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Have we a national standard of English lexicography? or, Some comparison of the claims of Webster's dictionaries, and Worcester's dictionaries online

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in difficult cases, words are re-spelled. The lists of Scriptural, Classical, and Geo-
graphical names are very full — the latter more so than we have seen in any Diction-
ary; it comprises twelve or thirteen thousand names. Every American student,
and, as far as possible, every American family, should possess this great standard of
our language."




*• Get t&e Best."
" All young persons should have a standard

DICTIONARY

at their elbows. And while you are about it, get the test ; that Dictionary is

The great worTc unabridged. If you are too poor, save the amount from off your
back, to put it into your head." — Phrenological Journal.



WEBSTER'S aUARTO DICTIONARY UNABRIDGED.

" We believe we shall be certain of doing a service to the people of the State, if we
say a word or two upon the Unabridged Quarto Dictionary of the English Language,
by Noah Webster. The word UNABRIDGED has teen furposely employed^ because
if such a iP07'L is wanted for any but tlie tery loioest uses — those of mere orthogra-
phy, or orthoepy — it can not he too copiious and comprehensire. When one is igno-
rant of the proper and precise powers of a word, he can not endure to be turned
over to an abridgment that gives him a syxontm, instead of a definition ; but he de-
mands to know as much as any body knoics of its historj'- or etymology, and its dif-
ferent shades of meaning. Then only can he employ it with confidence and effect,
as a mighty weapon for the expression of intellect or passion." — Newarh Daily Ad-
vertiser, March 25, 1851.

"A Dictionary is the last book which a scholar ever wants to have ahridged, the
process being sure to cut off THE VERY MATTER WHICH HE MOST VALUES."

Chronotype.



Webster's Quarto Dictionary. — Every body knows about Webster's Dictionary,
and every man, woman, and child, ought to have access to it.

It will tell you every thing in regard to your mother tongue, which you want to
know. It shows you the words in all their aspects — giving you a sort of history of
each individual, that is in any way worthy of attention — developing their powers.and
delineating their features and general appearance so precisely, that the unlearned
will remember them, after the first sight, and know who they arc, and what they are,
whenever he meets them. A MAN WHO WOULD KNOW EVERY THING,
OR ANY THING, AS HE OUGHT TO KNOW, MUST OWN WEBSTER'S
LARGE DICTIONARY. It is a great light, and he that will not avail himself of it,
must walk in darkness. Every young housekeeper should lay it in, to occupy the
place which was formerly filled with decanters and wine-glasses.

Every farmer should give his sons tv^o or three square rods of ground, well pre-
pared, with the avails of which thej^ may buy it. Every mechnnio should put; a re-
ceiving box in some conspicuous place in the house, to catch the stray pennies, for
the like purpose.

Lay it upon your table bj"- the side of the Bible — it is a better expounder than
many which claim to be expounders.

It is a groat labor-saver — it has saved us time enough in one year's use to pay for
itself: and that must bo deemed good property, which will clear itself once a year.
If you have any doubt about the precise meaning of the word clear, in the last sen-
tence, look at Webster's thirteen definitions of the v. t." — Massachusetts Life Boat,
April 28, 1852.



TRUSTEES



Museum of Fine Arts.



FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT.



k



FOR, THE YEAR KN'DIING- DEC. 31, 1879




BOSTON:

ALFRED MUDGE & SON, PRINTERS,

34 School Street.

1880.



TRUSTEES



Museum oe Fine Aets.,



POURTPI ANNUAL REPORT.



jrOU. the: year KIVDHSTO- DKC. 31, 187©.




BOSTOK:

AL:FRED MUDGE & son, PRtNTEIiP,

3i School SxKiiEX,

1880.



REPOET OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.



Boston, Jan. 15, 1880.

