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General council of the Congregational and Christia.

The Year book of the Congregational Christian churches of the United States of American. 1929-60 online

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7°/"FIRST MORTGAGE LOANS S"""

NESS COUNTY, KANSAS, RECEIVED THE FIRST PREMIUM
FOR THE BEST COUNTY EXHIBIT

At the Kansas City Exposition of 1888, the competition being open to all the States west of
the MiBsissippi River. Ness County was also awarded the First Prize for " The Best Showing
in Products of the Soil and Resources, including Tree Growth," at the Southwestern Kansas
Exposition of 1886, in competition with fourteen other Kansas counties.

Our loans rarely exceed 25 per cent of the actual value of property, and are as SAFE AS
GOVERNMENT BONDS. Our $400 and $600 mortgages are on precisely the same class of
fjATms as ordinarily carry $700 and $800. Loans taken by and under the direct personal super-



vision of



N". O. MERRILL, r*resident.




#^





NESS COUNTY BANK,

Official Depository of the County.

SXJBSCRIBKD Ci^I>ITA.L $350,000 OO

I'AID IN 1S5,000 OO

LIABILITY • . . . 500,000 OO

Oldest and financially the strongest banking institution in Western Kansas. County Warrants a Specialty.



Special Notice to Clergymen, —it is imperative that ctergymen. above all other classes
of the community, should have for the Investment of their surplus funds, which are oftentimes limited in amount,
• security of absolute soundness, containing no element of a speculative nature, and on which they can rely for a
steady income at stated intervals. Our mortgages are tftken with the utmost care, the security is more than ample,
the rate of interest is high, and we guarantee principal, interest, title, and complete cart of the loan until fully
paid. Among our customers are Savings Banks, National Bank Presidents and Directors, Lawyers, Physicians,
and many Clergymen, and not a dollar of the many thousands intrusted to us has ever been lost. We will,
in all cases, make your interests our own, and respectfully Invite your patronage.

For Illustrated Hand-Book and full information, apply to Eastern Office,



113 Devonshire St.,




, Manager.



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MUDGE'S NEW PRAYER-MEETING BOOK,

SONGS OF PRAISE.

EDITED BY

LEWIS WAED MUDGE, OF PEIUOETdN.



3X



Just published, in attraictive style

503 Hymns. ^"^ *' ^^"^ introduction prices, for use g | | | j

ooc T in Church Prayer Meetings, Endeavor «""»H«<*V<* «"w™«-

325 Tunes. societies, Associations, and Gospel 21 DOXOlOgieS.

Meetings.



THESE QUOTATIONS SHOW THE DRIFT OF OPINION.

Rev. Wolcott Calkins, Eliot Congrregational Ohurchy Newton,

Mass, : " I have examined the elegant volume, Songs op Praisb, and
regard it of the highest character."

Rev. Sdwin F. See, General Secretary Brooklyn Y. M. C. A. :

** I have carefully examined the Songs of Praise, compiled and edited
by Dr. Mudge, and believe it will be of great service where a compact
and yet complete collection of good music is called for."

Rev. Fritz W. Baldwin, First Congrregational Church, Chel-
sea, Mass.: "Songs of Praise is a worthy companion to the
CARitiiNA Sanctorum, the larger book, which I regard as one of the
best hymn books printed. Songs of Praise seems to me well adapted
for smaller churches. It gives evidence of having been carefully edited,
and in mechanical finish it is neat and attractive. The use of these
books cannot fail to elevate the standard of musical taste in the
churches."



Send for Examination Copies of Songs of Praise, and also of the

CARMlNfl SANCTORUM,

the new Church Book, by Drs. Hitchcock, Eddy, and Mudge, now in use in
over 400 Congrregrational and Presbyterian Churches. Address the
Publishers,

A. S. BARNES & CO.



268 & 266 Wabaih Ave.,
CHICAGO.



Ill anil 113 ^iHi St., New Yorl



6 Somerset Street.
BOSTON.



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ABBOT academy;



POR YOTIM LADIES.



SIXTT-FIBST TEAE.



ANDOVER, MASS.

