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!R POEMS




GENEVIEVE FARNELL-BOND




The Faun

and other

Poems



BY
GENEVIEVE FARNELL-BOND




BOSTON

SHERMAN, FRENCH $ COMPANY
1913



COPYRIGHT, 1913
SHERMAX, FRENCH & COMPANY



SRLE
URL



DEDICATION

There is a somewhat in the souls of men

That urges them to consummate their deed

To struggle on and on, unheeding when

They meet with failure, or mayhap succeed.

It may not matter though the way be long,
Or if we go alone unto the close

There is one thought to bid the heart be strong:
Somewhere along the path is one who knows.



A WORD AT THE BEGINNING

My old-time friend, Genevieve Farnell-Bond,
whom I have known well as a free-lance of the
pen, journalist and editor, brings me her first
book of verse for a word of introduction.

Perhaps I might say that a book of poems
needs no introduction: for poetry carries its
own passport to the heart. Perhaps some may
say that we already have enough books of
poems that this is an age of science and not
of song that it is a time for dollars and not
for dreams. But this is only the wisdom of
the foolish. For the soul of man, like the dry
earth, needs renewing from time to time. Po-
etry comes as an April rain of the spirit, to
call out new blade and blossom, to keep alive
in man the sense of youth, the feeling of morn-
ing and romance.

So we welcome this new poet, with her shallop
of song that lifts its sail to take the winds of
fortune. May it find summer seas and quiet
havens, where the warm wind

"Trembles across the harp of greening boughs."



In this freight of song there is nothing that
pleases me more than "The Faun." Such a
passage as this has in it an echo of the voices
of the morning:

Sometimes you hear me in the dawn
The little-horned, fleet-footed faun:
You'll see a ripple as I pass
And shake the dew-pearls from the grass,
A shadow through the gray morass,
So quickly gone.

And when the gold-god of the day
Comes wheeling up the azure way,
Sometimes I pipe on flutes of Pan
To stir his droil soul if I can
With sweet dismay.

EDWIN MARKHAM.

West New Brighton,
New York.



Many of these poems have appeared
in The Cosmopolitan, Harper's Bazar,
The New York Herald, The New York
American, The Los Angeles Times,
The Cincinnati Commercial Tribune,
Hesperian Tree and other publications.
The poem from which the volume takes
its name was one of a hundred by
American poets, originally selected and
published for the first time in "The
Lyric Year" by its editor. Thanks are
due to all of these publications for per-
mission to republish.