The Executive Committee presents the following report for the
year 1879 : —

The east wing of the front was finished in the course of the
spring, at a cost of $57,313.08 ; and the whole cost of the addi-
tions and alterations undertaken after the subscription of 1878
was $60,814.12. The rearrangement of the collections rendered
necessary by these additions required the closing of the Museum
during the month of June. It was reopened on the 1st of JuW ;
and then, for the first time, there was space enough for the proper
exhibition of the collections, and for the convenient circulation
of the large numbers of persons who visit the Museum on the free
days.

The ventilation of the new wing is entirely satisfactory ; that
of the west wing has been improved, but is still imperfect. It is
expected that some changes, now in progress, will produce the
desired results.

The opening of the new rooms was immediately followed by
a large increase in the number of visitors, and during the last
seven weeks of the year the attendance was nearly doubled by
the unusual attraction of the Hunt Exhibition. The receipts for
admission and for catalogues have been considerably larger than
in 1878 ; but our expenses are also made larger by the cost of
taking care of the new rooms and of heating them. The receipts
are sufficient to pay only about one third of the current expenses
of the Museum.

By direction of the Trustees, three hundred and ninety-six life
tickets have been issued to persons who have contributed sums
of not less than $100 to our funds, or have given valuable works
of art to the Museum.

A small triangular piece of land in front of the Museum, bounded



b}" Dartmouth Street, Huntington Avenue, and a passage-waj^
running from one to the other of these two thoroughfares, has been
purchased for tlie sum of $2,630.05, with the purpose of keeping
it open. It is to be hoped that the city will iSnd it for the public
interest to secure the unoccupied land in front of the Museum
between St. James Avenue and Bojdston Street, and to lay it out
as a public square.

The receipts at the Museum have been as follows : —

For single admissions ...... $4,909 50

" season tickets ....... 68 00



From sales of catalogues . . .$2,657 15

Less cost of catalogues .... 2,359 43



1,977 50



297 72



Net receipts $5,275 22



The number of visitors at the Museum has been as follows : —

Paid admissions ....... 19,638

Free admissions . . . . . . . 137,553



Whole number of visitors 157,191

Average number on Saturda3-s . . . . . 1,161

" " " Sundays 1,509

" " of paying visitors on other days . 81

The School of Art Needlework has been removed from the
Museum. The pupils of the School of Drawing and Painting, and
those of the other Schools of Art in the building, have had free
access to the collections, but are not included in the foregoing
enumeration.

For the Committee,

MARTIN BRIMMER,

Chairman.



EEPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE MUSEUM.



Mr. PilESIDENT AND GeNTLEAIEN :

All increased number of visitors, the extensive additions made to
our collections both b}' gift and by purchase, and the interesting
character of the two special exhibitions held at the Museum during
the past } ear, warrant us in saying that during that time it has
both widened and extended its man}- beneficent influences.

If its attractions to tlie community at large are to be judged by
the fact that nearly 160,000 persons have visited it during the past
twelvemonth, and that on one Sunday, during the exhibition of
Mr. Hunt's pictures, there were no less than 4,400 in attendance,
then one may estimate them as ver^' great, and feel satisfied with
the position which the institution occupies in the public mind,
thanks to the constantly renewed efforts of all who are concerued
in its management to make it more and more worthy of patronage.

Among the late additions of special importance made to the
Mu-eum are the numerous casts of antique statues and bas-reliefs,
obtained from London, Paris, Berlin, Rome, and Atliens. Selected
with especial reference to the filling up of chronological gaps in the
series of casts, their arrival necessitated a rearrangement of the
whole collection. The result is so satisfactory that we have no
reason to regret the very considerable trouble taken to attain it.
We have now by far the best collection of casts in the United
States, and one of the best in the world. Among them are .-uch
masterpieces as the splendid Hermes with the Infant Dionysus,
by Praxiteles, lately discovered at Olj'mpia ; the noble Amazon bas-
relief from the Villa Albani ; several fine s ircophagi from the
Vatican ; one of the great bas-reliefs from the Arch of Titus ; and a
number of steles and fragments, some of which are not to be found
in the great collections of casts at Berlin or Paris.



