Copyright
[from old catalog] ed Sylvanus Urban (pseud.).

The Gentleman's magazine online

. (page 1 of 116)
Online Library[from old catalog] ed Sylvanus Urban (pseud.)The Gentleman's magazine → online text (page 1 of 116)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project
to make the world's books discoverable online.

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject
to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books
are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover.

Marks, notations and other marginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the
publisher to a library and finally to you.

Usage guidelines

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing this resource, we have taken steps to
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying.

We also ask that you:

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for
personal, non-commercial purposes.

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help.

+ Maintain attribution The Google "watermark" you see on each file is essential for informing people about this project and helping them find
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it.

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe.

About Google Book Search

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web

at http : //books . google . com/|





i



UBlltAaX^iiiSaS^ OF THE




Digitized by V^OOQIC



.&3






Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



A



Digitized by



Google



/



r



Digitized by



^oogk



I

I



Digitized by



Google



w

/



Digitized by



google



7zo7



TSl



Gentleman's Magazine :



AND



Historical Chronicle;

For the Year 180Q.

Volume LXXIX.

Being thb SECOND of a NEW SERIES.

PART THE FIRST.



PRODESSE ET DELECTARE. iSS^^'^^ £ PLVRIBUS CKUH.



By SYLVAJ^US URBAN, Gent



LONDON, Priqtea by JOHN NICHOLS and SON, •
2X Cicero* iileqd. Red Lion Passage, Fleet Street;
where Letters are particalarly requested to besent^ PosT-PiiiD.

And sold by J. HARRIS (Successor to Mrs. NEWBERY),
at ibe Corner of Si. PauFs Church Yard, Ludgate Street. 1 W9.

Digitized by \^00QIC



TO SYLVANUS HEBAN, Gent.

Vpmik hk cfmpUthig the Sbvbwty-ninth Volvmx
^ of The. Gbiitlbman*^ Magaziki^.

RtMOVG lae l^m^ ibfitidiouft Bards oif phymoy
Who sbot\ie with flattery some departed Chkf,
Or blandish o*cr his virtues or his crime, ,

In artful song of never-eQ^ipg grief.
But let me, watchif\il of Qiy yearly care^

For ever ^hun such mean and triv^l themes ;
Content ^o praise thy lajtw^rs for my shar«,
^' i^vffifi^>^j«itqiiy> without extremes.

Reflective of the year that's past and gone.

And mindful of the varied scenes of life,
Hiy Magazine, unrivaTd, stands alone.

The public record of our peace or strife.

Thei«, tp ^v^rt qjir melancholy hours,

A8_tpij)9a^*94u^> or &VO|iri|^ fblli^ jisQb
Observan{ a3so of the Foreign Powers,

Burdens of War, of Taxes, and Supplies.

And nothing loth Corruption e'en to show.

Of malversations done on sea or land ;
Or Mrs. ClarKb bj^flotfe the Houss b^V¥^,

Making a marvellotis uncommon stand.

Or to some mouldering heaps of ruins stray.
Whose waUs with ivy and with ipgss Q'ergrpwii,

X^^lilRtth? Sj^t^ew KiDgi in war array*
Have dignilied the monument^ stone. -

Wth thee we oft recall the days of yore.
When shouts^ ^^l^pii|s s^Qp|4^ thrcju)^ t|ie dome.

Whose festive hiaus l^ive cheer'd the village poor.
And sent them happy to their scanty home.

Where torrid lands or frigid stretch around.
Wide o'er their moiupttaius or theuf valleys roani.

We dwell with Priests sometimes on holy ground^
Oif *b^ ia F^ngy's ipaze much nearer 1]£^

So miscellaneouis in tbjr monthly toil.

We read of brooding Mischief's awful doom.

With deeds of heroism ^nd wartike spoil.

And midnight orgies reeking £rom the ^Ittiojapu

Oe1:^come at last amidst the unequal strife.

When Kemblb iistensi:o the O. P. throii|^,
Renew^ :y^i^ !;^iK?V^ H^ the^tr^ hk^ ^ .^ '

Thus as you tread life's sharp and toilsome way.
In works like tbese, the records of your f^one,

Ixnag may you be tbs herald of the day,
AnAiiitaselJiiir^ts celebrate yo\]i|*claim>

But, wWktMve* Ojif9ueaoomevwhei!C^

^J'^^w^rflS'^ ^"W*' ^^wy ye^te ^

Tnat in jrdor frieadship I have stiH a shar^



Digitized by



Google



PREFACE

TX> THE SEVENTY^INTH YQlXmR..



