at Alexandria.
This pen gets full of ink being a long soft
gold one, so you must excuse the blots.



On board Transport Emperor

U S S S March 24, 62
Dear Mother

We are now in sight of Fortress Monroe,
the day has been delightful, sea smooth as
glass, nothing has yet been seen of the
Merrimac. Some of the Potomac flotilla
escorted us down. Although the rebels
have a battery at Aqua Greek they did not
fire at us. Capes Charles & Henry we
have just passed on our left, a light house
was built on Cape Henry last Spring but
has never been lit.

Fortress Monroe the Rip Raps and
Hampton Seminary are directly seen ahead



94 CIVIL WAR LETTERS AND DOCUMENTS

of us. The red light sloop, which some
months ago was captured hy the rebels,
lays on the left of the Fortress, carrying
the Stars & Stripes. The sight now is
beautiful, our fleet stretching for miles be-
fore & behind is following the Daniel Web-
ster (Flag Ship). Our glorious old flag is
flying on every side, while the bands are
playing enthusiastically; it stirs a man's
blood up to see such a sight. Every spot
is covered with the blue coats of the sol-
diers. Do you know that the Fortress &
Rip Raps were built of stone taken from
Massachusetts? It is completely encircled
by vessels, some are men of war.

I never enjoyed a trip so much before,
nor ever did I see a more beautiful sea,
just sufficient wind to make it pleasant.
The water all day has been covered with
ducks ; our men have shot at some but



ON BOARD TRANSPORT EMPEROR 96

have killed none as yet. I can hardly

keep account of the days. To day being

Sunday has been rather quieter with me

than yesterday. I took the Testament

Sarah gave me and read some chapters.

We are among the War Vessels so I must

cease for a while and find out what is to be

seen.

March 25. th We arrived opposite the

Fortress at 3 or 4 P M ; there lay the little
Monitor. The best description of it was
given by the rebels when they compared it
to a raft with a cheese box on it. I will
give you an idea of it by this rough draw-
ing (Drawing of Monitor).

The rebel flag on Sewells Point can be
distinctly seen with the aid of my glass.

We received orders and immediately
proceeded up the roads to Hampton Vil-
lage ; we are now in Hampton Greek op-



96 CIVIL WAR LETTERS AND DOCUMENTS

posite the remain of the burned Village. I
slept all night well, rose at 6.30 had some
coffee, cold potatoes & bread. We are
about to land so I must wait a little longer
before closing my letter.

I guess I had better send this & write
again on arriving at our bivouacking
ground. I send my letters; one written on
the voyage to William.

With love to all I remain your

affectionate Son

Fred.

I have no time to read over this letter so
pray excuse all blunders.



Gamp Porter 1st Rgt U S S S,

Near Hampton Va. Porter's Division

March 30, 62.
Dear Father.

I will just copy some lines from my jour-
nal. This is the third letter I have written



CAMP PORTER, NEAR HAMPTON, VA. 97

since leaving Washington March 24. We
arrived at Hampton some time during the
night. Left the hoat near nine o clock. A.
M. next day, and strolled about the ruins
of this once pretty village. I picked up
some violets and made quite a little bou-
quet. The day was warm, and reminded
me more of the sunny south than any thing
yet seen. Some of the men occupied their
time in finding souvenirs of the late fight-


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