6

At the same time the large collection of casts belonging to the
Institute of Technology was, by vote of the corporation of the
Institute, deposited in the Museum, and arranged in the large
room at the east end of the Luilding, which has been set apart for
architectural subjects.

The collection contains over six hundred pieces, illustrating
almost every important period of art, with specimens both of carv-
ing and of architectural sculpture. Among them are man}' casts
from the Saracenic work in the Alhambra, a portion of a collection
sent by the King of Spain to the Centennial Exhibition in 1876. •
Together with other casts from the same collection, previouslj' in
possession of the Museum, they nearly cover the west side of the
room, the remaining space being occupied by a number of casts of
Moorish work in Africa, presented to the Museum by Miss Brewer.
The adjoining room has been filled with casts from Italian marbles
of the time of the Renaissance. The next room to this, which com-
pletes the circuit, now contains the Greek collection of vases, the
Cyprian glass and potter}', and the charming figurines from Tanagra.
All these objects were removed from the first Greek Room, which
now contains nothing but casts from archaic marbles. Making the
circuit of the rooms on the first floor of the Museum, a peripa-
tetic lecturer might now discourse upon the histor}- of sculpture in
Egypt, Assj'ria, Greece, and Rome, with examples before him of
almost every phase of its rise and decline.

Very advantageous changes have been made by the Curator in
the arrangement of objects on the second floor of the building.
Tlie former picture gallery is now given up mainly to textile
fabrics, and presents an excellent appearance. The walls are
covered with tapestries, and tliese are separated from each other
bv those carved and gilt panels from the Hotel de Montmorenci
which have lately become the property in part of the Museum and
in part of the Boston Athentcum. On this acquisition we ma}'
well congratulate ourselves, for it may be safely said that an
opportunity of purchasing objects of like character and excellence
will not probably soon reoccur.

The Loan Room and the Lawrence Room remain very much as
tliey were, l)ut that formerly occupied by the Gray collection of



engravings is now filled with good examples of carved woodwork.
The engravings have been transferred to two rooms in the new
wing, speciallj^ prepared for their reception, and calculated to dis-
play them to the best advantage. In our judgment it would be
difficult to carry out the purposes of the gift more fully than they
have here been accomplislied. Man}^ hundreds of prints are per-
manenth^ exposed under glass, with written lists and explanations
prepired by the Curator of the Gray engravings, which add
greatly to the interest and popular value of the collection.

It remains for us to speak briefly of the two exhibitions held at
the Museum since the last annual meeting. That of Contera-
porar^" Art, which was held at the Museum in conjunction with the
Boston Art Club, opened on the 22d of April and closed on the
24th of May. It consisted of more than eight hundred pictures,
aquarelles, drawings, marb'es, bronzes, and casts sent b}' contribu-
tors from all p;)rts of the country. It was largely attended, but,
from whatsoever cause, failed to attract the general attention wliich
its unusual merits deserved.

This, however, has not been the case with the Hunt Exhibition,
■which^ opened on the 11th of November and was to have closed
on the 13th of December. The remarkable merit of the works
exhibited, and the ver}- deep regret felt throughout the community
for the melanchol}^ death of the distinguished artist, combined to
attract crowds of visitors throughout the time fixed for keeping the
exhibition open ; and shortly before the day approached for closing
it, a petition signed by many influential persons was presented
to the Museum Committee, praying fof its further continuance.
Under these circumstances, it was thought best to prolong the
exhibition, which, with certain unavoidable changes, will be kept
open till the end of January. In this connection, we are happy to
state that the receipts during the first five weeks of the Hunt
Exhibition have exceeded those of corresponding weeks in the last
3^ear by $1,100.

The combined good-will and hearty co-operation of the Trustees
of the Athenaeum, in all that tends to increase the value of the col-
lections at the Museum, has been proved during the past year, by
their share in the purchase of the Montraorenci panels, as well as



8

b}' the loan of a very A'aluable picture attributed to Holbein, and
of one hundred and forty-four etchings by Jacque, Whistler, and
other etchers.

