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G. Drysdale (George Drysdale) Dempsey.

Tubular and other iron girder bridges, particularly describing the Britannia and Conway tubular bridges; with a sketch of iron bridges and illustrations of the application of malleable iron to the art of bridge-building. With wood engravings online

. (page 7 of 13)
Online LibraryG. Drysdale (George Drysdale) DempseyTubular and other iron girder bridges, particularly describing the Britannia and Conway tubular bridges; with a sketch of iron bridges and illustrations of the application of malleable iron to the art of bridge-building. With wood engravings → online text (page 7 of 13)
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The fair one known by Uma*s name ;



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Twenty-one Years in India. 137

Then all the gods in heaven, in need
Of Gunga*s help their vows to speed,
To great Himalaya came, and prayed
The mountain king to yield the maid.
He, not regardless of the weal
Of three worlds, with holy zeal
His daughter to the immortals gave, —
Gunga, whose waters cleanse and save.
Who roams at pleasure, fair and free.
Purging all sinners, to the sea.
The three pathed Gunga thus obtained.
The gods their heavenly homes regained.' **

Giinga Ji, the honorable Ganges, is greatly
loved and enthusiastically worshiped by the
Hindus. Aged and sick people are often taken
to its banks and left there to die. It is r^arded
very meritorious to pass from earth with its
waters in view.

For weeks after this great gathering on the
Ganges, great numbers of men may be seen car-
rying on their shoulders two baskets, one attached
to each end of a pole, filled with bottles of water
from the river, which is carried hundreds of miles,
and is kept in the homes of the better class of
people and used on occasion of ceremony, sick-
ness, and death. It is regarded especially sacred.

The following lines express something of esti-



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138 Tw^NTY-ON^ Y^ARS IN InDIA.

mate the Hindus put upon the value of the water
of the holy Mata Gunga :

" The jewels of Puna are costly and rare,
The silks of Amritsar are matchlessly fair ;
But the waters of Gunga in beauty outvie
All the gems of the earth, all the stars of the sky.

Her fountains are pure as the snows of Kedar,
And her stream, as it flows, no foulness can mar ;
But where Kashi*s high temples eternally shine.
Bach wave is a god, and each drop is divine."

A Striking scene occurred near Hurdwar,
where the Ganges issues from the Himalayas,
April the 8th, 1854. The Government had for
several years been reopening old canals that had
been made by the Mogtds, but had fallen into de-
cay. They were for irrigation only, and were
found to be so very useful that they built a very
fine, large one through the Doab* to receive water
from the Ganges; hoping thus to avert the dis-
astrous famines to which that region is subject.

The Ganges Canal was a vast work, but it was
at last completed and about to be formally opened.
The Hindus all around were greatly excited.
They could not believe that the mighty goddess —

<■ I^nd lying between the two rivers, the Ganges and Jumna.



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l^w^NtY-ONE Years in India. 139

the Mata Gunga — Mother Ganges — ^would allow
any portion of her sacred waters to flow in this
channel made by the hated Faringhis. The
priests assured the people that Gunga Ji would
utterly refuse to flow in this alien channel. She
would not obey the English! More than a half
million of people waited that day on the banks
of the sacred river so dear to their hearts, anx-
iously watching the issue.

The deep wide channel of the canal stretched
straight out into the distance. The great Ganges
rolled majestically on its way towards the south-
em sea. A group of English officials and engi-
neers stood at a point of contact between the two.
No doubts or fears disturbed their minds in re-
gard to what the Ganges might do. They might
have feared an uproar among the people, but they
had to risk that. At a signal given, the obstruc-
tions were removed, and lo! part of the noble
stream flowed into the canal and rolled peace-
fully onward toward the horizon !

Amazement and anguish transfixed the people
for a while! "Would the English indeed subdue



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140 Twenty-one Years in India.

their gods as well as themselves ?" They strained
their eyes, then turned to tell the breathless crowd
to reproach the priests. They waited until it was
fully evident that Gunga Ji had really yielded to
the command of the English; then one terrible
despairing groan burst from their lips, and with
bowed heads and sinking hearts they slowly dis-
persed.