The flill course of study covers four years, and embraces all the usual academical studies,
special attention being given to Mental and Moral Philosophy, English and G-eneral Literature »
the History of Art, and to the Latin, French, and German Languages. Superior advantages are
afforded in Music, Drawing, Painting, and Elocution. Pupils are received for a single year or more.

■This Academy enjoys many incidental advantages through the other literary institutions in
the same village, while easy access to Boston and Cambridge brings within its reach fine Music,
Art Galleries, Museums, Cabinets, and the Botanical Garden, to all of which, classes, with their
teachers, have occasional access. The Academy has a fine Clark Telescope, good working cab-
inets, models and apparatus of its own.

The domestic arrangements are peculiarly homelike. The school is divided into three sepa-
rate families in separate houses, each under its own matron and teachers. One of these families
is made up wholly of pupils in French, in which language the daily table-talk is carried on under
the direction of the Fren'ch teacher. Another family is occupied with German in like manner.
The grounds are spacious and tasteful, forming an attractive part of the quiet and pleasant village.

The school has been successfully conducted for more than twenty-five years by the same
principal teacher, whose constant endeavor is to so educate girls that they may mature into
healthful, cultivated, earnest, Christian womanhood.

The total expenses for board, including fuel, lights and washing, and for tuition, except music
and drawing, are 8300 per annum. The sixty- first /ear begins on Thursday, Sept. 12, 1889.

Apply for Catalogues to W. F. Draper; for information or admission to

MISS PHILINA MgKEEN, Principal, Andofer, Mass.

PHILLIPS ACADEMY,

ANDOVER, MASS.

OSTK HXTNDREI) AJSTD TENTH YEAR.

CECIL F. P. BANCROFT, Ph. D., Principal..



B. G. Coy, M. A., Greek.

M. 8. McCuRDT, M. A., Mathematics.

D. Y. CoM'sTOCK, M. A., Latin.

W. B. Graves, M. A., Natural Sciences.

G. T. Eaton, M. A., Mathematics.

D. Collin Wells, B.A., History and German.



E. H. Norton, Jr., B. A., English..
G. D. Pettbe, B. a., Mathematics.
G. C. Kimball, M. A., Latin and Greek*,
Prof. J. W. Churchill, Elocution.
Edward Taylor, Treasurer.



The Academy continues to fit boys thoroughly and systematically, in large classes, and under
a permanent and experienced Faculty, for the various colleges, scientific and professional schools.
Students have been recently prepared for Harvard, Tale, Dartmouth, Bowdoin, Wesleyan,
Oberlin, Boston University, Williams, Amherst, Columbia, Princeton, Colby, Hamilton, Univer-
sity of Michigan, Brown, Lafayette, Middlebury, University of Vermont, Trinity, University of
the City of New York, Rutgers, Cornell, Sheffield Scientific School, Lawrence Scientific School,.
Columbia School of Mines, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Rensselaer Polytechnic In-,
stitute, several Medical Colleges and Law Schools, and for numerous business pursuito^

For Oatalogne and other infornxat^on., address the Princijj^aU



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GANNETT INSTITUTE

FOR YOUNG LADIES,

69 CHESTER SQUARE, BOSTON, MASS.
REV. GEORGE GANNETT, D. D. - - Principal



Location and Bueldings. ~ It has one of the most beautiful and desirable loca^
tions in the city. The school building: was erected expresslv for the purposes of the
Institute, on the most approved plan of architecture and interior arrangements.
The entire establishment is heated by steam, and has all the modern conveniences.

Organization. — It was organized thirty-four years since, and its plan from
the beginning has been eminently liberal and comprehensive.

Departments. — It has three departments, — the Preparatory, Intermediate,
and Senior, Thoroughness in character and methods of instruction characterizes
«ach. The Senior Department embraces a four-jears course, which includes the
Higher Mathematics, History, Philosophy, the Sciences, Ancient and Modem Lan-
guages, Art'^studies and the various Literatures.

"^A PARTIAL course may be taken, or a selection of -studies is permitted.

Diplomas are awarded to those who shall have honorably compieted, the pre-
scribed course.

