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THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY

OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES




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©pinions ot tbc press



ON



MR. BARLOW'S POEMS



"A new poet has arisen among us; an indisputable poet, forcible, graceful,
earnest, courageous ; having something of real interest and great moment to say,
and knowing how to express his strong, bold thoughts in words of extraordinary
power, and lines of rare beauty." — Daily Telegraph.

"Mr. George Barlow manifests a power sufficient to place him in the same
rank with Tennyson, Swinburne, and Matthew Arnold." — Westminster Review.

"In many of his ethical and philosophical poems Mr. Barlow reaches sublimity." —
St. James s Gazette.

" Mr. George Barlow is not only a poet, he is also a profound thinker; for which
reason alone his works would deserve more than an evanescent fame." — Vanity Fair.

" As a singer Mr. Barlow can lay claim to a rank which few would question. . . .
His poetry must be admitted to overflow with passion, eloquence, and music." —
Black and White.

" Mr. Barlow is a master of passionate and picturesque verse. His command of
imagery, the force and fire of his ideas, the clearness and vigour of his style, are
unmistakable." — Light.

"There are many passages of exquisite sweetness and great force, passages that
remain in the memory and keep the soul aflame long after the book has been laid
aside. Only poetry of a high order can do this, nor is it too much to say that Mr.
Barlow is one of the truest and most stimulating singers of his day." — Publishers''
Circular.

"Very many of the single lyrics are full of beauty, and rich in music. That Mr.
Barlow is a genuine and often a very sweet singer, it were vain to deny." — Man-
ihester Examiner.

VOL. IV.



li OPINIONS OF THE PRESS

" Much of the poetry is very fine. Mr. Barlow is not only a true poet, he is also
a great thinker." — Birmingham Mail.

" Mr. Barlow seems to have speculated much, and felt keenly. His sympathies
are true, and his dreams have wings. He has many of the gifts for which we love
poets; originality, tenderness, grace, beauty of thought and expression." — To-day.

" Mr. Barlow is a sad singer ; but he is amongst those who sing." — Spectator.

" Mr. Barlow's claims to the enviable position of a distinguished poet are by no
means few. When the poetry of the nineteenth century comes to be considered by
future generations dispassionately, the class of poetry of which Mr. Barlow's works
are a fair example will be deemed, perhaps, of even greater value than it is now, as
reflecting a singular mood of thought, which unquestionably deserves closer study
than has hitherto been bestowed upon it." — Morning Post.

" If ' poets are all who love, who think great truths and tell them, and the truth
of truths be love ' then Mr. Barlow is a poet of no mean order." — British Quarterly
Review.

" Mr. Barlow possesses rare poetic gifts. He writes with fiery earnestness ; his
verse is nearly always melodious and flowing ; and he has a singular felicity of
language . " — Scotsman.

" Mr. Barlow is a poet whose works will always command an appreciative audience.
He possesses in a rare degree the two essentials of poetry — idea and expression. He
thinks well and he writes musically. We wish there were more poets like Mr.
Barlow — men who write from inspiration, not mere jinglers of rhyme. ... In the
series of Sonnets entitled ' To Gertrude in the Spirit World ' there is a tenderness
of feeling, a wealth of expression and imagination, a music, a grace, a pathos, with
an inexpressible longing and yearning that proclaim the writer no ordinary man." —
Perthshire Advertiser.

" Mr. Barlow is a true poet, and has written not a few Lyrics and Sonnets which
we believe the world will not willingly let die." — Echo.

" Like certain of the great early Italian poets, Mr. Barlow sometimes uses love as
a metaphor where philosophy and politics are meant. Like them, too, he is sincere
and beautiful where personal love is his undivided theme ; and if it is a daring thing
to leash his name with theirs (and it is), it is also a fair assumption that out of the
many Sonnets this author has written, there are some that do not forbid the
association and comparison." — Liverpool Daily Courier.



OPINIONS OF THE PRESS iii

"Mr. Barlow is no careless workman, trusting to the force of genius alone, and
neglecting the strictness of method and the grace of form. Indeed, grace and finish
are the conspicuous and prevailing qualities of his poetry." — Literary World.

" The interest and charm of the poems consists mainly in the delicate insight into
thoughts, yearnings, and vague speculations which are characteristic of our day,
and the fine melody of the versification." — Birmingham Daily Post.

" Mr. Barlow is a real poet ; but a poet especially of the present age. In his poetry
there is intense passion, yet pure and noble. . . . Although the verses speak for the
most part of the love of women, yet it is impossible to read them and not see that it
is a love for something more than woman, for an ideal, a spiritual ideal." — Literary
Churchman.