The year was drawing to a close. It had been
a memorable one to us. We had greatly enjoyed
our work, and there had been a very encouraging
advance made in every department of it

A good foundation had been laid, and the
way was now clear and nothing remained but to
go forward and push the work at every point.
It had been a year of trial as well. God gave us a
little one, who was soon taken from us, and my
dear wife had been brought to the point of death,
and for days we watched with intense anxiety.

I can never forget the debt I owe to mission-
ary friends, especially to the first Mrs. Waugh,
who left her home in Bareilly and came, and was
as an angel from heaven to us through all that
time of great trial.



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CHAPTER VIIL

Return to Bareilly and Removal to Shahjehan-
pore.

Our second Annual Meeting was held in the
early part of January, 1861. During the latter
part of i860, and up to the harvest in September
and October, 1861, we suffered much through a
considerable part of the Northwest from famine.
We had a large addition to the numbers in our
orphanages on account of it A large sum of
money was sent out from England to relieve the
sufferings at the time. This was received and
disbursed by the Government, and a portion of it
was invested for the support of orphan children.

For many years we drew on this fund a fixed

sum for each child. At our Annual Meeting I

was returned to Bareilly, and Mr. Knowles was

sent to Budaon in my place. During the year

Dr. Butler had moved from Lucknow to Bareilly.
141



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14^ Twenty-one Years in India.

Cashmere Kotee was found to be very unsuitable
for the prosecution of our work. It was isolated,
far from the city and cantonments, and incon-
venient for our work in many ways. I had urged
a reconsideration of the question of location be-
fore leaving Bareilly. After locating there, I very
soon became convinced that it was not the place
that we needed for our work; but it seemed the
best we could do at the time. Dr. Butler con-
curred with me, and determined to change our
location as soon as a suitable place could be ob-
tained. It was not long before an opportunity
offered to get a site lying between cantonments
on one side, and the city on the other. The posi-
tion was excellent, being convenient for work both
in the English part of the station and among the
natives of the city. This place was immediately
secured and building was begun. In course of
the year, while I was in Budaon, two commodious
Mission houses were completed, and Cashmere
Kotee had been abandoned. This was every way
a wise move. We have had all these years a fine
location, with additions which have since been



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Twenty-one Years in India. 143

made, and the fine property given for the hospital
under the charge of the Woman's Society, by the
Nawab of Rampore adjoining, makes our Mis-
sion premises very complete and valuable. One
of the houses just completed was occupied by Dr.
Butler, the other by Mr. Waugh. My first-work
after arriving in Bareilly was to superintend the
construction of a building for the boys' orphan-
age, and then a residence for myself, which I saw
completed ready for occupancy; but it was not
my forttme to occupy it, as will be explained far-
ther on. At this time the girls' orphanage was in
Lucknow under the charge of Mrs. Pierce.
About two years later, after the death of Mrs.
Pierce, it was removed to Bareilly, and the boys
were removed to Shahjehanpore, where they have
remained up to the present time. These institu-
tions have served a highly useful purpose in our
work. In addition to their humane character in
rescuing suffering and starving children, they
have furnished us many valuable helpers, both
male and female. Some of our most able minis-
ters in our Conference at the present time were



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144 TwENTY-ON^ Years in India.

reared in our orphanage. Dr. Butler made large
plans for these orphanages and expected large
things from them. Perhaps not all has been real-
ized that he hoped for; but enough has been
gained fully to justify the wisdom of his plans.
They have served a grand purpose, and bid fair to
continue to do so for a long time to come.

Our publishing interests began to take shape
about this time, and a beginning was made. A
room was built in connection with the orphanage
building for the press, and work was begun under
the direction of Rev. J. W. Waugh, who was a
practical printer. It was in the plan to teach the
older boys printing, and so make them useful, and
give them a good trade at the same time. This
room built for the press came down in the rains,
which were especially heavy that year, and the
place was flooded as I have never seen it since.
Considerable damage was done to type and mate-
rial collected by Mr. Waugh. From this humble
beginning has grown our large publishing estab-
lishments in Lucknow and Calcutta, which have
done a great work in supplying our mission with



