G. b.1789 Hamonière.

The beauties of the Spectator, Tatler, and Guardian,= Beautés du Spectateur, du Babillard et du Tuteur online

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4 - > .> .-



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^Z2



THE BEAUTIES

OF THE

SPECTATOR, TATLER ATO GUARDIAN.



V«^M%^/W\^V



BEAUTES



DU



SPECTATEUR, DU BABUJARD
ET T)V TUTEUR.



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I



THE BEAUTIES

OF THE

SPECTATOR, TATLER
AND GUARDIAN,

BY

ADDISON, STEELE,

AND OTHER EMINENT WRITERS;
OR,

A GOLIjECTION
Of the most /Valuable Pieces,

SELECTED FBOU TBOSE CEI^KATXD WOBKS,

By G. HAMOHltRE.

VOL. I.



PARIS :

SOLD BY XaEOPHIIiUS BARROIS, JUNIOR^ FOREIGIT B00K9ELLSR,
QUAI VOLTAIRE, N°. 11.



1819.



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BEAUTES



DU



SPECTATEUR, DU BABILLARD
ET DU TUTEUR,

PAR

Al]fDtiON,* STEELE,

ET AUTKES.ECRIVAIHS PISTINGU^S J

ou . • .

RECUEIL

Des Morceaux lesplus interessans)

SXTRArrS pE CES TBOIS OTJ^KAOES,

Pak G. HAMOl^ltKE.



VOL. I.
PARIS:

CHEZ TH^OPRILB BA&ROIS, TILS, LIBRAIILB POUa L£3
LAHOVSa ^TflLAlTGiaZS VJnrAXTES, QUAI 70LTAIKB, K.<' 11.



1819.



I



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AVIS DU IJBRAIRE.



Je pr^yiens qu'6tant proprietaire du manuscrit
de cet ouyrage , et ayant d^pos^ les exemplaires
Toulns par la loi^ je poursuiyrai ayec la plus
grande rigaeur tout conlre&deur et tout d^bi-
tant d'^dition contre&ite. J'abandonnerai k celui
qui me les fera connoitre la moiti^ des pommages
et inter^ts accordes paries lois.

InkovnuJB BabboiS; Fu.s.



Printed by I. Smitti, roe Montmorenqr*



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ADVERTISEMENT.
AVERTI8SEMENT.



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ADVERTISEMENT.



*^%^0^f\^%,l%^/*f



The Sudatory TcUler and Guardtan^ are titles
giren by Steele and Addison to Essays published
by tbem under the form of Periodical Papers or
Journals. The Tatkr^ conducted exclusiyely by
Steele^ was begun in 1709; Addison and Swift
sometimes inserted in it a few articles. This work
was published three iiqaes a week> .and ceased at
the commencement of 1710^ but was soon after
replaced by the Spectator, published jointly by
Addison and Steele^ assisted by several of their
£nends, and particularly by two of them> Budgell
and Hughes> who enriched the work with seyeral
interesting essays. The Spectator appeared daily
from 1710 till 1714^ and it was about the year
1713^ that the same authors published the Guar^
dian, in which are to be found several papers
written by Pope.



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AVERTISSEMENT.



A^^iVV^^'V^



IjR SpectaUur f le Babillard et le Tuieur, tels
8ont les titres sous lesquels Steele et Addison ont
pabii^^ pendant plosieors anntes , difierens Merits
qui paroissoient sous la forme de journanx. LeBa-
hillard fut •entrepris en 1709 par Steele^ qui j
trayailia seal ; Addison et Smft 7 ins^iirent seu-
lement ^ dfi temps k autre y quelques articles. Ce
journal y qui paroissoit trois fois par semaine.^
cessa aa commencement de 1710 *, mais il fat
l>ient6t remplac6 par le Spectauur , puUi^ en
commun par Addison et Steele, de concert ayet
qnelqueiHuiis de leurs ttmis> entre antrea. Bai^eH
et Hughes^ qni Fenricliirent de plnsieurs essais
interessans*.Le Speciateur parut tons les jours
deputs i7iO}usqu'en 1714, et ce fut rers 1713 que
les mdmes auteurs pubUerent le Ihiieur, dans
lequel se tronyent quelques airticles foumis par
Pope.