"It is a grand achievement to make love heard. In Mr. Barlow's poems its voice
is poured out with a strength that has its echo in every region of being to which the
divine passion can wing its way." — Sunday Times.

" It is scarcely too much to say that there is not a phase of pure and elevated
passion to which expression has not been given." — Glasgow Herald.



BY THE SAME AUTHOR.



A HISTORY OF THE DREYFUS CASE

Demy 8vo, pp. 4Q2, cloth, 40s. 6d.



OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

" Tres interessant, tres clair, et tres utile. Votre dernier chapitre, Chief ethical
results arrived at, est un terrible resume de toute cette affaire. . . . En annoncant
votre livre dans le Siecle, j'en publierai le dernier chapitre." — Letter from M.
Yves Guyot.

"J'ai grand plaisir a vous accuser reception de votre excellent livre sur l'affaire
Dreyfus. J'ai pu apprecier avec quel souci de la parfaite exactitude en toutes choses
le livre a ete ecrit. Vraiment, c'est merveille qu'un etranger ait pu se debrouiller
dans ce chaos." — Letter from M. Georges Clemenceau.

" Unhesitatingly recommended to all who feel an interest in the Dreyfus case." —
Glasgow Herald.

" This is certainly by far the most complete and comprehensive presentation of
the history of the scandal, and its drift is unmistakable. . . . Mr. Barlow has had
exceptional opportunities for the story of the scandal, and has used them to excellent
effect." — Northern Whig.

" So much of the attention of the public is naturally given to the Dreyfus and
Picquart cases that abundance of readers will be found for Mr. Barlow's book." —
Morning Post.

Iv



OPINIONS OF THE PRESS v

" Mr. Barlow's book deals much more largely in quotations of documents and
extracts from French papers, and these are in all important cases reproduced in
the original French, so that no possibility is left of questioning the author's account
of the almost incredible things they contain. If he uses strong, very strong,
language of condemnation and derision, the overwhelming evidence he adduces
carries the reader's approval generally along with him." — Scotsman.

" The abominable persecution of Colonel Picquart, set on foot by General
Zurlinden, and supported by forged documents, is commented upon in terms of the
strongest indignation." — Leeds Mercury.

"Mr. Barlow's contribution is a very lucid and vigorous narrative, in which no
essential point is missed, while the unravelling of the many obscurities of legal
chicanery, employed by the French War Office for the protection of Esterhazy,
is quite a masterpiece of acute perception and forcible exposition. Mr. Barlow
makes much of the point that up to the autumn of 1896 it would have been easy
for the Government to confess a doubt as to the guilt of Captain Dreyfus. . . .
The story is told by Mr. Barlow with great spirit. There are some piquant side-
lights on the manufacture of anti-Dreyfusite opinion in the provinces, where candidates
for popular suffrages sometimes declare that, innocent or guilty, Dreyfus deserves his
punishment. Mr. Barlow has a keen sense of humour, and even the most jaded
student of the Dreyfus case will find this volume entertaining.'' — Daily Chronicle.

" Mr. Barlow's work is much fuller than Mr. Conybeare's. The concluding
chapter is an excellent summary of the duties of various French officials, as under-
stood in practice by themselves. There is a great advantage in having the original
equivocations before one." — Bristol Times.

"Those who wish to know the wretched and tragic story of Dreyfus from the
beginning, cannot do better than read this excellent account. It is set forth with
admirable clearness, and with very high literary ability, and is more deeply interest-
ing than any novel I have read for years past." — Punch.

" Will do much doubtless to instruct the public on a matter of great intricacy." —
Literature.

"Mr. George Barlow's able ' History of the Dreyfus Case.'" — Speaker.

" Should be welcomed by English readers desirous of a book of reference to
help them in following the various stages in this cause celebre." — Aberdeen Free
Press.



vi OPINIONS OF THE PRESS

"Well worth reading. . • . The iniquity of the condemnations of Dreyfus and
Picquart is amply proved to the reader, but what is perhaps more important is the
terrible picture Mr. Barlow gives of the moral condition of the country." — Spectator.

" Our final word is, get Mr. Barlow's book and read it. It deals with the most
momentous issues of our day and generation, issues involving the very existence
of France as a free and light-loving nation." — Investors' Review.

" This is the most complete and detailed history of the Dreyfus case yet issued,
either in England or abroad." — Critic.

"The disclosure, in the capable way in which Mr. Barlow deals with it, will offer
a fine object-lesson to the whole world as to the degradation that may be suffered
by a democratic Constitution." — Bradford Observer.

" Surprisingly complete, impressively candid and convincing. Few Englishmen
possess the intimate knowledge Mr. Barlow does of the most minute details of
I affaire Dreyfus?' — Western Morning News.