Teachers and Professors. — In every department) such teachers and pro-
fessors only are employed as have been enricned by years of eminent success in their
work ; and so large is the Board of Instruction, in proportion to the number of pupils,
that an unusual division of labor is secured. '

Libraries. — A library of several thousand volumes, and a large and valuable
Art Library, afford every* incentive to reading, study, and research, outside of the
text-books.

A Home is found here for twenty-five young ladies and six of the lady teachers,
who constitute a family of refining intimacies and social culture.

A Lecture Course. — Lectures upon History, Literature, Philosophy, Science
and Art are given annually, not to displace but to supplement the class-room training.

Drawing and Painting. — In this department a resident lady teacher of well-
inown ability is occupied during all the school hours.

In French, German and Italian, native teachers are employed.

Terms for Day Pupils, from 380 to $200 per annum.

Terms for Family Pupils: Board and Tuition, in English, French, Latin,
German, Drawing, Penmanship, physical Culture, and Lectures, S500 for the
■scholastic year.

The Extras are Music, Painting, and Italian.

The thirty-sixth year commences Wednesday, Oct. 2, 1889.

For Catalogue and Circular, apply to

REV. GEORGE GANNETT, D. D., PrinCIPAI..

S. A. CHOATE,

ADVERTISING MANAGER OF

CONGREGATIONAL YEAR-BOOK,



265 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON, MASS.

ESTABLISHEIt^ 1867.

LOW ESTIMATES, CAREFUL SERVICE, RELIABLE DEA*»ING,
Are the Characteristics of this Agency.

Priiicipals of Schools and Colleges are invited to send for estimates before placmg^'"
their contracts from year to year. Estimates furnished promptly, and free of ^hftij©*



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IOWA COLLEGE,

GRINNELL. IOWA.



FIVE COURSES OF STUDY, VIZ. :

1. English Studies : Introductory to Classical or ScieDtifie, or preparatory for teaching.

2. ACADBMic O0UB8E8 : Two or three years, preparing for higher co

3. CoLLBQB C0UB8BB : Four years, Classical, Scientific, and Literary



2. ACADBMic CouBSES : Two or three years, preparing for higher courses.

3. CoLLBQB C0UB8E8 : Four years. Classical, Scientific, and Literary.

4. Musical Coubsb : Including Vocal and Instrumental Music and Harmony, occupying



flrom two to four years

6. Didactic Coubsb : Giving one year's work in the Theory and Practice of Teaching.

FALXj TEBM opens SEPT. 10, 1889.



TERMS OF ADMISSION.

students from High Schools, Academies, and Seminaries admitted on certificate of scholl^r-
ship and character j^ithout examination, so far as studies have b^en pursued.

Unconditional admission after satisfactory examination in the following studies :

FOR THE CLASSICAL COUR8K.

I. Physiology, Physical Geography,
n. Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry. ^

m. History of United States, General History Civil Government.
IV. Knglish Grammar and Composition. ^

V. Latin — Grammar, Composition, Caesar 8 books, Cicero 5 orations, Virgil 5 books, Sallnst.
VI. Greek — one year's study. •

Fob the Scientific Coubbe, the requirements are the same as for the Classical, except
Greek, with additional Latin in place of Greek.

Fob the Litebaby Coubsb, the requirements are the same as for the Classical, except
Latin and Greek.



IOWA COIiliBGBS is in its 43d year. It eqjoys the reputation of being the oldest and best
College in Iowa.

It is located at Grinnell,the junction point of the Central Iowa and the C, R. I. & P. R'ys,
accessible to all parts of the State.

The rate of increase in number of students the last year is beyond that of any previous year.

The Grade of Scholarship has in no way been lowered-. At the same time careful attention
is paid to the moral and spiritual as well as the mental conditions of those in attendance.

For Catalogues arid other information, address,

GEORGE A. GATES, iV«*.
Or H. H. RoBBiNS, Secretary.

WELLS COLLEGE,

FOR WOMEN,
AURORA, CAYUGA LAKE, N, Y.

FULL COLLEGIATE COURSE OF STUDY.



INSTRUMENTAL AND VOOAL] MITSIO, DRAWma, PAINTING, ETO.