\jLAD indeed would §yia^anus Urban be to ijoiv^r
«ratulal;e h.i» stUl-increasii^g circle of Friends and Corr^
^xidenU on beholding a New Y^tr inixoduced witb
brighter rays in the Political Horijjon. Alas! and al^t
^ W still dark* gloomy, and discoura^i^. Scenei baiwj
^Cjurr^ and daily do occur> which scorn all paxAlkL frow
ths past> wd defy humw sagacity with respect ta qon^
il^q^^encea. We will, however, endeavour to circnUte.thft ^
^jsnotipn which we feel within us> and which prompts un
to exclaim, with one of the sweetest of our Modem roetili

My soul confideii.
In t^t oH-h^etling aod a^-foroiihg Power
Wli^9 ^n ^l^^ Radiant cby wben Time, waj^born,
Q^t bis, broad eyci upon dbue wild of Ocean,
And calm!d it with a glance ; then, phiogiog da0|>r
8|is mighty 40*0^^ plucVd from its dark dSndin
This. Throne of Freedom, lifted it to light,
Girt it with silver cliffs, and call'd it BiUTAiN,
t}^ did, and will preserve it.

Sufeb confidence mu^st be ow: bert, our only securi^
L(^ U^ tb^xv tujm from these sad prospects; and &»:
phefispol: with thQ anonating cposolation^ ttwt L^cativ^:
8^ r^M^s biW graceful. cre3t, still pursues. i«r custoioary
jWtto, uxfflW>b»tcd> receiving eivery where the sam^ kind,
CTcs^ipgV w^pnaes, .and applause^^-B^to perpetumt"
Xljqr np Nfirtional Institute dare to prescribe to cm? Yc^h^
tbfjt; Qf I^atiin tb^ sb»U learn v^ moi!ei than may q^taUfyc
tbi^ tjx umd^^ratand the« Coannentaries. of Ca^aat ; m«r: oft
Gm^ b^4w4 what ni^y enable? theWr ta: inA^pcet ie^,
nical phrsuseology ! Far be from us such tyranny ov€s^thf^:
Afuses^ which must inevitably lead to tb^ repetki|%^ of
that globmy period which distinguished and disgraced the
midcUe ages of the worid.

20644 On

, Digitized by VjOOQIC



iv PREFACE. '

On our oitn laliours of the Year that is passed, we arc
jsnabled to reflect with complacent satisfaction: but thid
serves only to ihcres^ejpui^ ^jrdbSii^lto preserve and perpe-
tuate all that is venef able** in science, useful to humanity,,
and accessary to intellectual improvement. Whilst we
keep tl^t, mth ,opgn,^,unob§t3fvic^ and adorned, which
has so-tong wen'frfeque'nted ^by our oldest aftd most re- "
spected Friends and CorresponBents, we have not been
remiss in the .endeavour- to explore others, which may
present new and enlivening prospects.

We earnestly, therefore, solicit the continuance;^ of that
Ctifiiit^ii9,nte which we' shall most strenuously endeavpur
to /3e^<erve. 'Yet can we hot bid our Readers farewell
THtHout reQoinHiending them to contemplate, with solemn
awe,^' tH^ scenes which are passing among the surrounding
NStfcns^rff the Continent; nor without entreating thetn
W tfeliietnber, with the earnestness of "long experiience and
oBSft-v^iicih, that public Security must have its foundatioh
m' pi^t^ie il-irtue. ^^ Ttilibus exerkplis npn Jktod- splum' <
^^uV^^ vertjim etiam histbrice r^ef'ertce sunt^ et quidirli
ma±ime nostrdef" ,

What will the future Historian say of a Century in'
which five Emperors have been massacred, five Kings
assassinated, six Sdvereigns deposed, five' Governments
extinguished, and' one mighty Kingdom swept froh> the
^ Charts irf Europe! :\: '

