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G. Drysdale (George Drysdale) Dempsey.

Tubular and other iron girder bridges, particularly describing the Britannia and Conway tubular bridges; with a sketch of iron bridges and illustrations of the application of malleable iron to the art of bridge-building. With wood engravings online

. (page 4 of 13)
Online LibraryG. Drysdale (George Drysdale) DempseyTubular and other iron girder bridges, particularly describing the Britannia and Conway tubular bridges; with a sketch of iron bridges and illustrations of the application of malleable iron to the art of bridge-building. With wood engravings → online text (page 4 of 13)
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salt, that such events as sending away the people
were only calculated to provoke mutiny. He,
however, after a time, went on his way to Ba-
reilly, and the ladies and Dr. Butler ptu^ued their



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TwfiNtY-ONE Y^ARS IN InDIA. 7I

retreat to the refuge in the mountains, which was
to serve them so well in the months to come.

For two weeks everything remained quiet,
and many were sure the danger had passed, if,
indeed, there had been any. During this period,
Colonel Troop was the subject of much ridicule.
Monday morning, June ist, the usual mails did
not arrive, and much alarm was felt on its ac-
count. The next morning one and another of the
officers began to arrive, many of them without
hats or coats, and all more dead than alive. So
the storm had actually burst at last.

On Sunday morning, May 31st, the sepoys
mutinied, and fired on their officers; the first to
fall was Colonel Sibbald, the commanding officer.
Colonel Troop was dressing for church, when one
of his servants rushed in and told him to flee as
the mutineers were at the front door arranging
to set fire to the dwelling. His faithful Sais,
groom, had hastily saddled his horse and had him
at the rear of his house; he mounted and made
his way round the eastern end of the city and
took the road to Naini Tal, where he at length



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73 TwENTY-ON^ Years in India.

arrived in safety. He told me that during the in-
terval of quiet, before the outbreak occurred, one
of the ladies wrote an article for one of the Eng-
lish papers, severely criticising him, and in some
strange way it came back to Naini Tal some
months afterward, while they were shut up there.
The lady who wrote it came to him and, with
tears, apologized. He begged her not to give her-
self a moment's distress, that it was God's way
of sending them deliverance from an awful death.
Dr. Butler and Mr. Pierce preached for some
of the regiments stationed at Bareilly, and ar-
ranged with the two Presbyterian chaplains, one
of the Forty-second, and the other of the Ninety-
third Highlanders, for me to come down and take
their duties for a month and give them a change
and rest for this time. They had been at the
taking of Lucknow and on the campaign that
followed, ending with the taking of Bareilly, and
all through the hot season that followed, so they
much needed rest and a change to Naini Tal. I
was very glad to relieve them, as it would give
me an opportunity to look the ground over and



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TwENTY-ON^ Y^ARS IN India. 73

see what could be done towards opening our
work in that place. This was to be my station,
as soon as we could make a beginning. I had
quarters in the officers' mess-house of the Forty-
second Regiment.

On my first Sunday I had four services to
conduct. Our good friend, Colonel Troop, took
me in his carriage around to each place where
service was to be held, and made me acquainted
with the routine of duties I was to perform, and
introduced me to the officers commanding the dif-
ferent regiments with which I was expected to
hold service. The last service of the day was held
on the parade ground just as the sun was setting.
The regiment was formed up as a hollow square,
with one side open. Here I stood with a drum
for my pulpit, the colonel of the regiment and
other mounted officers standing about me. I ad-
dressed them and felt that much of the Divine
presence attended us, and I think many felt it
good to be there. Many years afterward my
friend, then General Troop, told me that that
regiment was at that time without a chaplain.



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74 Tw^NTY-ON^ Y^ARS IN InDIA,

and that a petition was sent in for my appoint-
ment as such. This, he said, is something you
never knew of, nor had I ever heard of such a
thing. While I was in Bareilly, Dr. Butler re-
turned from Lucknow, and I had the pleasure of
introducing him to our colonel of the Forty-sec-
ond Regiment, who invited him to dine with the
officers at their mess-room. We were treated
with the greatest respect and courtesy, and I be-
came much attached to several of the officers of
this famous regiment, known as the "Black
Watch."