Iiocation unsurpassed for beauty and healthfulness. Buildings Megant. Com-
bines extended and thorous:]! instrfiction with the essentials of a refined
Christian home. Terms moderate. Send for Catalogue.

I SESSION BEGINS SEPT. II, 1889.



El S. FRISBEE, D. D., President



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ATLANTA UNIVERSITY,



REV. HORACE BUMSTEAD, D. D., PRESIDENT.



The Institution has 500 students, under 26 officers and teachers,
in all grades of study from the primary school up through grammar, normal,
and collegiate courses.

Industrial training is given to boys in wood-working, i/on-working,
mechanical drawing, printing, and farming ; and to girls in cooking, sewing,
dress-making, and domestic economy.

The religious training given is thoroughly Chtistian, but strictly
unsectarian. An eminent Georgian recently said: "The public school
teachers furnished by Atlanta University have not only the education, but
also the character needed, and they do as good work as is done in the white
schools."

The 200 graduates froto normal and college courses are spreading
their leavening influence through Georgia and surrounding States. More
than two thirds are teaching, ten being principals of city schools. Hundreds
of undergraduates are also teaching every summer. Ten graduates are pas-
tors, two are lawyers, two are doctors. Many are heads of Christian families.

The property consists of sixty acres of land within the corporate
limits of Atlanta, four large brick buildings, substantially but very econom-
ically built, library of 6,000 volumes, apparatus, and industrious equipment,
all unencumbered and free from debt. Besides about $28,000 of invested
funds, mostly scholarships, it has no endowment.

An endowment of at least $250,000 for current expenses is urgently
needed, and, until it is secured, an annual appeal must be made for at least
$18,000, to carry on the work now organized.



Form of Bequest.

I give and devise to the Board of Trustees of the Atlanta University at

Atlanta, Ga., the sum of...: dollars, payable, etc.

[Three witnesses.]

The Bulletin of Atlanta University, a four-page monthly printed
by our students, contains much additional information about our work. Sub-
scriptions at twenty-five cents a year may be sent to the Treasurer of Atlanta
TJniversity, Atlanta, Ga.



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FISK UNIYERSITY.



HISTORY.

Thb work of founding Fisk University was begun early in October, 1865. It was clearly
«een tbat Nashville was a strategic point, at which should bu built up a great central institution
on a foundation broad enough to enable it to provide for every educational demand that should
arise in the development of the newly emancipated race. Hence, in 1867, a charter was secured
for a university. The name was given in honor of Gen. Clinton B. Fisk, who most heartily and
efficiently co-operated in its establishment, and who has ever since been President of the Board
of Trustees.

RKSXJLTS.

Beginning with a people just emancipated, the growth of Fls^ University fitly reprei^ents the
educational progress of tne race during a period of freedom covering less than a quarter of a
century, when the ** Fisk School " was started there were no public schools for colored chil-
dren in Nashville, and there was no demand for instruction except in the simplest branches of a
•common-school education ; the pupils were then all from the city. There are now in successful'
operation the following departments of instruction: —

I. The Common English, which has beenN^aintained to meet A continued need on the part
of Diany of the patrons of the University.
II. The Normal, which has a course of study extending over four years, beginning with

Latin and Algebra.
III. Thb College Preparatory, which has a course of study extending over three years,

beginning with Latin and Algebra, and requiring two years of Greek.
iV. The OoLLh gb, which has a four-years course of stady additional to that provided in the

College Preparatory Course.
V. Theological. Thus far the instruction in this Department has been fragmentary, but
plans are now being devised for the erection of an appropriate building for a Theological
Seminary, and the enlarging of the Faculty, so as to provide a course of study covering
three years.
TI. Department op Music, with an extended course in both instrumental music and voice .
culture. There are over one hundred pupils in this Department. In addition, vocal
music is taught throughout all the courses of study. The Mozart Society studies and
renders the Classics in music.
"VII. Industrial. This important department of education has not been made a prominent
feature in the educational work of Fisk University. Printing and Carpentry are, how-
ever, taught to classes of young men. The young women are instructed in Nursing,
Cooking, and Sewing.