How will the Miise of History lieWafler descHbe an
obscure Individual who, in a very few fleeting, years,
dethroned five Moharchs, created by his own power eight .
others, treated the vast Empire of Spain as a subjugated
Pfovinfce; and extended his influenceand aiithority hr beytrnd;
thbse^tif CHARLEMAGNE,: whom 'he pi*opfSes! as Kj^ mbS^^
iftScheftked and unopposed but by Gkfex'4^ B^lTAii^'- alone ! -'
'•Lettheh 'this' idea be our corisolatfon; arid,'withdat'^
nicikingus presumptuous, letit inspire tis with honekxoti-
ffdteiice^-^REXt' Britain only h tempted from the deso^
lation which has infested almost every other portion of tfie^
hl^bitable world; — Let lis' also encourage the hope, that the .
Item<mt)fWarpidyjret be satiated, and that Pcfei^ ife^*
ortee more repbie' undisturbed in the sacred shades of the'
Muses.' ''.'"-'. : ' ' ■ ' * /:






il f/ih



Digitized by



Google



JAINUAKX, I8O9.
CONfjT^^ING



Briftol 5, Btiry
Camb.— Chath.
Carli^.-Cheftera
ChelmsCttAbriai

Mcteorolog.Dmriw forDed.l «0?,andJ«n. 1 900 f
Anccdoieof Quceti Elizabethi-jl'htf Marwoods a
ViiccinRtion ju*trfle(t by Time ^nd Experience 4
Hawkins oia i ttcFubllCJtt ton pP Walton's Anglei:^
Subscribers to Hist.of Lcicestcrshire—Kra^mus f»
Quantity of Rain fallen from I8O2 to 1SQ8 . il.
M<. John Combe, and his, School at Oxford . <
Mr. Rogers Rudrng's History of En|;lish Coins U
' Pfesefit State qf Ltnoolnshitie Motiasterids . li

* Tni Projector^ N^XCII . •• • »/:i«f

Imj»#fflce?tKHi« in&mmttwr!», fte.-tfcreCfotvfoohf
iit.Lawrcnceand St.NiCholaf Church¥s,Kenl 1:
lAnccdote of AirairHl Calnftaid)?— SiiidddS '.. ; lb.
NaC'^'f'atUckse-Rpltaphsoiii t»ieikrynos1icr$' u
E)tJL^tt^otit*« FiPfy-seVcRth Ldrer on Prisons 2*



Ireland sy
ScoTtiirft 34
'Manks Advertiser
Jcrfcyi.Gucrn.9.

Gh»fchChimes-Gre»tIncre9seofCheUenhanu7'.

Review op NjiW Pvblications ; m«.
ep.Warburton's Letters 41.— Hurdis'Pbems 43
Mr. Bcloe's Anecdotes 44.— Family Picture . 47
Baintis's Sermons^is. — Gardiner's $ermon ^ 4Q
Montagu's Natural History of British Shells 5i
Jilchri?5t onBcnJonson'sEnmiiy toShakspeare53
Tandy's Appeal 63.— Abrarf^ttasand Panthea 44
indfeusc ©I Sectarijtts 5 1,— times, atr Ode . 57
VI r. Ctrd's Charity .—Pa terson's Roads . . S8
■^jjTj^on Alhaiiite befweth Church and State 5.q
Vl'Grigoru^ Bancn^ft— L^fe of Dr. C.hafuTJan ib,
Literwy Inlelli^en^c*— Index lTi(Hcatorius . 60
Ski jECT POETRY, f<kr January !i'«09 . /.61— -(j^
t*roceedings in present Session ot PUfh'ament 6s



Mr. NeilUVReiiMHFkfrottv ^^l^rtiOfd Gael * -» . at^ C^f«sp<wdcnrcTvi<lTRussian&KrtnchG«vrrn.6j
A Free School? — Feast of St. WinitVed, Ad 24 Interesting iniell.frohi the London (!«a^eitcs 6«
lilustratiiiiisof HciV;^t:c, B<)ok H. Ei»i<ilcH. i 2.^ mJ^R.^P^'s Account of tJ^BatffcofCorunna Ji
VariationV>Cdnfc.Pfayer-hoOk* - f'rh« Collect 3] Vbstraftof thcprir>ciyal ff reifen Occu f fences 7 d
BasingstokeE4fh4ii*quisitio*oftplahtiiigfilms3? Jpufttry Ntws— Domt:s*iin Occur«^n/c«9 . , gc
AfTcuiTECTfjRAL l/< Kt)VATiot», No. CX)OC« «• Vif^dKiotis and Correftrofts in formeir'Otkits . . ,bi