While here in Bareilly we did what we could
to arrange for the reopening of our work. The
magistrate of Bareilly, Mr. John Inglis, sug-
gested that we should apply to Government for a
place known as Cashmere Kotee, a place five miles
away on the opposite side of the city from can-
tonments, where the military and civil offices are
located. Cashmere Kotee had been a palatial resi-
dence in its day ; it was built by one of the old-
school civilians who had lived there in the style
of a Nawab; but it had long since ceased to be



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Tw^NTY-ON^ Years in India. 75

regarded as a desirable residence on account of
its location, and so had passed into the hands of
a wealthy native, who had joined the mutineers
and had been, executed, and the estate confiscated.
Mr. Inglis proposed that we apply to Govern-
ment for it on a nominal rental, and as it ulti-
mately would be sold at auction, we might bid it
in and obtain it at a very low sum. As there was
a village belonging to the property, it would give
us an annual income of a few hundred rupees and
quite a large quantity of land for building pur-
poses. It was thought it would serve as ad-
mirably for our orphanages, and for our Mis-
sion as a whole. The application was made, and
we could now only wait the action of Government.
Dr. Butler left me and went on his way to Naini
Tal.

It was now arranged for Mr. Parsons to go
down and begin work in Moradabad, while I was
to go to Bareilly as soon as our location could be
secured. As yet we had no reply to our applica-
tion for Cashmere Kotee. Dr. Butler had pur-
chased property as a site for our Mission in Naini



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76 Twenty-one Years in India.

Tal. A fine location was secured, consisting
of several acres of land in a most central place,
well suited for our schools and Church purposes.
There was a house on it, but as the name indi-
cated, the chief value of the location did not con-
sist in the residence; it was very appropriately
called "The Ruins," but with some slight repairs
it made a comfortable home for a good number
of years. A school building was already being
built and nearing completion, and plans had been
prepared for the erection of a Mission church.
Major Ramsey, Commissioner of Kumaon and
Gharwal, who was a warm friend, and had sub-
scribed most liberally for it, laid the comer-stone
one morning in October, after which a hymn was
sung, and a prayer offered, for a special blessing
upon this, our first place of worship erected in
India.

Soon after this event. Dr. Butler, with his
family and Mr. Pierce's, left us to take up their
residence in Lucknow, where Mr. Pierce was at
the time. Joel Janvier, our native minister, ac-
companied them. It was a long and trying jour-
ney, occupying about four days. The custom was



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TWENTY-ON^ Y^ARS IN InDIA. ^^

at that time to travel at night, resting during the
day, and our only way of getting about was by
Dooley Dak. A dooley was a cot with a frame-
work covered with light, coarse cotton cloth ; this
was carried on men's shoulders. Six or eight
men were required to a dooley, with one man to
carry a torch. When a journey was to be made a
man was called from the Bazar who had charge
of this service, under the direction of the magis-
trate of the district. He would bring a book
with him, in which we would write our orders for
bearers, the day and hour we wished to start. The
men would be ready at every Chaukey, about ten
miles, for a change. In this way we could make
a journey of fifty or sixty miles in a night. This
sort of travel is now done away with, the railway
having taken its place. We soon moved into the
mission house, Mr. Knowles and family occupy-
ing one part, while we occupied the other.

I preached my first sermon in Hindustani in
the temporary place of worship made out of the
sheep-house, in September, 1858.

Mr. Knowles and myself made several preach-



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78 Twenty-one Years in India.

ing tours about in different directions. I made
a journey to Almorah and made the acquaintance
of Rev. J. H. Budden, a missionary of the Lon-
don Missionary Society, with whom we had most
pleasant relations for many years. One of his
daughters became the wife of Dr. Gray, of our
Mission, now living in New Jersey. Another
daughter, Miss Anna Budden, is a member of our
Woman's Foreign Missionary Society, and has
done a great work in Eastern Kumaon. A son
of my old friend, Mr. Anson Budden, holds a
high and responsible position under Government
in the educational department. A year before
leaving India, I had the pleasure to attend the
dedication services of a beautiful church, built
through the instrumentality of the children, as a
memorial to their honored father, who labored
very faithfully for more than forty years for the
people of these mountains. Mr. Budden was a
scholarly and able missionary, and a brother
greatly beloved. Our relations were very inti-
mate and delightful for many years. I felt it to
be a great honor to be permitted to preach the
sermon on the occasion of the dedication of this



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Tw^NTY-ON^ Y^ARS IN InDIA. 79

beautiful memorial to a good and noble mission-
ary whom I loved and honored.