" The volume is a ' revelation ' of the first order. Its analysis of the evidence is
masterly." — Sheffield Daily Telegraph.

"This is a strange book, and proves how fierce the passions are that have been
awakened. That it should be published in England to exhibit the episode to
English eyes, is in itself a remarkable fact." — Irish Times.

" A very detailed and clear narrative." — Daily News.

"The author gives more facts in his book than we remember to have seen before."
— Outlook.

"Mr. Barlow's narrative is a striking presentation of the weakness and crime
which have been so painfully evident among large numbers of the French."— -Jewish
Chronicle.

"Mr. George Barlow's 'History of the Dreyfus Case' may be commended
to English readers as an accurate and spirited narrative of this extraordinary
scandal. " — Manchester Guardian.

" Mr. Barlow is full of fact and solid argument, and almost invariably reasons
very closely. His story, full of detail, makes one quite clear on very many
heads. . . . the enormously detailed infamy of the whole thing becomes more
overwhelming than ever." — Pall Mall Gazette.



OPINIONS OF THE PRESS vii

" The case is among the most dramatic which even French history has known.
It is only possible to appreciate the full force of the tragedy when dealt with as
a whole. Mr. Barlow's array of dates and facts is even more complete than Mr.
Conybeare's. " — Saturday Review.

"The Dreyfus scandal has achieved a widespread if melancholy interest. Those
who may desire to judge for themselves, will find all the necessary data in the book
before us. . . . The book is well written and really worth reading." — United Service
Magazine.

" To be read with interest and profit by all who desire a detailed knowledge of
the subject." — Daily Graphic.

" Mr. Barlow has with much zeal and great care collected and arranged his
evidence, and we have no doubt very many will like to read his book." — Army and
Navy Gazette.

"Few people thoroughly understand the case of ex-Captain Dreyfus and his
connection with the famous 1894 bordereau, but there can be no excuse for such
ignorance now that we have displayed on all our bookstalls Mr. George Barlow's
'History of the Dreyfus Case.'" — Enfield Chronicle.

" In the work before us the events are all recorded in chronological order, and
the deductions therefrom plainly placed before the reader, the part — indeed, the
very great part — taken in the affair by the Church is brought prominently forward,
and great insight is obtained as to the objects and motives which guided many of
the actors in the historic drama. ... It is a most useful work, and is issued at a
very opportune time." — United Service Gazette.

"Those who may desire to study the case in detail, have an excellent opportunity
in the pages of this work." — Liverpool Daily Courier.

"Valuable as an historical record of one of the most notable cases in French
history." — Army and Navy Journal (New York).



TO THE WOMEN OF ENGLAND AND
OTHER POEMS.

N.B. — The above book now forms Volume the Ninth of the " Complete

Works."

OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

" Literature is always rich in surprises. New poets like Messiahs arise in the
most unexpected quarters, and are generally received but coldly by the world.
Thoughts such as these seem to have suggested themselves to the author of a volume
of verse which recalls the limpidity and freshness of Spring. . . . Mr. George Barlow
is justified, for he is unquestionably a true poet. He has struck a distinct note of
his own. He has made a place for himself. What can it matter though he
may be neither a Morris nor a Tennyson, if he stirs emotions which they never did ?
This he certainly does. He is what the true singer should be — a poet of the
heart. . . .He voices the deep, strong passions of humanity, its hopes, its longings,
its half consummated joys, its eternal despair. These are old themes, it is true,
but Mr. Barlow's greatest merit is that he is able to treat them in a way that is quite
new. " — Daily News.

"The book has a rare charm, and it will be read with interest and admiration
by all lovers of poetry." — Scotsman.

" Many of the short pieces in this volume are things that will last, for Mr. Barlow
possesses the poet's soul. He has imagination and he has form, and neither of
these gifts precludes him from an admirable simplicity of expression." — Newcastle
Chronicle.

" A volume of poems, most of them beautiful in sentiment, and musical in
expression. " — Inverness Courier.

viii



OPINIONS OF THE PRESS ix

"These are true poems, which well sustain the author's recognised claim to a
high place among our living poets. He is gifted with a strong and vivid imagination,
and many of his pieces are exceptionally rich in beauty of thought and language.
They are eloquent, graceful, artistic, and not unworthy to rank with similar com-
positions by Tennyson and Browning, often approaching the one in form and the
other in subtle thinking. . . . The piece which gives its title to the volume reads
like the message of a true seer. All the other poems are good, and some of the
sonnets are specially fine." — Aberdeen Journal.

"We think Mr. Barlow's poems should find many admirers." — Manchester
Courier.