Plan for imprhvinRthft Chant f»f PsaVms **\ 3(
t.jidl<)\vChtwfih,Ca8t\e,i^. c6.S«rop,(kSCTTbe(i ;);
A sure Remedy fot Sure T^roat.-^Tithes . 3^
'Vh^.^effoumoi Antonln*^'— R<im?iH Stiartons 31
Planting, of Oaks ht the Ns|vy rcLiommten^cci 4v



iirihs and Marriagci of eoiitient'Pcrfbns . . s^
Obituary with Anecd.'of remarkable Perlons Hi
^ill W Mortality from Dcr. 2) xu Jan. S4 . ^i
wera^ Pr)ccMt^l»eMarket>f.)r January . pj
>iii5r Vanatu««s iri ih» Prices of the Stocks . y<



Embelliilied with a* Portraitof Mr. John Combe, Founder of a Schorl at OxpoaHj^ «n<f a Viev
. of the Scuoot,>HOU«E ; and *l>o <witl»\Views Of the CMifRCHt* ctt St.LaWirk'mCa
' * [ ", anc^STl NiciroLAS, iu^he l^lc of -iiMNKv.



^^x\ s'ri r J



N U S

4r



URB.JN,'.(^E^r.



Vt'fMtd by i^TCHOLS ain<f SOM, at Cic«R.o*s Head, Red Lion Pas<sage, Flect-strret, London
where ail Letters to the Ed)tr»r ajre desired to be addre^ised, Pos?'-pai». jsoo.



Jigitfeed.by ^PO^ KlT



METEOKOLOGieAL DiARt for December 1808. By Vt Vole, BrisM.



i



00 I



B 6»-



WEATUEK.



1 40.46 29- '5 cloudy at times, windy *

2 49 49 29- 2 mostly cloudy, high wind, some rain

3 43 47 29-7 mostly clear, high wind

4 36 43 29-17 clear

5 46 51 31-1 fuggy, cloudy,, some , very liffhjt r^in

6 48 51 i29-17 mostly cloudy, some light tain, high find
1 39 42 29-17 ■ ditto

8 38 43 29-J3 -mostly clear

9 43 44 29-16 cloudy,* frfequentlij,^! rain

10 38 43 29-13 cfoudy

11 27 33 30- 3 morning very foggy, afternoon dear

12 27 38 30- 3 » ditto

13 33 34 Sp- 3 , doudy, rather foggy

14 36 42 30- 3 " cloudy, rather foygy, spme very light roiR,

15 32 37 30- ' cloudy at times

16 31 36' 29-19 mostly cloudy, some' light ram

17 35 40 29- 9 mostly cloudy, light raiu, high wind

18 24 30 . 29-12 clear •

19 26 29 29-11 clear ,\ .^ ^

20 * 22 28 29-11 • mostly clear

21 19 33 29-15 morning cloudy, afternoon snowy

22 28 31 29- 3 cloudy, very snowy, high ^md

23 24 29 29- 6 cloudy in general, some light snow ^\'

24 27 30 . 29- 7 doudy

25 , 22 28 29r 8 cloudy

26 23 23 29- 6 mostly cloudy, evening snowy '.

27 28 32 2*9? 6 cloudy

28 35 40 29- 7 cloudy, •vening rainy

29 40 40 29- 5 cloudy, ligl^t rain most of the day

30 36 39 29- 6 cloudy, rauiy at times

31 r '37 37 29- 7 cloudy, frequent light rain. . • ^

The average temperature for the month of December is included in the Tabkfs in-
serted in the last page.of pur Volumfe fur 1808, Part il. j and the quantity of Rain
fallen will be found in p. 8 of the present Number.



/Meteorologic


alTabxe for January 1809.


By W. Cart,


Strand, '


, Height of Fahrenheit's Thennometer, |


Height of Fahrenheit's Thermometer.






i




3arom.
in. pts.


Weather
in Jan. 1809.


II


III


1


ii
il


Barom.
in. pts.


Weather
in Jan. 180*.


Bee.





o









Jan.


o


o


o






27


30


35


36


,'52


rain


12


38


40


35


,50


clond>


«8


37


38


37


,50


rain


13


34


38


37


,68


ratn.


29


38


42


39


.49.


cloudy


14


31


33


30


,80


fair


\30


40


45


39


,50


cloudy


15


28


29


29


.75


snow


* 31


.39


37


37


,58


small rain


16


28


30


27


30,05


doudy


JaA


38


38


38


,57


rain


17


28


28


25


.01


fair


2


38'


40


33


,42


cloudy.


18


21 .