CONTENTS

PAGE

THE FAUN 1

THE STAR CHILD 4

A SEA MEMORY 5

A LOST SONG 10

PRAYER IN SILENCE 11

BIRTH 12

Die Walkure 13

THE SOURCE 15

THE PAUPERED RICH 16

THE MASTER HEART 17

MY BRIDE o' MAY 19

LOVE'S KEEP 20

SOUL UNION 21

WIND OP THE NIGHT 24

SENSITIVE PLANTS 25

FOR ELLA WHEELER WILCOX 26

To ROBERT BURNS 27

To ONE READING FROM SWINBURNE ... 29

BALLAD OF LILIES 30

MID-WOOD SPIRIT 32

THE HARBINGER 33

ASHES OF ROSES 35

AT VALLEY FORGE 36

THE POET DEAD 37



PAGE

THANKSGIVING 38

AT THE GRAVE 39

RISEN 40

THE HUNGER 41

A LITTLE LIE 43

THE TIME HAS COME 44

THE POOR RELATION 45

A SPRING MEMORY 47

DAME PROPRIETY 48

A WARNING WORD 49

MEETING AND PARTING 50

IN LIGHT AND SHADOW 51

A Kiss 52

VALENTINE 53

AN APRIL WAY 54

A CHILD'S Kiss 55

To A CHILD'S SOUL 56

THE BOOK SPIRITS 57

THE AWAKENING OF MAGDALENE ... 58

WHITE VIOLETS 61

SUPPLICATION 63

RENUNCIATION 64

THE CITY OF THE DEAD 66

A ROSE-LEAF'S PRESSURE .67

PARIS, GOOD-BYE 69

AFTER THE STORM 70



PAGE

THE SOUL OF THE SNOW 71

SONG 73

SONNET TO A ROSE 75

MOONLIGHT VILLANELLE 76

SONG AT NIGHT 77

IF I SHOULD COME 78

SPIRIT OF FIRE 79

Kiss ME You ! 80

LOVE ME WHILE You MAY 81

THE PASSIONATE SONG 82

SHALL WE DISCOVER? 83

A MAIDEN'S HEART 85

SONG OF THE COQUETTE 86

A CLIMBING ROSE 88

To A SHY SWAIN 89

INVOCATION TO LOVE 90

THE HOLY GRAIL 91



THE FAUN

SOMETIMES you hear me in the dawn,
The little-horned, fleet-footed Faun;
You see a ripple as I pass
And shake the dew-pearls from the grass-
A shadow through the gray morass,
So quickly gone.

Lo, when the first faint-throated note

Of feathered songster is afloat,
A soft call on the silvered air
Will tell you that the Faun is there
To lure you to his leafy lair,
Through paths remote.

I hide to watch the ruddy sun
Light up each dew-globe, one by one,
Until, with opalescent blaze,
A-spangle is the rosy haze
That lies along the wooded ways
Where I have run.

And when the gold god of the day
Comes wheeling up the azure way,
Sometimes I pipe on flutes of Pan
Soft pulsings never made of man,
To stir his droil soul if I can
With sweet dismay.



[1]



One day I lay at golden noon
With calm content half in a swoon
The world ablaze with brazen heat
Beyond my leafy, green retreat
But here the brown earth cool and sweet,
A- j oy with June.

And then she came ... all clad in white,

Her eyes mysterious as night ;

Her lips 'were red and ripe and young,
Her hair a faint gold halo flung ;
About her all the fragrance clung
Of youth's delight.

And sinking to a leafy vale,

She sang a melancholy tale:

"Though Love has never come to me,
To-morrow I a wife shall be,
The church all sweet with melody
And roses pale.

"I shall have wealth and brave attire,

And all the people will admire!

Though he be what the world calls old,
Though callow youth may term him cold,
All shall be bought with gleaming gold
In my desire."



Nimbly I blew a little tune,

And trembling stopped, with gentle croon
Until the maiden fell asleep,
Lest she should hear me slyly creep
Beside her in the grasses deep . . .
And then eftsoon

I bent me to her shell-pink ear,
And whispered that her heart might hear:
"Lo, all about you in the grass,
In every cranny that you pass,
Is greater wealth than men amass
With toil and tear

"Are little lovers, two by two,
With hearts that sing and wildly woo !
And all the voices of the trees
Are throbbing with Love's rhapsodies;
And these alone may bring heart's ease
To such as you !

"From far the lion seeks one mate
He calls to her with heart elate !
And to your lips this kiss I press
That waking you shall know no less.
Till Love comes in swift eagerness
I bid you wait !"



[3]



THE STAR CHILD

BLUSTERING winds blow out of the West,
Shaking the windows ; away in the night
Glitters Aldebaran's far ruddy light.
Clinging and curled in his warm, soft nest,
Close to a love-laden, brooding breast,
Peering afar at that star all bright,
The scion of numberless aeons lies
Yet not so old that the still surprise
Of morning has fled from his mystic eyes.

"I lived in that star world, in ages past,
Before you were mine," he whispers ; "But cast
My love through the silence, seeking you, dear,
Until your love caught me lo, I am here !"



[4]



A SEA MEMORY

I DID not know I could not guess it,

My flesh was young, and Earth was new ;

My soul, confused, would not confess it,
That Love had come, and brought me You.

And yet my tears rushed up in wonder
Your eyes leapt to me through the crowd,

Drove doubt and laws and lies asunder,
As blade of sunlight cleaves a cloud.

The silence then was very tender

How could we speak who felt so much?

For Truth had naught to bar nor bend her,
Nor to disguise her mystic touch.