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TIU ADVERTISEltfJBNT.

The Tailer being a political and literary work,
has been justly accased with partiality^ and^ al-
thoagh it conuins seTeral exc^ent essays^ it is
mostly made up of pieces of a temporary interest^
and often written in an incorrect style. The Spec-
tator, on the contrary^ being a moral and literary
publication^ is EUed with articles of general inte-
rest, and its style yies in elegance and correctness
with the most celebrated literary productions; in
this work; Steele and Addison dbplayed their
greatest talents. A remarkable peculiarity in the
Spectator \s, that although published at an epoch
when licentiousness of manners was carried to its
highest pitch, and when party spirit diyided fami-
lies and every branch and class of society, it was
the oidy work of the kind which was not sullied
by the spirit of the times^ but which, on the
comrary, contained a great number of papers,
lending to encourage the practice of social yirtues,
and the diffusion amongst mankind of those prin^
cipiies of moderation and mutual goodwill, which
are the source of all our efforts for the public
weal. The intentions of the authors do honour



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AVERTISSEMBNT. ix

Jje Babillardy k la fois journal politique et Klt^-
rairC; nitrite &n g^u^ral le reproche de partiality ;
et/qaoiqu^il contienne de tr^s-bons arlicAet , il se
compose en grande partie de morceauxd'an interit
momentan^y dontle style est sourent incorrect. Le
Spectdteur, an contraire, journal puretnent moral
et liiiiraire, est remplid'une fonle de morceaux
d'un int^r^tg^n^ral^ et le stjie en est anssi cor-
rect que celoi des meilleurs ouvrages de litt^ra-
ture ; c'est la que Steele et Addison ont d^ploy6
tous leurs mojens: Get ouvrage offre d'ailleurs
une particularity remarquable : c'est qu'ayant
paru dans un temps ou la licence des mceurs 6toit
port^e a Vexttifeme , et oii l*esprit de parli di^isoit
les familles'et toutes les clashes de la 80ci6l6 , il
est le seul ouvrage de ce genre qiii n'en aiC pas
et^ enfach^^ 6t il renferme an grand nombre
d'^articles tendant a encourager la pratique des
Tertus sociales, et a propager parmi les bommes
ces sentimens de moderation et de bienveillance
mutueUe , qui sont la source de I'amour du bien
public. Le but des anteurs fait bonneur k leur



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X ADVERTISEMENT,

to iheir characters^ and we may judge of the in-
flueuce their writings had on tbeir countrymen,
when we are assured^ that the daily s^le of the.
work amounted lo twenty thousand copiea. The
Guardian is, in some sort, a continuation of the
Spectator, and although of less importance and
celebrity, equally contains several well written
papers.

The selection now offered to the public unites
the most interesting pieces, chosen out of twelve
or fifteen Tolumes, which form the entire collec-
tion of the three works aboye-mentioned. Several
selections, on the same plan^ have been already
published in England and France; but our great
aim having been to select such pieces only as
are amusingi and of which several have, as it
were^ the attraction of novelty, and temporary
a-propos, we doubt not that the present work will
be preferred to those which have pre/ceded it.



^^V«V%/«b«'VW««%!»VWWw



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AVERTISSEMENT. xi

caracl^re^ et Ton jugera quelle influence leui* ou*
yrage a dA avoil: sur V.espril de leu^s compatriotes ,
si^ comme on I'assure , 11 s'en d^bitoit ]a«qa'^ Tingt
mille exemplaires par jour. Le Tuteur est y en
quelque sorle , una suite da Spectateur; et , quoi-
que ce soit un ourrage moins important ei moins
r^panda y il renferme ^galement des morceaux
bien pens^s et bien Merits.