To return to my narrative, we conducted a
service on Sunday and once during the week for
European soldiers located at Naini Tal, and vis-
ited the sick in the military hospital.

By the end of the year the walls of the church
were up ready for the roof, and a neat, commo-
dious school building was completed ready for use.
In January we went down to Moradabad, found
Mr. Parsons and family living in a tent pitched
under a magnificent tree with wide extended
boughs, thus affording protection from the chilly
night air and the heat of the sun at mid-day.

We received a very warm welcome, and it
seemed as though we had entered another coun-
try. In Naini Tal it was cold and rough, but
here it was like the end of September or begin-
ning of October. Mr. Parsons had secured the
loan of a tent for us, and we were soon settled in
our canvas home, and greatly enjoyed the change
from the mountains to the plains, and were eager
to begin the work to which we had been so long
looking forward.



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CHAPTER V.

Opening Work in Moradabad and Bareilly.

I HAD gone down to Moradabad at Dr. But-
ler's request, to assist Mr. Parsons to get settled,
while I was waiting for the way to open to go to
Bareilly. We were directed to secure a residence,
either by renting, or purchase. The residences
of the station for the use of Europeans were all
burned in the mutiny ; in most instances the walls
were left standing; only a few of them had been
repaired up to the time we arrived, and these were
occupied by military officers. It seemed, there-
fore, quite impossible to find a place without
building, and that could not be done before the
hot weather would set in, and Mr. and Mrs. Par-
sons could not live in tents at that time. At
length we succeeded in finding a place that might,
we thought, be made habitable with some repair-
ing. We at once secured the place and set about

80



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TwenTy-on^ Ykars in India. 8i

making the necessary repairs. While we were
thus engaged a man came in to see us who lived
about twenty miles out on the road to Garmakh-
teser on the Ganges. He said he represented a
class of people who lived out in that part of the
district, who were called "Mazhibi Sikhs," and
that they all desired to become Christians. The
word "Mazhibi" pertains to religion; strictly it-
means religious, and in their case it meant that
they for some cause had embraced the Sikh re-
ligion. It seems probable that they had been led
by some of their Garus, or teachers, to embrace
the religion of Nanak. This man who came to
us at that time, told us this story, which intensely
interested us. He said that before the mutiny
their Garu, or teacher, heard the missionaries of
Futtigarh preach at a great mela on the Ganges,
just before his death, which occurred during the
time of the mutiny. He told them as well as he
could about what he had heard, and then said,
"Some day, before long, the missionaries will come
to Moradabad, and when you hear that they have
come, go to them and do what they tell you." We
6



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82 Twenty-one Years in India.

were, as can be imagined, thrilled by his story,
and set a day when we would go out and meet
as many as could come together at the village of
Jua, about twenty miles out on the road to the
Ganges. Upon our arrival, on the day appointed,
we found a large number of people assembled and
waiting for us, and eager for instruction as to
what they must do to become Christians. We
saw at once that they were poor and very igno-
rant ; beyond this we knew but very little of them
at that time. We were greatly moved, however,
by their desire to ally themselves to us, and to be
instructed as to what they must do to be saved.
The hours spent with them that day under the
shade of a fine, large tree, will never be forgot-
ten. After speaking to them for some time, we
told them that we would have a season of prayer,
and we explained what it is to pray, and how we
can come to God and speak to Him, and He will
hear us and help us, though we can not see Him.
They all prostrated themselves before God,
after the manner of Orientals, on their faces. I
led in prayer, speaking very slowly and in the



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Twenty-one Years in India. 83

most simple language. I soon noticed that they
were trying to repeat the words after me. I then
proceeded, a single sentence at a time, waiting
for them to repeat it over after me. In this way
they began to learn the language of prayer. Re-
peating it after us helped to fix their attention,
and at the same time teach them the language of
prayer. We afterwards very generally adopted
this method and found it very useful.