One night beside the sea, low-singing,
We wandered, and the little stars

Upon her shining breast were swinging,
And love and life might have been ours

Our own, dear Heart, just for the taking;

We leaned and laughed with clasping hands,
Love, when we heard the wild waves breaking,

Before they eddied up the sands.

Then you arose in sudden glory,

The sea surged, circling, at your feet,

And I recalled the old-time story,
And all the world grew still and sweet.

[5]



I knew then, in the young world's splendor,

In ages gone with pulsing feet
How I had run, all wild and slencter,

The early morning sea to greet.

And when into her salt arms springing
I swam, lithe-limbed, upon her breast,

I listened to her strange soft singing,
And felt her heaving, fierce unrest.

Then leaping from the waves, all shining,
I shook the sea-drops from my hair,

The sea-weeds 'round my white limbs twining,
I turned, and saw that you were there.

That day, as now, your great eyes Tield me,
Warm, glowing in the morning light,

And your imperious youth compelled me
To love and fear you and to flight.

You followed, and the crags were ringing
With the wild rapture of your song,

From rock to rock my white hands clinging,
You followed, fierce and straight and strong.

And then the mists came grayly floating
Came floating inland from the sea;

One backward glance, soft laughter throating,
I sprang, and you were lost to me.

[ 6]



And yet from my high cliff I heard you
I heard you singing through the night

The wild, sweet dream that pained and stirred

you,
Yet lured you onward to delight.

"Come down to me, you wild sea-spirit,

Or I shall die of loving you !
My heart is gentle never fear it;

But fly from me, and I pursue !

"Come down to me I've waited, waited
Through the white morning of my youth

Unstained, that when we met and mated
I should be yours in God's pure truth.

"Come down to me ! Your fragrance fills me
With strange, quick summonings of fire !

Come down ! Your hesitating kills me !
Come to me, girl of soul's desire!"

And when the gray mists broke asunder,
I saw you 'neath the morning star;

And then the sun's first gleaming wonder,
A burning, blood-red scimitar.

We stood together in the morning,
A strange, sweet shyness on our souls,

Love's first faint flush our brows adorning
With little fleeting aureoles.

[7]



You bent your head, your red lips pressing

Upon my brow the bridal kiss,
Our young lips tasting and confessing

Love's tender sacrament in this.

One moment then our star-white rapture
Was pierced with sudden shaft of fear ;

The Sea leapt hissing up to capture
The slender form you held most dear.

What though you cleft the waves and called me,
And beat your head upon the sand,

The Mother Sea had crossed and palled me,
My senses could not understand.

And yet my spirit surged above her,
And wept my sorrow at your feet,

And whispered, "I'll come back, my lover,
One day, and make your joy complete!"

And in your dark, salt locks I lingered,
I kissed with tears your swooning eyes ;

I pressed upon your breast, soft-fingered,
With showers of little sorrowing sighs.

And when I came again, I knew you,

Your lips, your eyes, your touch of fire !

Just as of yore I drank and drew you
Into my dawning dream's desire.

[8]



And then and then I hesitated,
That later night beside the sea,

When all the world was re-created,
With wealth of joy for you and me.

Oh, if your heart the draught of sadness
Has drained, it does not drink alone ;

Those times your sorrow burns to madness,
I match its passion with my own.

Sometimes, a-dream, your eyes all burning
With elfish laughter seek my own,

Your lips, red, tender, warm and yearning,
Your soft hair dark, and all sea-blown.

Now will we always go together,
Sweet soul, though we be far apart,

That morning kiss our bridal tether
And none but you shall know my heart.

And I, dear, shall no longer fear you
As in that morning mist of yore ;

My soul must hover ever near you,
E'en as the sea must seek the shore.

And when we wake from this sad dreaming,
I'll wait beside the Mother Sea,

For after all the pain and seeming
She'll lead you back to Love and me.

[9]



A LOST SONG

Do you remember that sweet moment, dear,

When roses hung in spiraled, rich perfume
Above the porch, and red squirrels chattered

near,

And blue jays flashed adown the summer
bloom ?