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TwENTY-ON^ Years in India. 145

its literature. We could not then, in our most
sanguine moments, have imagined what we now
see in this, as in nearly every other department
of our great work. We soon began preaching on
regular days, in all the most prominent points in
the city. We arranged a regular weekly plan for
nearly every day in the week except Sunday, in
which work was laid out for every preacher and
helper to do. We arranged a regular plan for
visiting the larger villages about the city within
a radius of five or six miles. This work was car-
ried on with regularity and spirit, and it evidently
made a very strong impression upon the people.
Two years before I had seen the city powerfully
moved on the occasion of the baptism of Zhur-ul-
Haqq. This year I was permitted to see the peo-
ple more generally and more deeply moved on the
occasion of the baptism of a young Hindu gen-
tleman belonging to a high caste family of im-
portance in the city. When preaching on one oc-
casion in one of the large Bazars of the city, I
noticed several well-dressed young men among
our hearers, standing on the outskirts of the
10



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146 Twenty-one Years in India.

crowd listening, when they could not have been
induced to mix with them and come near to us.
I was especially impressed with one of their num-
ber. I thought he was moved, and I was so deeply
impressed that I made a great effort to get to
him after we had finished our speaking. I fol-
lowed him for a considerable distance in the
crowded Bazar, often losing sight of him, and
then catching a glimpse of him again. I finally
came up with him and spoke to him. I think he
was much surprised to be pursued in that way by
me. I was not a little surprised myself that I
should have done so, when I came to think about
it. I merely acted on an impression without stop-
ping to think. I have no doubt that the Spirit of
God led me, as I think the outcome in this case
shows. I asked him how what he had heard im-
pressed him. He replied that he was much in-
terested, and greatly desired to hear more. I in-
vited him to come to our residence and we would
be glad to explain these things to him more fully.
He assured me that he would gladly come, which



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Twenty-one Years in IndiA. 147

he did in the course of a few days. These visits
were continued for two or three months, during
which time he attended our Hindustani services
as steadily as he could. Then he requested me to
baptize him. I deferred it for a time, as I fore-
saw that he would have to meet very bitter per-
secution. He said his wife desired to be baptized
with him, and it was arranged that on a certain
day they should come to the Mission for that pur-
pose. On the day appointed he arrived, though
much past the hour agreed upon, but he was alone,
and with clothes soiled and torn, and bleeding
from blows that had been inflicted upon him by
members of his wife's family. They had taken
his wife from him, carried her back to their home
in the city; in the struggle he succeeded in slip-
ping out of their hands and fled to us for protec-
tion. The next day. Rajah Baijnath, a Hindu
gentleman, called, who was greatly honored by
the English for his stanch loyalty in the time of
the mutiny, and for the aid he had given to Eng-
lish gentlemen and ladies in those dark days, en-



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148 Twenty-one Years in India.

abling them to escape. He was a wealthy banker ;
Government had conferred the title Rajah, which
was equivalent to that of prince, upon him for his
great devotion to Europeans and to the Govern-
ment. He asked that he might be permitted to
take this young man home with him for one night.
He assured me that he would be responsible for
his safety, but assured me that they would do all
they could to turn him from his insane purpose
to become a Christian. The whole city was up in
arms. Before, it was a Mohammedan that proposed
to become a Christian; now it was a Brahmin;
and both Hindus and Mohammedans were in-
tensely excited. This young man consented to go
to the city for the night; he well knew that it
would be a night of fierce trial to him. He re-
quested that we would all pray for him. There
was not much sleep among the native Christians
that were with us that night. The next day he
was returned to us victorious. He said they ar-
gued and threatened by turns, and offered him
large sums of money, and exhausted every device



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Twenty-one Years in India. 149

to lead him to abandon his purpose to become a
Christian, but to no avail. Their chagrin was
very great and their rage knew no bounds. There
were many men armed with lathis — heavy sticks
with lead run about the end, making them a very
dangerous weapon — on the roads about our
premises, evidently ready for mischief, but the
Lord restrained them from acts of violence. The
next evening he was baptized by Dr. Butler, who
happened to be with us just at that time, and by
my request officiated. A day or two afterward,
Ambica Chum's father-in-law called early in the
morning to see him. Not dreaming of violence,
I left them for a few moments, when I heard a
heavy blow and a fall. I rushed out, when Am-
bica was rising from the floor, and blood was
flowing from his head, while his father-in-law was
fleeing like a madman from the compound. I
noticed that he had a short lathi in his hands,
which he was using as a walking stick, and I
thought nothing of it. Natives often carry them
in that way. I was told that after some angry