Among the children present, I noticed a little
girl who was very fair for a native ; she was really
a beautiful child, very bright and pleasing in her
ways. I saw her grow up to become a very use-
ful and intelligent woman. I taught her medicine,
and she gained great honor in treating the people
for their diseases and showing them what they
must do to be saved. When I went out last,
though very ill and nearing her end, she begged
her friends to bring her to see me. I found her
rejoicing in Christ as her Savior. A few days
later she passed within the veil whither Christ,
who was very precious to her, had gone before.

We had been deeply saddened in the mutiny



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84 Twenty-one Years in India.

days by the cruel death of the missionaries of
Futtigarh, four families massacred on the parade
ground at Cawnpore by order of Nana Sahib,
but now we were reaping the harvest of their
faithful sowing. The truth preached by them,
that may have seemed to fall on very sterile
ground, had sprung up in places little thought of,
and in ways unknown to man. So God takes care
of the seed His servants sow. Not a word spoken,
not a prayer offered, not a tear shed, not a life
given for Him, shall be in vain.

This movement among these people was hailed
by us all with great delight; it was naturally
thought to be of great importance. We were
aware that we had great ignorance to deal with,
and that the motives of these people were mixed
with much that was material and sordid ; but still
it seemed evident that there was much about it
that was hopeful, and that the Holy Spirit was
shedding His blessed light on these dark minds.
So we determined to watch over this movement
and encourage it in every way in our power, and
at the same time be on our guard and not expect



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Twenty-one Years in India. 85

too much on one hand, nor be too suspicious and
doubting on the other. We soon learned that
they did not bear a very good reputation; they
were generally Chaukadars, or watchmen. They
were made such on the principle "that it takes
a thief to catch a thief," or perhaps it is a principle
of honor among thieved in India, not to steal from
those who are under the protection of one of their
own clan. Later, in the history of our work, we
should have been less suspicious, and, perhaps,
baptized them sooner than we did. I was at that
time disinclined to administer the ordinance with-
out some indication of the fact that those to whom
it was administered had some good degree of ap-
preciation of what it all signified.

In India the circumstances are very peculiar,
and baptism has a significance among the people
that it does not have with us, and that it does
not have among any other people in the world.
They may think as they will, and call themselves
by whatever name they please; so long as they
are not baptized their relation to their own people
remains unchanged ; but as soon as baptized, they;



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86 Twenty-one Years in India.

are cut off from their own people and known as
Christians.

To gain this much is an advantage, as it
places them under our care where we can instruct
them without hindrance. A man expresses a de-
sire for Christian baptism ; if sincere, as we must
think him to be until we have some evidence to
the contrary, he shows the work of the Holy
Spirit in his heart, and so justifies the administra-
tion of the ordinance to him. It is not laid down
in the Scriptures how much light a man must
have to be entitled to receive baptism. This, I
think, must be left to the administrator very
largely. It is clear that he must have some
knowledge of sin, and of Christ as a Savior from
it. I think our missionaries in India are sure as
far as this, as to how these cases are to be treated.
A certain degree of knowledge and conviction is
necessary, but people asking baptism should not
be held off too long; but baptizing them, we must
provide for their instruction. Here lies the great
problem to be solved in India to-day, how are we
to provide for the instruction of the masses who



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Twenty-one Years in India. 87

are urgently asking Christian baptism? The
urgency of the case is sure to increase. This re-
sponsibility is upon the Church. Will she meet it?
God grant that she may !

This movement among the Sikhs brought this
subject prominently before us : When may baptism
be properly administered to these people? It
took some years for us to reach a settled conclu-
sion as to the proper mode of procedure in these
cases. It seems to be well settled now in the
minds of our missionaries.

In a few weeks the house we had rented for
Mr. Parsons and family was ready for occupancy,
and they moved in. About this time Dr. Butler
wrote, asking me to meet him in Bareilly, when
we had to make a journey out into the district
of about twenty miles to meet Mr. Inglis to see
if we could come to some agreement as to our
occupying Cashmere Kotee. We found him in
camp, and had a most delightful evening with
him. Here it may be well to explain that Eng-
lish officials spend the most of the cold season,
which lasts from October until March or April,



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88 Twenty-one Years in India.