A robin's lonely nest deserted hung

In thick of tangled vines, where all day long

The wee hen brooded, till her heart was wrung
By storm that robbed her home of hope and
song.

The sun hung toward the west you came to me
Your dark hair drenched, your dea,r face
tawned of toil,

Your eyes a-light with love, so good to see,
About you still the fragrance of the soil.

And oh, your wooing lips were warm as earth
They sought my own in gathering gray of
night ;

The cricket hushed his eerie note of mirth,
And roses shed an incense of delight.

And listening now to music's mystic strain
In glare of jeweled light and satin sheen,

I would we had our kingdom back again
The riotous realm of Love, the nest of green.

[10]



PRAYER IN SILENCE

LOED, give me but the power to hold the pride
For which my flesh has been so crucified;
And give me power to smile on friend and foe,
With heart-uplift, that they may never know.

The wounds of Love, its raptures or its pain
Sink in the soil of souls, and are fhe grain
From which are sprung the fairest harvests, so
In quiet and in secrecy they grow.

Lord, that I have the strength to brave and

bear,

The veil of smiling silence let me wear.
Lord, let me fight my battle in the dark,
Alone, unaided; let the stillness hark

Alone to my heart's struggle ; let my hands
Alone tear up each rock that ragged stands
To bar my way, and rend my quivering flesh.
From far, free heights there blows a breeze all
fresh

With purity from crests of virgin snows ;
Deep deep into the mettled breast it goes,
To stir the ruddy blood to meet its chill,
To nerve the spirit with its quickening thrill.

Lord, that I have the strength to brave and bear,
The veil of smiling silence let me wear.

[11]



BIRTH

LET the winds play soft, and the winds play

light

For a soul for a soul that is born to-night !
Let us enter softly, and kiss the feet
Of the mother, lying pale and sweet.
Let us lift the infant from her face,
And fold it in a close embrace.
Let us hold it far from where man has trod,
Let us hold it up to the throne of God,
And pray with the strength of a deep desire,
Till he bends and he sends in a quivering fire
His breath through its soul, as a wind-swept

lyre!

Oh, the winds that are weeping soft and light
For a spotless soul that is born to-night.



DIE WALKURE

(After hearing Wagner's opera)

EVER the wild, weird music of that night

Sweeps the ^Eolian fibres of my soul:
Tempestuous warning from a barren height

Stirs through the deep-gloomed forests, till

the whole

Cimmerian storm comes bellowing; crashing
trees

Batter their regal heads in dazed alarm.
Furious the Gale pursues unfettered flees

The glacial Torrent from his longing arm.

Loudly she mocks him in her wild descent,
Flinging her stinging tresses in his face ;

Fiercely he curses gods that aid her bent,
Urging to greater speed his breathless pace.

She pales and sickens for her maddened pride
Death yawns before her in a black abyss.

She leaps ! he clasps her, passion's highest tide
Trembles a moment in his consuming kiss.



[13]



Darkness enfolds their forms : her pride, his love
Wed in destruction. Bald hills tower above
Below a waste of water rocks to rest
Colossal ruined forests on its breast ;
While comes a wail from the storm-ravished

hollow
As of a wanton spirit, "Follow follow!"



U



THE SOURCE

GRANT me to rest a little while apart

In the sun's morning, mist-dissolving dart,

For I am weary of the feel of things ;
Let me but listen to the tender thrush,
Hear the soft whir of him in upward rush,

Beating the sunlight with his brown, blithe
wings

Here, where the bare earth wakes from winter

swoon ;
Here, where the warm wind's low and gentle

croon

Trembles across the harp of greening boughs ;
Here where the brook bursts, bounding, as with

life
Newly attuned to recreative strife,

Stirring the slumb'ring seeds from snow-girt

sloughs.

Would I could carry word to the heart of man
How the fleet seasons over your bosom ran,

Mother, whose coldest touch is a caress,
Ever reviving hearts to bliss of being,
Ever the pent-up fire of spirit freeing

Thrilling once more with life and Love's ex-
cess.