Le recueil que nous offrons au public reunit
les morceaux les plus inl^ressans y epars dans les
douze ou quinze yolumes qui forment la collection
des trois ouyrages dont nous yenons de parler.
II a ddja ete public , sous difii^rens litres ^ tant en
Angleterre qu'en France , plusieurs rccueils du
m£me genre \ mais le soin qioie nous ayons eu de
ne £aire entri*r dans celui-ci qnt des morceaux
d'une lecture agr^able^ dont plasieurs ont encor^^
pour ainsi dire ^ I'attrait de la nouyeaut^ , et
quelques-uns mimePi-propos de la circonstance,
le. fera sans, doute distinguer de cenz qui l'on:t



i-



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THE BEAUTIES



or



THE SPECTATOR.



Portrait of the Author.

I HATE observed, that a reader seldom peruses
a book i¥ith pleasure, till be knows whether the
writer of it be a black or a fair man, married or a
. bachelor, of a mild or choleric disposition, with
other particulars of the like natui^e, that conduce
very much to the right understanding of an author.
To gratify this curiosity, which is so natural to a
reader, I design this paper and my next, as prefisi-
tory discourses to my following writings, and shall
give some account in them of the several persons
that are engaged in this work. As the chief trouble
of compiling, digesting, and correcting will fall to
my share, I must do myself the justice to open the
work with my own history.



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BEAUTES



DU



SPECTATEUR.



Portrait de VAuteur-^

J 'AI toujours ol)serv6 qa'on ne parcourt gu^res
un livre ayec plaisir^ a moins qu'on ne sacbe si
Pautear est noir ou blond > marie ou c6Ubataire,
d^un caract^re doux oa yioleat , et quelques aatres
particularit^s semblabJes^ gai aidant beaucoup a
I'intelligence parfaite de ce gu'il ecrit. Pour sa-
tisfaire cette curiosite si naturelle a un lecteur, je
destinerai cette feaille et la suivante ar seryir de
discours prellminaire ^ cet outrage ^ el ^ donner!
nne l^gfcre idee de plusieurs personnes qui y par-
ticipent. Mais comme je dois avoir la pliis grande
parlie du soin d'en ramasser^ dig^rer et cbrriger
tous les materlaux', il est juste que mon Uistoirc
passe la premiere.



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4 BEAUTIES OF THE SPECTATOR.

I was born to a small hereditary estate, which,
according to the tratltlion of the. yillage where it
lies, was booaded hf theiaiiie badges and ditches
in William the Conqueror's time that it is at pre-
scDt, and has been delivered down from father to
son, whole and entire, witliout the loss or acqui*
81 lion of a single Geld or meadow, daring the
space of six hundred years. There rung a story in
the family, that when my mother was gone with
child of me about three months, she dreamt that
she was brought to bed of a judge. Whether this
might proceed from a law-suit which was then de-
pending in the family, or my father's being a jus-
tice of the peace, I cannot determine; for I am not
so vain as to think it presaged any dignity that I
should arrive at in my futtire life, though that was
the interpretation which the neighbourhood put
upon it. iChe gravity of my behaviour at my
very first Appearance in the world, and at the
time that 1 sucled, seemed to favour my mo-
ther's dream: for, as she has often told me, I
thrfew away my rattle before I was two months
old, and would not make use of my coral until they
had taken avf^ay the bells from it.

As for the rest of my infancy, there being no-
thing in it ^markahle, I shall pass it over in si -
lence*. X^nd^ that diiring my i\onage^ I had the
reputation of a very sullen youth, but was always
a favourite of my schoolmaster; who used to say,