out in camp, living in tents and moving about
among the people. They spend usually a day or
two in a place, then moving on to another lo-
cality. They, in this way, become acquainted
with the condition and needs of the people, hear
their complaints, settle their disputes, and save a
great deal of litigation in the courts, and conse-
quently expense and trouble. This kind of ad-
ministration accords with the ideas of the people.
I have seen officers settle cases in five minutes on
the ground, among the people, that would have
taken months to settle in the courts in the usual
way, and save the parties a great amount of
travel, expense, and worry. The Government re-
quires officers to be out among the people in this
way nearly all the cold weather, and makes an
extra allowance to them to meet expenses in-
volved. It is most delightful in camp in India
during the cold season. The weather is almost
uniformly pleasant and not so cold as to be un-
pleasant. Missionaries, as a rule, spend as much
of their time in this way as possible, and find it
exceedingly profitable. Many of our native



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TwENTY-ON^ Y^RS IN InDIA. 89

Christians live out in the district, and the mis-
sionaries can only visit them at their homes dur-
ing this season and make the acquaintance of their
heathen neighbors, hold service with them, and
carry the knowledge of Christ to many villages
where it would otherwise not be known.

Itinerating is a very important department of
the work, and if more of it could be done it would
be all the better. The ladies of the Woman's So-
ciety are prosecuting this kind of work nowadays
with much vigor and success.

As a result of our visit to Mr. Inglis, it was
settled that we should proceed and occupy Cash-
mere Kotee, not waiting longer for a reply to
our application to the lieutenant-governor of the
Northwest. Mr. Inglis felt quite safe in assum-
ing that our application would be successful, and
expressed his great pleasure that we were to open
work in Bareilly at once. I returned to Morada-
bad and proceeded to complete arrangements for
removing to Bareilly. In a few days our belong-
ings, in charge of our servants, were on their way
to our new home.



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90 Twenty-one Years in India.

We had a few days before engaged as Khan-
samah, or table servant, a young Mohammedan
named Peer Bakhs. He was the servant of an
English family of our acquaintance in the time
of the mutiny, and was very faithful and true to
them, and did much for them in the way of sav-
ing their property, and in aiding them to make
their escape. He lived with us about twelve years,
and was one of the best and most reliable servants
I have ever known, and we became greatly at-
tached to him. His health failed, so that he could
not live in the climate of the mountains where our
home was, and we were obliged to let him return
to his native place in the plains, where he passed
away in a few years. He never publicly professed
faith in Christ, but I believe he secretly trusted
in Him as our Savior from our sins.

We left on the evening of February 25th, and
arrived at our destination the following morn-
ing. We found what had once been a palatial
residence, in the center of a large plat of ground
surrounded by a ditch and tall Indian grass. The
whole place was sadly run down and desolate in



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I^WENTY-ONE Years in India. 91

the extreme. The walls were blackened and
broken, the roof had fallen in over a considerable
portion of the building, the windows were broken,
and it was generally in a most dilapidated and un-
inviting condition. It had been used by the muti-
neers and by other bodies of native soldierSj^ by
the police, and, last of all, by a company of Euro-
pean soldiers.

It showed unmistakable marks of age, hard
usage, and neglect. We succeeded in making a
room or two habitable; but in the night jackals
roamed at will through it in spite of all we could
do to the contrary, as if contesting our right of
occupancy. Perhaps they did not know of our
arrival, for they never troubled us again. We
learned later, fortunately for us, that the place
was infested with a large and very venomous black
snake. I say fortunately for us, as it was well
that we did not know this at the beginning, as
we had quite enough already to depress and dis-
courage us without this. About one year before
this a crisis came in the history of Bareilly. Two
armies arrived, one from the East under Sir Col-



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9a Twenty-one Years in India.

lin Campbell, the other from the West, known as
General Penney's division, though the general
himself had been killed some days before their
arrival. As this force opened fire on the western
gate of the city. Sir Collin responded on the east
side, and before night these armies fought their
way through the city and met in the grounds of
the Government College. The mutineers were
broken and fleeing with all possible haste away to
the jungles towards Nepal. This, of course,
must mark a crisis in the history of this city and


1 2 4 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Online LibraryG. Drysdale (George Drysdale) DempseyTubular and other iron girder bridges, particularly describing the Britannia and Conway tubular bridges; with a sketch of iron bridges and illustrations of the application of malleable iron to the art of bridge-building. With wood engravings → online text (page 4 of 13)