Gifts of American etchings and wood-cuts to the Museum, by
the artists who made them, also deserve grateful acknowledgment.
Nor should we forget to signalize in the list of donations, elsewhere
reported in detail, such important objects as the twenty-three
Tanagra figurines given by Mr. Appleton ; the precious antique
vase of Oriental alabaster presented by Mr. George B. P^merson ;
the sixty casts of Moorish architectual decoration, and the one
hundred and twenty-six casts of objects in metal, ivor}', etc., from
tlie Bavarian National Museum at Munich, sent bj^ Mrs. and Miss
Brewer ; and lastly, the marble bust of Beethoven, with its richly
decorated bracket, presented by Mrs. W. A. Tappan.

Encouraged b}' such abundant proofs of interest in the enlarge-
ment and prosperity of the Museum, those who have it in charge
may trust in its future ; but lest those who ai'e able and willing to
aid in its growth ma}' withhold their assistance, from a mistaken
idea that the funds at the disposal of the Trustees, applicable to
purchases, correspond to their reasonable desires, it seems proper
to state that the}' are limited to the small sum of $500 a year,
derived from the Everett Statue Fund.

Consideiing the short time which has elapsed since the doors
of the Museum were first opened to the public, and the result
attained, it seems not unreasonable to hope that some of those
who took part in its modest beginnings, may live to see the build-
ing completed according to the original plan, and well filled in
ever}- part with objects of value and interest.
For the Committee,

CHARLES C. PERKINS,

Chairman.
Jaxuahv 15, 1880.



EEPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE LIBRARY.



Museum of Fine Arts, January, 18S0.

The Committee on the Library have held several meetings, and
have made read}^ to occiip}' the Librar}- Room as soon as it can
conveniently be put into their hands. This will now be done with-
in a few days. The}" have arranged to furnish the room with a
large librar}^ table and with suitable chairs, and to move into it the
bookcase now in the Curator's room, furnishing him instead with
a small bookcase for such books as he has in daily use. A proper
list of the books owned by the Museum is in' course of preparation,
and also a list of such books of reference and other works as are
needed by the Curator and other officers of the Museum to assist
them in the conduct of its affairs. When these lists are completed
they will be laid before the Trustees.

The appointment of a Librarian, and the framing of rules for the
conduct of the Librar3', are duties which the Committee have de-
ferred until experience of the new room shall show what rules are
needed, and how much occasion there will be for service of admin-
istration. Meanwhile the keys of the bookcases will remain in
the hands of the Curator. But the Library room will remain open,
and the several schools established at the Museum have been
invited to keep their own books there, in their own bookcases,
and under such regulations as the}^ may frame, and as may be ap-
proved b}'' this Committee.

The money already voted by the Trustees will suffice to furnish
the room, and to defray all the expenses the Committee now con-
template. They do not at present, accordingly, ask for any addi-
tional appropriation.

For the Committee,

HENRY B. ROGERS,

Chairman.
Boston, Jan. 15, 1880.



10



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DONATIONS IN 1879.



AMKRtCAX Art Review, through S. R. Koehler, editor.

Five etchings, pro )fs ; three wood eugraviugs, proofs.
A. V. S. Anthony.

Wood eugraving, proof, by A. V. S. Authouy, and one by W. H. Morse.

Tiios. G. Appleton.
Twenty-three statuettes in terra-cotta, from Tanagra, Greece ; two
specimens bronze glass.
W. S. Baker, Philadelphia.

Three engravings, proofs, head of Washington by H. Wright Smith,
after Stuart.

E. D. BoiT, Jr.

Oil paindng and drawing in India ink by F. L. Frangais.
Mrs and Miss Brewer.