26


22


29, 85


cloudy


3


31


32


30


,35


snow


19


22


28


31


,58


cloudy


. -4


30


33


32


,65.


small rain


20


31


32


32


,44


cloudy


5


■33


33


33


,65


cloudy


21


3ii


34


33


,50


cloudy


6


39


46


44.


•,50


cloudy <


2*i


32


34


33


29,06


snow


1'


44


44


42


,15


rain


23


22


30


31


.70


fair


8


44


44


41


28,50


rain


24


33


35


40


.45


rain


9


41


43


42


29,20


rain


25


42


36


37


,75


doudy


10


43


46


37


,14


oloudy


26


42


48


45


,20


vtonny


u


'38


45


41


,40


(jjir















Digitized by



Google



f 3 ]



THE GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE



For JANUARY, 1809.






Mr. Urban,. *. - Jan. 5.

SHOULD the following Anecdote
of Q,ue^ EliznJbeth, for the au-
thenticity of whicli I can vouch, be
deemetl worth inserting', it will, 1 pie-
same, be iiiustrat^Te of tlie descent of
that Ycrj respectable family the Mar-
woods; some particulars of whom
are inserted in the Gent. Mag. vol.
LXL p. 608; and will particularly
oblige your constant Reader,

J. M. L.
During that part of the reign of
Queen Kiizabeth when the Larl of
Essex was most in favour, hi« Lord-,
ship had a disease in his foot. Which
baffled the skill of the first medical
men in the Metropolis, and his ex-
istence was despaired of. Dr. Mar^
wood of Honiton, a physician of the
first Eminence in the West of Eng-
land, whose fame had reached the
Qiisen's ear, was sent for, and wis
fortunate enough to perform the
cure; when her Majesty desired the
Doctpr might be introduced,- which
being done accordingly, &he asked
him what favour she could grant
bim, to satisfy him for the great
cure he had accomplished. And the
Doctor being already possessed of an
ampfe independence, which he had
iaherif^d from his ancestors and ac-
quired by his profession, said, " If
her >iaje«ty would grant him a fa-
vour (mentioning one. of a very tri-
Tiat nature), he should consider him-
self amply reward^.'* But the Uueen,
struck i^ith'hls choice, declared he
fhotiid accept of an estate near Houi-
ton, as a reward } which property
forms at present part of the immense \
landed property of James Thomas
Benedtctus Marwoodr esq. of Avi-
shays in the county of Somerset, and
Slitton in the county of Devon, his
lineal descendant.
H* any of jour intelligent Cor-



respondents could inform the pub-
lick of any particulars respecting the
Marwoods Baronets, who for a long
time resided in Yorkshire, it would
be esteemed a favour. J. M. L.

IMr. Urban, Jan, 6.

N my former Essays I have endea-
voured to lay before your Readers
a^ summary Review of the principal
Lvidence of the Merits of Vaccina-
tion; and the facts which I impar-
tially adduced musf, I thiak, be more
than suliicient to convince every can-
did observer, that the Cow-pox Ino-
culatiion, when properly conducted,
(toes afford an effectual and permanent
securUy against the Variolous tonta-
ffion, and that it excites no new dis^
eases, and ptoducei no injurious effects
upon the Constitution, Having esta-
bliJilied these important points, it
might be conceived that the discus-
sion of the subject was ended ; and it
might be expected that mankind
would universally concur, in eagerly
einbraciug the mild and safip preserva-
tive whrcn is ortered them, against a
disease, which has long been one of
the sorest scourges of the human
race. There is a popular argument,
however, which is not unfrequently
urged by those whp are not avowed
opponents of Vaccination, the insi-
dious nature of which is calculated to
produce considerable injury, by delay-
ing tJie progress of the K^w Inocula-
tion. Upon this aj-giiraent I beg leave
at present to <)ft'er a few remarks.

WeaHow, it has been said, that Vac-
cination may generally afford security
from the future viifection,of the Small-
pox, and we should be rvluctant to
oppose the high Authorities that sup-
port the practices but we think that
a sufficient time has not elapsed since
the promulgation of the Discove'ry,^
to enable the publick. to form a de-
cided



Digitized by



Google



C&w-PoJt justified' by Time and Experience. [Jan.



cided ofNoion of Ki mciits. At the
tamo time, we ail know that tbcSmait-
pox ha» been greaUv iHtlig:ated . by
the tM-fiteaL ha^Quq/l method of Ino-
euiatfon, tinder which aot more thau
j>..e4irthreehqiidro4dies. Why, tlicn,
shouidnre forsake a ceriaiuti^Ko adopt
an uMCtrtdint^ :' Why should we re*
linquish a System of Inoculation, the
beoetittf of whtcli haAo'beeiVcrvinced/
by thp experience of a Century, to
embrace a new System, in which wc
hnve had com para tiveiy littfe ex^jc-
rience ? . . 1 .