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BEAtJT]£» DU SPECTATEUA, 3

Meaancfttres m'oni iaiss6 un petit bieo^foiicbiqiii^
Boiyantla tradition daTHlagieouiiestfiito^i ^toiten«
yironn^, dtt temps deGaiUaume<le<!oiM|a^raiit|de9
mdmes haies et des memos fossds. qui TeaTiiroiuieni
aujourd'huiy et qui a pas$e> de fhre en €\s, toat
entier^ sans qp^on y ait ajoutd on qu'on en ait re-
tranche un poHce de terre> pendant I^espace de
six cents ans. On raconte dans ma faraille q^ie ma
mire, lorsqu'elle etait enceinte de moi d'environ
trois mois , r^Ta qu'elle ^lait accoacfa^e d'uu jage«
Si cette pensee lui Tint a I'occasion d'un procef
que mon p^ ayait alors, on de ce qa'H etait lui-
m^mejuge de pati| c'estce que je nesaurals de^*
t;ider; mais je n'ai pas la yanite de croire que cela
me pr^sage^t use dignity dans- lat robe> quoique
ee Mt I'explieation que tout le voisinage en donna*
Mon air grave et serieux p a Vinstant ou je yis le
^onr ^et pendant tout le temps que )e fus k la ma^
melloi sembla confirmer ;le r^ye de ma mhre}
car je lui ai sourent odt d§rf:^it'ajant k peine deux
mois , je ne pouyais souflTi'ir j^on joueti ni meservir
dtt jnorceau dexsorail qa'il j atait au boix^^ a moins
qu'on n'en dtit lesgrelots*

Pour le reste de mon enf^noOi il n^ eat rkn de
remarquaUe; ainsije nW pisrlerai pas. Durant
mon bas Age, on tronra que j'^tais d'une humeur
Ibrt sombre; ee qai n'emp^bait pas que je ne
fcsse ieujourK le &?ort de oaoa maHre^ qm ayait



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6 BEAUTIES OF THE SPECTATOR.
^ ihat my p^ls were solid, and would wear well/
I had not been long at the University^ before I dis-
tinguished myself by a most profound silence; for
daring the «pace of eight years^ excepting in the
public exercises of the college^ I scarce uttered the
quantity of an hundred words; and indeed do not
remember that I ever spoke three sentences to-
gether in my whole life. Whilst I was in this
learned body> I applied myself witb so much dili-
gence to my studies, that there are very few cele-
brated books, either in the learned or the modern
tongues, which I am not acquainted with.

Upon the deatb of my father, I was resolved to
travel into foreign countries, and therefore left the
University, with the character of an odd unac-
countable fellow, that had a great deal of learning,
if I would but shew it. An insatiable thirst after
knowledge carried me into all the countries of
Europe, in which there was any thing new or
strange to be seen ; nay, to such a degree was my
curiosity raised, that having read the controversies
of some great men concerning the antiquities of
Egypt, I made a voyage to Grand Cairo, on pur-
pose to take the measure of a pyramid; and as
soon as I had set myself right in that particular^
returned to my native country with great satis-
faction.

I have passed my latter years in this city, where
1 am frequently seen in most public places, though



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fiEAtJTKS I)U SPECTATBUR. 7

coalume de dire que j'avais du solide/ et que mes
talens seraient durables. Co ne m'eut pas plus t6t
enyoy^ a I'UniTersile , que }e in'y distingnai par
un tr^s-profond sileace ) car^ dansle cours deliuit-
annees, si I'on en excepte les exerc4ces publics^ je
Mchai a peine une centaine de mots^ et je ne crois
pas avoir jamais en ma vie prononce trois periodes
de suite* Quoi qu'il en soit, je m'appliquai avec
tant d'ardenra I'^tude, pendant que je fus an milieu
de cet illuslre corps, que dans les langues an-
ciennes ou modernes 11 y a tres-peu debonsliTres
que je ne connaisse. -*

Apr^s la mort de mon pere, )e formal le
dessein de voyager en pays Stranger. C'est pour-
quoi je sortis de rUnirersite, avec la reputation
d'un homme bizarre , qui ne manquait pas de sa-
▼oir , mais qui ne voulait pas le d^couvrir. L'ar-
denr insatiable que j'avais pour acqu^rir tous les
jours de nouvelles connaissances ^ me Qtparcourir
tons les pays de I'Europe^ ou il y avail quelque
cbose de curieux ou d'extraordinaire a voir. 31a
curiosity alia meme si loin y .qu'apres avoir lu les
disputes de quelques savans sur les antiqnites de
TEgypte , je lis un voyage expris au Grand-Caire
pour y mesurer une pyramide ; et^ aussitot que j'eus
redress^ mes idees la-dessus^ je retouroai dans
m.a patrie avec la plus gratide satisfactiQn.