[15]



THE PAUPERED RICH

I WATCH them, regal-ermined, tier on tier,
Unmoved, serene while music's pulsing tide
Swells ever upward, spreading high and wide.
Lo, now it shakes with fearsome prophecy,
Then luring, light, with momentary glee,
Rolls forward to the deeps of tragedy.

And far aloft a raptured, panting soul
Peers whitely from her hair's bright aureole
Her modest raiment crossed upon a breast
A-quiver with a glorious unrest,
The music's wild, sweet storm of life and

death
Indrawn with every palpitating breath.

And then I bring the haughty faces near,
I touch the pulses of them, young and old,
I touch their lips and hearts, and find them

cold.

O barren brows, the silken, jeweled snood
Will bring no fine, high rapture there to

brood !

Though music beat its ecstasy and pain
Upon you, when its tide shall ebb again
'Twill leave you unimpassioned, dull and sane.
Though outward power and grandeur may

ca j ole,
There is no beggary like a paupered soul.

[16]



THE MASTER HEART

"I CAERY the world in my heart," said the
Prophet of old;

"I live in the scars of the past, and the story
untold ;

I live as the fruit in the seed from the sow-
er's hand flung;

I live in the song of the bard, and in measures
unsung.

I flame in the sunset, and rise in mysterious
dawn;

I live in the roar of the lion, the cry of the
fawn.

I glitter in Mammon's desire, in the greed of
the sea ;

In famine of body and soul is the essence of me.

The master and slave, both oppressor am I and
oppressed,

The king in high state, and the beggar in me
are confessed.

The bearer of burdens the toiler 'neath sweat-
ing and tan

Behold him, rough-hewn in my image, for I am
that man !

I rose through the ages, through terror and
lusting and strife,

But followed my star till I mastered the mean-
ing of life;

[17]



And out of the tragedy, under the far eastern

sky,
I came with the comfort of man and his heart's

hungry cry.

"And you whom I love you must fare through
the labyrinth, too,

Unravel the meaning of all yea, the false from
the true;

And knowing, must grow in the silence, while
clinging to naught;

And yet you must love, and the things you have
other times sought

With greed, little heeding the souls you un-
knowingly slew

In giving and serving alone shall bring joy unto
you.

"So love, little brother of oxen, of rock and
of tree,

And loving, you rise, for you still are the
brother of Me.

I carry the world in my heart, with its blessing
or ban;

I love you, and lead you to brotherhood, chil-
dren of man !"



[18]



MY BRIDE O' MAY

MONTH of May Month of May,
You are all too far away !

What a wealth to me you bring
Eyes in whose abysses dwell
All there is of heaven and hell!
Heaven to know you will be true,
Hell to wait and long for you
Heart a-flutter 'neath a breast,
Loving, timid and distressed ;

Lips that cleave, and kiss, and cling,
Fingers glowing, tipped with fire
O my Love, the sweet desire
Just to hold you hold you so,
And to never let you go !
Month of May Month of May,
You who bring my wedding day !



[19]



LOVE'S KEEP

LOVE, you hold me hard against your heart
The veil that shrouds my soul is torn apart
By the wild throbbing of your pulses, dear;

1 melt into your being without fear.

For thus you pledged my future surety,
You kissed my lips, but kissed in purity.
You wound me in your arms, but held me there
Away from mine own fetters of despair.

O Love, the little moon may wax or wane,
The fitful Seasons fret the Earth in vain,
So you shall hold me as you hold me now,
With that sweet, tender light upon your brow !



[20]



SOUL UNION

SWEET soul, inviolate presence rarely known
By fleshly touch or contact ever near,

Your thoughts, transcending time and space,

are shown

My heavy heart, in forms as crystal clear;
Your mortal voice in ecstasy I hear,

To me by soft immortal breezes blown.

Your eyes of burning brown upon me play,
As strong as stars that pierce the gloom of

night,

Look through mine own as only those eyes may,
Illume my reveries with visions bright,
That leap to meet your thoughts as moths to

light,
When soul and soul unite in rhythmic sway.