The objection that efficient time
hat nelhetin allowed y to put the efficacy
^f^^ecinaUon to the testy must have
arifcea from a want of information
on tixe Nature df the disease. Man-
kind are indebted to the genius and
indnstry bf Dr. Jenner; for the idea
of propagating the Vaccine Infectiou
from one human being to another, by
meate of Inocutatiou; and« certainly,
ten years only hate pasitcd, since he
made pdblic his discovery. But it
mast be remembt^red that, though
the Inoculation of the Cow-pox is a
tiovel practice, }et the disease, in it$
natural ttiite, hait been known for
time* imtnemorial, and its power of
urevehtmg .the * ^ntall-nox has long
been acknowledged. Tnere are many
w«il-authenticated instance! upon re-
Cord, iDf persons who were allected
with the casual Cow-pox* in their
J'oiith,to whom the Smalt-pox could
trtjver afterwards he communicated

. either 1>y inoculation or Coutas^ion';
luid who Itred to an adva^OMi old age^
ih the most perfect health, and per-
ffectly secure from the Variolous In-
fectrott. It must be unnecessary to;
ii:form any one, who has the smallest
;rc<)nftiotauce with, the Laws of Ph^si^
o\o^; that the Vaccine matter, alter
ftniing successively Croih arm to arm
through a thousand tsobj[e€ts, is pre*
eisely the same, in all it,s parts, as
when ori^i&allY takien from the Cow.
The Vaccine, thereibre, has in reality
undetgon^ as lomc & trial as the ^malf^
pox Inoculation itself. In those dis-

' trrct« wh^re it is most accustomed to-
prevail, the *» V&x Populi," for nearly
a century, has borne witness to its

♦ Dr. Jcnuor, in his ^stpnblictitioa on
tK^ subject, ^ives instances ik its prt'scrva-
tivr effects to thiu «^tcn<)e4 periqd of 51
yvars.



aftbrdliig a fall security from the
Sniall-Pox, and its eAects have ever
been considered as rather beneficial
thaA ti^jurious to the ei^tittitton. On
no subject, therefore, can- our'ev4«
dence be more complete, and more '
iirmly estiblished; and so far from -
there be[ilg a necteity for .further
time to form a proper opinion on its '
merits, it has the tfestiniony of Tirae^
and Bxperience, in the fullest degree*
' to support it.

Having endeavoured to obviate tbia
plausiblo objection, it remains to en*
quire whethePy in ike present improve4
state of Sntall'pox Inoculationy an^
suhsliiule is necessary or ejcpe'dient*
If the welfai*e of the individuais ino-
culated were exclusively tobeconat^
dcred, I should attach but little im-
portance to the Vaccine practice. But
wc mu\t bear in mind that it Li uut'
merely the decrease of danger «a()
suHering, on the part of those inocu*,
lated With Vaccine matter, as* com-
pared tuth those, inoculated ia tli^
ilormer way, that constitutes the^rcai -
advantage of Vaccination; It is tho *
singular and invaluable circumstance
of no contagiou being thereby eOvi*
municdted to others. The Tatloloua
Inoculation, it is true, nearly secures
those to whom it is appliedfi yet it
continues for ever to keep open the
source 'of danger to others. An iL^-
drvidual may uudergo the Small-poxp '
so as not to sufier any material inion-
venience; yet he necetisarily must com-
municate the contagion to some of
those with whom he associates. They,
iq the hid>ils of necessary' and orJi-
nar^ intercourse, may communicate
it to others i and thus the most fatal
of di^^orders may be disseminated,. in a
manner the conseduences of which it
is impossible to calculate. This4s tho.
reason why the mortality occasioned
by the Small-pox has been greater
since the introduction of Inoculatiou
than it wa9 before. The mitigation
of the disease has universally dimi-
nished the caution with ^bich it was
formerly avoided. Hence it arises* .
that the practice of Inoculation, whichy
\m prevailed among the higher 2ind.
middle clasffi of society, haaiiifiuiied
the r^aturaWsca^e more widdy among



Online Library[from old catalog] ed Sylvanus Urban (pseud.)The Gentleman's magazine → online text (page 1 of 116)