G-ROU3Srr>S ^nd btjilding-s.

The University has a campus of thirty acres, with buildings and other appliances for its
-educational work, which have cost $250,000.

ATTEND A.NCE:.

The present number of students is five hundred and eight. Twenty States are represented.

There have been graduate^, from the College Department eighty, and fi-om the Normal flfty-
■five. Many hundreds have received a good English education, which has fitted them for teach-
ling and business. The present number of pupils in the Normal and College Departments
nearly equals the entire number which has been graduated during the past twenty four years.
Of the Alumni ten have become ministers, six lawyers, five physicians, and most of the oth^s
fhold important positions as educators. Three are missionaries in Africa.

The University itf without endowment. The annual expenses, above the small income fk'om
(Students, are met by voluntary contributions, made directly to the University, or through the
American Missionary Association which founded the University and has continually fostered it.
THE DEMAND IS NOW IMPERATIVE FOR AN ADEQUATE ENDOWMENT. Haply
«ome one reading these lines may find pleasure in helping towards this endowment.

EXPENSES.

The cost of room, board, and tuition is $12.00 per calendar month. Instruction in Instru-
mental Music is fifty cents per lesson, including use of instrument for practice.

The Soholastio Year 1889-90 will open September 23d.

For information address either of the undersigned.

Rev. E. M. CRAVATH, D. D., President.

Rev. E. C. STICKEL, Treasurer.

Nashville, Tenn., June, 1889.



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RIPON COLLEGE,

WISCONSIN.



Ripon College was organized in 1863. Since that time it has made steady progress in
providing bnildings and famishing them with the best facilities for instruction within reach,
in manning its departmei^ts with able and devoted teachers, and in general reputation and
influence.

It is the aim of the Institution to provide for the liberal education of young men and women,
and in doing this to keep its standard fully up to that of the best Western colleges, and its meth-
ods of instruction in harmony wi^h the most enlightened views of education. It alms also to fur-
nish a thoyough preparation for the pursuit of college courses, and to provide a sound, practical
education for such as may desire to fit themselves for common-sehool teaching or for business.
Its purpose is also to make the expense of pursuiflg a course of liberal study as low as is con-
sistent with a high degree of excellence in its results, and thus to keep a liberal education within
the reach of young men and> women of limited means. It is likewise the earnest purpose to
conduct the Institution on distinctively Christian principles, and to have it pervaded vsith a strong
and healthy moral and religious influence. While aiming at the best results of intellectual train-
ing, its instructors ever bear in mind that character is more than these ; that the development of
character is an essential part of the work of an educational institution, and that there is no sound
basis of character except in Christian principle.

Classical, Scientific, and Musical courses of study are provided, and thorough Preparatory
and English Schools, under the care of the same Faculty, fit pupils for the higher courses. Buper-^
vision is constant, and self-help is particularly encouraged.

Ripon is situated in the region famous for beautiful summer resorts, the healthfalness of
its climate and absence of malarial diseases. Seud for Catalogue to

President, E. H. MERRELL, Ripon, Wis.

THE HOWARD UNIVERSITY.

, WASHINGTON, D. C.



OBJECT. — To ftirnish education to the colored race, without excluding
others. Both sexes received in all departments. Industrial training
imparted, as well as book knowledge.

DEPARTMENTS. — There are three Academic Departments: Normal,' Pre-
^paratory, and Collegiate. There are three Professional Departments:
Medicine (including Pharmacy and Dentistry), Law, and Theology.
That of Theology is under Congregational care, and is aided by the
American Missionary Association. No tuition is charged except for
Law and Medicine. Number of students, between four hundred and
five hundred.

WANTS. — There is no d6bt on its extensive grounds and buildings, but
endowments are needed for its theological professorships, its library^
and its student aid. Annual donations of money and clothing for stu-
dents are solicited from individuals and churches. For catalogue or
information, address

Rkv. WM. W. PATTON, D. D., LL. D., President.



Online LibraryGeneral council of the Congregational and ChristiaThe Year book of the Congregational Christian churches of the United States of American. 1929-60 → online text (page 1 of 40)