A union tangible by earthly minds

The Destinies forbid; yet One more high

Unites us in a stronger tie that binds

The intellect and soul, and lights the eye
With triumph to a state which ne'er shall
die,

As Time his endless thread of life unwinds.



[21]



One moment only, in a dazzling dream,

I felt you turn your peerless soul to mine;

There shot athwart my heart a golden gleam
Which filled my breast with tremblings di-
vine:
For following fast the glorious glowing line

Our souls have traveled, until now they seem

Merged in a union of transcending bliss
I saw you stand within the shadowy space
From which my mind was wont your form to

miss;
Then hand and arm and lip, face pressed to

face,

The physical as souls we interlace,
United in a never-ending kiss.

We see the marvelous mystery unroll

Of all that must in mating pure be given

Life, body, heart and hand and mind and soul!

Our throbbing breasts, with sudden rapture

riven,
Dissolve the clouds of doubt through which

we've striven
At last to reach Love's one imperious goal.



[22]



The dream is vanished, and the golden blaze
That wrapped about our raptured wedded

forms,

And filled us both with wonder and amaze,
Enthralling both our souls with passioned

charms,

Has left to each within bereaved arms
The sad, sweet spirit of those ravished rays.

O Soul of me, this parting must be best
For would we not forget in Love's delight

Our fellow-beings, and our duty's test

Through life? But now each soul is strong

in right,
And aids the other shape the silver flight

Of hallowed song, that all the world be blest.



[23]



WIND OF THE NIGHT

OUT of what uncanny, weird abyss,

Wild wind of the night,

Do you wing your flight?
With your sad, soft sigh, your deathly kiss

On the window pane

Then you slowly wane,
The breath of a thwarted, maddening bliss.

From the pale, far glimmer through the trees

Comes whispering low

A shuddering woe,
With burd'nings of your mystic pleas;

E'en the Pleiads pale

As your eerie wail
Floats over the clouds' dark billowy seas.

Do you come with a message from the dead?

Do you strive to speak

To a soul you seek,
As you pass each shadowy, sleep-stilled bed?

In your measured moan

Do you bear the tone
Of a voice now into the darkness fled?



[24]



SENSITIVE PLANTS

TO EDMUND CLARENCE STEDMAN
October 8, 1903

WHERE the south breezes sweep in rapt unrest
Over ^Eolian pines, on Earth's brown breast,
Frail, sensitive filmy fingers grope through the

night
Grope shadowy green in the moon, for the Sun's

large light.

In the dark hours through which young spirits

grope

You feel the fire of all their high hearts hope;
And leaning from Song's sacrificial height,
You hail them on, and harbor toward the light.



[25]



FOR ELLA WHEELER WILCOX

WOMAN of fate brave daughter of the Noras,
Whose face has caught the far auroral light
That burned through ages drear and dumb

with blight

Serene and young of spirit, then as now,
Beneath the topaz tresses on your brow

I saw the impress of the wreath of thorns.

There was no way too perilous for your feet,
There was no fear of all you had to meet

In testing of the spheres ; and there arose
Out of the tortuous ways of loss and pain
A woman, sure of soul, who came again,

To lead where the white light of wisdom glows.



[26]



TO ROBERT BURNS

SCOTCH Bardie, there be those who name you
With questioning, and seek to shame you
For roistering muckle at the tavern,
For mocking at the holy cavern
Where Moody held at bay old Hornie,
And damned you to the pathway thorny.

You left full many a heart a-burning,
For your bland, bonny presence yearning:
For woman's een were your undoing,
And ever set you warmly wooing.

But Bardie, there was One who gave you
A cup o'er full, and were't to save you
You could not carry it unspilled,
Impetuous, yearning soul, soon chilled
By petty lives, whose meagre measure
Could not contain your heart's whole treasure.

And Bardie, we who follow after
Must love you for your lingering laughter
A lilt for souls sincere, but danger
For ilka man to truth a stranger.
Hypocrisy fled as from kelpie
Before the een of Ayr's young whelpie :
They pierced the vain veneer of snobbery,
And scorned the savor of nabobbery.

[27]



So, Bardie, brave as wind untethered,


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