II y a d6ja quelques ann^es que je reside k
Londres, ou I'on me voit souvent dans lesendrolts



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B BBiLUTIJBS OF THE SPECTATOR,
there are not above half-a-^ozen of my select
friends that know me ; of wliom my next paper
•WU gWe a more particular account. There is no
place of general i«sort wherein I do not often
■aake my appearance ; sometimes I am seen thrust*
ing my head into a round of politicians at Wilfs^
and listening with great attention to the narra-
tifCf that are made in those little circular au-
diences. Sometunes I smole a pipe at Child's, and
whife I seem attentive t^ nothtng but the Post-
man, OTcrhear the conversation of every table in
the rootn. I appear on Sunday nights at St. JamesV
cofiee*hoose^ and sometimes join the little com-
mittee of politics in the inner-room , as one who
comes there to hear and improve. My face is
likewise rery well known at the Grecian, the Co-
eoa*tree> and in the theatres both of Drury-lane
and the Hay-market,. I have been taken for a
merchant upon the exchange for above these ten
years, and sometimes pass for a Jew in the as-
sembly of stock-jobbers at Jonathan's. In short,,
wherever I see a cli^ter of people, I always mix
with them, though i never open my lips but in
my own olub.

Thus I live in the world rather as a spectator of
mankind than as one of the species, by which
means I have made myself a speculative statesman,,
soldier^ merchant, and artisan, without ever med-



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]&£AOTES BU Sl^BCTATEUK. Q

les plus fr^quentis de la v3le , i[}xwpe jc ne 6oi3
connu que d'uae iew-^iuaine dfi 3>oiisami«i
dont je Yons parlei lu «a ^n ea i^il d*iv W
feuiUe suiTf^Dte. 11 a'y a poiat de readez-fesa
public oii ye n0 vf^ tnouve. QnriqoBfiMg )e me
^lifige au raiUen d'an cenole de p^Uliquei d^ns lo
caf^ "Will, et }'^eoute avoc noe g rande aftteoliou
tout ce qui ie dit dans oeafietfAeiaflieiDbl^es. Qa«lr
^uefois je fuoe une fip« au eaft Child; et, pear
dant que je ne Mmbk occupy qu^a la laetwne d«
Postman 9 {« piH^te I'oreiUe auK courersations qui
out lieu a toutes lea tables. Le dkuanobe au soir ,
je parais au caf^ de St.-James , et qneilqnefoia )f
m'y joins au petit comit^ de politiqnes qui s'as-
semblent dans la chambreint^rieure, comme un
simple auditeuv, qui ne pense qu'li profiter de
lenrs aris. Moa visage eat igakmeni bieu oouna
j8(u ea{^ Grec, a celui de Cocoa^tree , et an^ deiu
ibeAtres de Drury4aiKie , et de Hay^mafket. 11 f
a plus de dis &b« qu'on lue pread k la bourse pour
jin n^gociaiit^ et }e passe qi]elqnefi>i3 pour Jutf
dans TassemU^e dea agioleurs au cafe Joaa^
than. Partout ^ en un mot , ok jo Tois uu peleton
de monde , je m'y fourre , quoique je n^ouvre
jamais la boucbe que daiu ma soci^i.