Sixty casts from Moorish architecture in Algeria; one hundred and
twenty-six casts of metal work, ivories, and wood carving from the
Museums at Munich, Nuremberg, etc. A series of photographs,
ninety-four in number, chiefly metal work from the Bavarian National
Museum, in Munich; twenty-two photographs of rare engravings and
drawings of the old masters; thirty-six photographs from the Exposi-
tion of art in Munich, 1876 ; fourteen photographs metal work in the
National Museum in Augsburg; the alphabet by Meister E. S., 1466;
eight photographs, chiefly metal work in the Museum of Nuremberg ;
ei<^hteen photographs of objects in the Museum of Industrial Art in
Milan. In all, two hundred and fifteen sheets.
T. Cole, Bath, New Utrecht, L. I.

Three proof wood-cuts by himself.
Corcoran Muskum op Art, Washington, D. C.
Thirty-eight photographs of objects in that museum.

Benj. R. Curtis.
Armor of a Japanese color-bearer.

F. X. Dengler, Covington, Ky.

Nine plaster casts, the works of the late Frank Dengler.
Gkorge B. Emerson.

Vase of Oriental alabaster, fron a Roman tomb.
Geo. W. Fenkty, Chelsea, Mass.

Two pieces of pottery.
Mrs. E. W. Hokton.

Piece gold-lacc, Frciicli.



13

Mrs. S. L. Howe, Salera, Mass.

Teu paiutiugs ou rice paper, Chinese.
Mrs. J. "W. James.

Suit of armor, reproduction of that worn by Henri II. of France.
F S. King, Greenville, N. J.

Proof wood-cut.
G. Krueix, Jersey City, N. J.

Wood engraving, proof.

ClIAS G. LOKING.

Three proofs, etchings by E, Swain Gifford and J. D. Smillie ; pot,
modern, Pueblo manufacture; eighteen specimens Japanese paper.
W. J. Linton, New Haven, Conn.

Twenty wood engravings, proofs.
Miss Susan I. Minot.

Two portraits by Trumbull.
Oliver W. Peabody.

Two Japanese screens of the seventeenth century.
M, D. Eoss.

Cast of the Faun in the Tribune at Florence.
Prof. B. G. Salisbury, New Haven, Conn.

Block of red porphyritic granite from Lyme, Conn.
S. A. ScHOFF, Newtouville, Mass.

Line engraving, proof; portrait of R W. Emerson, after Eowse.
School of Art Needlework

Piece of embroidery designed by John H. Sturgis.
Jamks D Smillie, New York.

Proof etching.

Miss H.-\NNAH STEVE]SfSON.

Cup and saucer, Sevres.
John H. Sturgis.

Block of limestone with a figure of Horus, from Thebes.
Mrs. W. a. Tappan.

Bust of Beethoven, in marble, with decorative bracket by W. Matthise.
George W. Wales.

Two pieces modern majolica; Persian bowl, brass inlaid with silver.
Mrs. Wm. G. Weld.

Piece of embroidery.
Andrew C. Wheelwright.

Vase, modelled by Frank Dengier.



DONATIONS TO THE LIBRARY 1879.



Mrs. Sarah Bkadford.

Seveu vols. Italian works on Art.
Du. James R. Ciiadwick.

Cabinet ties Siugularitez d' Architecture, etc. Paris: 1699. Three vols.
Miss M. F. Curtis.

Five copies "Tanagra Figurines."
Chas. H. Hart, Philadelphia.

"Turner, the Dream Painter" A review.
Librarian Harvard Collegb;.

List of the principal books relating to the life and works of Michelan-
gelo, with notes by Chas. Eliot Norton.
Harvard Art Club.

J. T. Clai'ke, "The Hypgethral Question."
E. W. Hooper.

"Outlines and Sketches," by W. AUston.
Chas. G. Loring.

De' L'Orfevrerie, " Notice des Emaux," museum of the Louvre.


1 2 3 5

Online LibraryG. & C. Merriam CompanyHave we a national standard of English lexicography? or, Some comparison of the claims of Webster's dictionaries, and Worcester's dictionaries → online text (page 5 of 6)