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150 Twenty-one Years in India.

words he arose, as if to leave, when he turned
and dealt Ambica a murderous blow, saying as he
did so, "I am ready to be hanged for you," show-
ing that murder was in his heart, but fortunately
he was not very seriously hurt. The man being
a somewhat prominent man in the place, as he
was our postmaster, I thought it should not be
allowed to pass unnoticed, so I made complaint
in one of our courts, and he was put under bonds
to keep the peace, and fined the sum of rupees 50,
which was a small punishment for the crime com-
mitted ; but perhaps it was sufficient to serve the
purpose of a deterrent, and that was all we de-
sired.

In the early history of our work we had two
converts from the better classes— one a Moham-
medan, the other a high caste Hindu — ^and these
were the direct fruit of preaching in the Bazars
to the people. It used to be said in those days
that we never could reach any but the most ig-
norant and the lowest among the people by our
preaching. These cases seemed to me an assur-
ance that we might hope to reach the highest, as



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TwENTY-ON^ Years in India. 151

well as the lowest, in this way. It seemed an
expression of God's approval of our methods,
which were:

1. The proclamation of the Gospel message
in its simplicity and power directly to the people
in their own language.

2. We assumed that it was for all people, rich
and poor, high or low, without aistinction.

3. We expected results.

These are essential principles, and lie at the
foundation of all true success in the evangeliza-
tion of the world. This, I believe, to be funda-
mental in the Gospel economy. Of course there
are many ways of preaching, many things that
must be done, that are tributary to the
one great end; but the tendency is for
these to multiply and become absorbing.
Care must be exercised to prevent this.
There may be times when special attention must
be given to special classes ; but still we must not
lose sight of the fact that our mission is to all,
we are to preach the Gospel to every creature.



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152 Twenty-one Years in India.

Our work grew with great rapidity on every
hand, and we were fully absorbed in it. Just at
this time circumstances arose that seemed to make
it necessary for me to remove from Bareilly to
Shahjehanpore. At this early stage of our his-
tory, when opening work in many different places,
and laying the foundation of many different in-
stitutions and departments of work, frequent
changes were unavoidable. This experience fell
to my lot in these early years of the Mission, as I
was one of the first in the field and could better
undertake new work in a new field than one more
recently out from home could. This was to be
regretted, as with a missionary everything de-
pends upon personal influence, and that can not
be acquired without time. We have never ob-
served the time limit in India. I was soon settled
in Shahjehanpore, where I found a g^eat field
and many open doors of usefulness. I found it
necessary to make some changes in the boys'
school which had been opened on the Mission
premises, and to enlarge its scope. I succeeded in



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Twenty-one Years in India. 153

obtaining a commodious building in the Bazar,
and secured some capable teachers, and soon our
attendance rose from about twenty to over one
hundred. We carried on Bazar preaching regu-
larly, as we had done in other places. In the
course of the year several persons were baptized,
and the work grew rapidly upon our hands. I
made several tours of some distance into the coun-
try. In course of one of them I visited Brother
and Sister Parker, while engaged in their at-
tempt to colonize the Sikhs on land in the Tari in
Oudh. A Government official, who had had ex-
perience in such attempts, told me that our effort
would be disastrous, as it proved to be. Most of
the people sent there died of fever. Brother and
Sister Parker narrowly escaped with their lives.
The only way the Tari can be settled is to crowd
the people living on its borders farther on, little
by little. People taken from a distance and
placed in that region will almost certainly perish
from fever during the rainy season. The malaria
of that region is deadly to people not accustomed



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154 'TwiSNTY-ONlS Y^ARS IN InDIA.

to it. While on this tour, I took in Seetapore,
and passed a few days with Brother and Sister
Gracey, preaching in a Mela held there at that
time. While here I met a native doctor who had
served in the native army under Government, but
had now retired on his pension. I learned that
he lived some distance away in the interior. He
was a man of some importance and means, and
seemed to be exerting a good influence on the
people about him. I promised to visit him, which
I did some months afterward. I thought his a
very interesting case, and made an itinerating
tour into the part of the country where he lived
and spent a Sunday with him, and baptized sev-
eral members of his family, among them his
mother, a very aged woman. While here in Shah-
jehanpore, I saw a man who had been carried
away when a child by wolves and reared by them.
I had heard of cases of this kind, but was very
much in doubt about their validity. This person
was found by a hunting party a short time before
the mutiny. They came upon a pack of wolves,