Je yis aind dans le mpnde^ pkit6t ceaime urn
epectateur du genre bum^iu , que couMxve un iu-^
dividtt de la B»&me eapkse ; de sc»*te que )e suia
iJere^u^ ea th&>rie , poliUquey ^oldat, narcband ei



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yo BEAUTIES OP THE SPECTATOR.

diiDg wilh any practical part in life. I am yerj
well versed in the theory of a husband^ or a father,
and can discern the errors in the economy, busi-
ness> and diyiersion of others, better than those
who are engaged in them ; as standers-by discover
blols, which are apt to escape those who are in the
game. I never espoused any party with violence,
and am resolved to observe an exact neutrality be*
tween the Whigs and Tories, unless I shall be
forced to declare myself by the hostilities of either
side, lii sho^t, I have acted in all parts of my life
as a looker-on, which is the character I intend to
preserve in this paper.



I have given the reader just so much of ray bis^
tory and character, as to let him see I am not al-
together unqualified for the business I have un-
dertaken. As for other particulars in my life and
adventures, I shall insert them in following- pa-
pers, as I shall see occasion. In the mean time,
when 1 consider how much I have seen, read, and
heard, I begin to blame my own taciturnity y and
since 1 have, neither time nor inclination to com-
municate the fulness of my heart in speech, I am .
resolved to do it in writing, and to print myself
out, if possible, before I die. I have been often
told by my friends, that it is a pity so many useftii



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BXlAtTTiiS BU SPECTATEUR. 11

artisan y 9aus m'etre jamais mele de la pratique.
Je connais trfes-bien les deToirs d'uQ mart ou
d'un pere, et je puis discemer les fautes qai se
coramettent dans le manage, les affaires el les
diyertisemens des particaliers^ mleux que les
personnes m^mes qui s'y trouyent engag^es*, a
pea pr^s comme ceux qui n'etant point interess^s
au ]ea, remarquent les JbeTues qai ^cbappent a
I'at ten tion des joueurs. Je n'ai jamais epouse les
int^rdts d'aucun parti ayec beauconp de chaleur ,
et }e suis r^solu d' observer nne exacle neutrality
entre les Whigs et les Toris , 2i moins que les hosti-
lit^s des uns ou des autres ne me forcent a me
declarer. £n unmot/j'ai agi toute ma yie en ob*
seryateur^ et c'est.le caractere qae je pretends
soutenir dans cet ouyrage.

Ce que je yiens de dire sar mon cliapitre^
suffit pour cony aincre mes iecteurs que je ne suis
pas tout-a-fail incapa}>le de Vouyrage que j'ai eii-
trepris. Pour ce qui regarde un plus long detail
de ma yie et ie mes ayentures^ je \e comrauni-
querai au public , a mesure que I'occasion s'en
presentera. D'un autre cdt^ ; loraque je r^ilechis
sur tout ce que j'ai yu , lu et entendu ^ je d^sap-
prouye mon bumeur taciturne^ et , puisque je n- ai
ni le loisir ni rinclination de commoniquer de
Viye yo]3( tout ce qui me roule dans Pesprit , je
suis r^solu de le mettre sur le papier^ et de me
faire imprimer tout entier , s'il est possible ; ayant



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12 BEAUTIES OP THE SPECTATOR.

dtaooTeries wkicb I karc wide should ba (« fos-
9e9sioo of A siieat men. For this reason^ tkerefbrej
I shall publisii a sbeet-fuU of iboaglits every
moruogy for the benefit of my contenperaries ^
aod if [ can any way oontribute to the diTersioii
or unproTemeofc of the coomtry in -which I liTe, I
shall leave it wben I am tmnmoaed out of it, -with
the sc(cnei sati^faetion of thliikiiig that I have
not lived in vain*

There are three very material points vrbieh I
have aotspoken loia ibis paper; and whloh^ forse*
veral importaol reasons^ I nanst keep to myself^ at
leaat fi>r some time c I meaa^ an aecount of my
name, my age, and my lodgings. I must confess^
I would gratify my reader in any thing that is
reasonable; but as for these three partieulars,
though I am sensible they might tend very much


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Online LibraryG. b.1789 HamonièreThe beauties of the Spectator, Tatler, and Guardian,= Beautés du Spectateur, du Babillard et du Tuteur → online text (page 1 of 21)