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TwENTY-ONie Years in India. 155

and one of them proved to be this man. He must
have been eighteen years of age at the time. He
was twenty or more when I saw him. The gen-
tleman of whom we rented our school building
gave him an outbuilding in the compound in
which he lived. He was scarcely more than an
animal. He could not talk, and lived like an ani-
mal; he knew enough to hold out his hand for
bakshish, as even monkeys are often trained to
do in India. I saw him often, and can vouch for
the case as being true. I was greatly delighted
to welcome Rev. D. W. Thomas and Mrs.
Thomas from home this year. I had known both
of them at home before their marriage. They
were from the same section of country that I was,
and it was indeed a great delight to meet them
and to have them with me in Shahjehanpore. My
wife was obliged to spend that season in the
mountains, on account of illness, so that it was
special pleasure to have somebody in the house
with me. They were very much occupied in the
study of the language, and were able to do but



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156 Twenty-one Years in India.

little in work at that time, and in September they
were removed to Bareilly to assist Dr. Butler
with his accounts, A little later, when we
became better organized, Brother Thomas was
made treasurer of the Mission, in which capacity
he served the Mission very efficiently for many
years. I must not fail to mention a special kind
of work that I prosecuted in this place among
the higher class people. I took special pains to
make the acquaintance of the best families in the
city, calling upon them in times of affliction. I
often had opportunity to explain our belief to
them at a time, and under circumstances, when
the truth came home to them with unusual force.
I think much might be done in reaching the
higher classes, were they properly approached. I
do not for one moment think we should n^lect
the lower classes for the higher, nor do I think
we should pass by the higher for the lower; we
are to go to all without distinction. All need the
Gospel, as all are under condemnation, and the
proclamation of pardon includes all. The year



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TwENTY-ON^ Years in India. 157

1862 is memorable in the history of our
Mission. Three noble and devoted mission-
ary ladies passed on to heaven that year;
Mrs. Jackson died in Budaon about the
middle of September, Mrs. Thoburn died in
Naini Tal in October, and Mrs. Pierce in Luck-
now in November. Circumstances now arose
when it was thought necessary for us to remove
to Moradabad ; this was done with many regrets.
I foimd my attachment for the work in Shahje-
hanpore had become very strong, especially for
the school. Teachers and pupils manifested the
deepest feeling over my leaving. It had cost me
much anxious labor to get the school into the state
it was then in, and I hoped for much from it.

I rose soon after midnight, on the day we
were to leave, hoping to have two or three hours
of quiet to do some work that remained to be
done, so that all might be in proper shape for my
successor. Soon I heard a soft tap at my door,
which proved to be one of the teachers of the
school, who had come to me to talk with me about



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158 Twenty-one Years in India.

becoming a Christian. He seemed to be much
moved, but evidently shrank from the cross he
saw it involved. I gave such advice as I thought
the case demanded, and prayed with him. I am
not sure that I have ever seen him since. I have
the greatest sympathy for young men situated as
he was, convinced of the falsity of their own sys-
tems, and yet so situated that to forsake them
involves the loss of everything in this world, as
it must seem to them. Great wisdom is needed to
deal with such cases. Sometimes those who seem
to feel the cross the heaviest will be very brave
and patient in bearing it in the end.



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CHAPTER IX.

Removal to Moradabad, and Furlough Home.

Mr. Judd and Mr. Brown had been at Morad-
abad; Mr. Judd was now sent to Lucknow, and
Mr. Brown to relieve me at Shahjehanpore. Mr.
Jackson was to have been associated with me at
Moradabad, but he only remained a short time,
as he found it necessary to return home with his
motherless child. Then Mr. and Mrs. Parker
came to fill the vacant place, but they only re-
mained during the cold weather, and were con-


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Online LibraryG. Drysdale (George Drysdale) DempseyTubular and other iron girder bridges, particularly describing the Britannia and Conway tubular bridges; with a sketch of iron bridges and illustrations of the application of malleable iron to the art of bridge-building. With wood engravings → online text (page 7 of 13)