" Mr. Barlow's sonnets prove him to be no weakling singer. ' The Rose,' ' One
Goddess,' 'The Life Eternal,' 'The Soul's Embrace,' and 'God's Holiest Shrine,'
are all remarkable for the richness of their music, the last named being filled with a
spirit of almost devotional reverence for noble womanhood, a quality notable in
many of his best poems." — Lady's Pictorial.

" There are many short poems which, once read, will never be wholly for-
gotten." '—-Light.

" The themes range throughout all human life and beyond it, and evince a deep
and passionate love of Nature." — Lady.

" There are many really fine poems in the volume, and it will well repay perusal.'"
— Lloyds News.

"There are many gems of extreme beauty, of exquisite fancy, and high-soulec
expression that cause the mind to linger long over the book after its covers have been
closed. " — Publishers' Circular.

" In the lyrics Mr. Barlow is at his best. Not infrequently he is singularly
felicitous in rhythm and melody." — Birmingham Post.

"Mr. Barlow is poet, philosopher, politician. ... He is not only a singer,
but a deep thinker. He puts great thoughts into fine language. As a philosopher,
Mr. Barlow ranks as high as any living poet." — Vanity Fair.

" Mr. Barlow has strength, sometimes to the point of ruggedness, though for
the most part his workmanship shows careful attention to detail. At his best he
is very good, and he is at his best in his love poems." — Liverpool Post.

VOL. IV. *



THE

POETICAL WORKS

OF

GEORGE BARLOW



THE

POETICAL WORKS

OF

GEORGE BARLOW



IN TEN VOLUMES



Vol. IV



LONDON
HENRY J. GLAISHER

57, WIGMORE STREET, CAVENDISH SQUARE





PK






H0G3




Contents


3a <w


At

PAGE


Love-Lyrics (1882)


v, <•/




For Ever and Evermore




3


A Gift of Spring




8


Autumn Messages ....




12


The River and the Sea .




15


Songs of Night to Morning :






I. At the Theatre




20


II. And Yet




22


III. "Perhaps a Dream it is'




2 5


IV. "Think what it is to Me"




26


V. "And Shall I then Complain:


J > 1


28


A Prayer .....




3 1


« The Right to Die " .




33


Sunrise and Sunset :






I. Sunrise .




35


II. Sunset .




38


A Vindication .




41


One Prayer ......




46


Two Sonnets : Death




5 1


A Dedication : To John Alexander Blen


cowe .


S3



167CT



»';:



xvi CONTENTS



PAGE



Upon the Pier at Night ..... 54

A Spirit . . . . . . . .71

Miscellaneous Sonnets (1882)

Sonnet I. To Thee . . . . . , 87

II. To L. S. B 88

III. Cleopatra's Needle . . . .89

IV. To Victor Hugo. .... 90
V. On Reading " Les Contemplations ' of

Victor Hugo . . . . 91

VI. Victor Hugo's return to France in 1870 92
VII. Wordsworth's Sonnets on Capital Punish-
ment ...... 93

VIII. Louis Bonaparte . . . , 94
IX. The Twentieth Century . . -95
X. " If Ever, Roused by some Invader's

Tread ' . . . . . .96

XI. The City of the Dead ... 97

XII. Rossetti and Longfellow ... 98

XIII. England and Italy .... 99

XIV. Art 100

XV. The Song-Bride 101

XVI. The Speech of the Dead Man . .102

XVII. The World's Model . .103





CONTENTS


XVIII.


The First Kiss


XIX.


The Last Kiss


XX.


My Island .


XXI.


Our Love-Legacy


XXIL,


XXIII. "Thou art the


XXIV.


The Mirage-River


XXV.


First Love .


XXVI.


New Lands, New Poets


XXVII.


Lost Riches


XXVIII.


Even in Hell



Same



XVI 1



PAGE





104




105




106




107




108




1 10




1 1 1




I 12




113




. II4



Sonnets (1876, 1877)



Sonnet I. " Out of Place " and " In Place "
II. To «TOU"

III. Pain's Purpose ....
IV.. The One Star ....
V. « I See for Thee "...
VI. A Red Sea-weed (A New Year's Gift)
VII. Another Hill ....
VIII. " More, more, had I the Power '
Spiritual Passion : Two Sonnets
The Bridegroom of Venus ....
The Death of London .....



"7

118

119
120
121
122
123
124
125
127
132



XV111



CONTENTS



God and the Sun .......

My Sea-Birds .......

Three Sonnets :

I. On the proposed Channel Tunnel .
II. Written after seeing Madame Sarah Bern-
hardt, as Dona Sol, in Victor Hugo's
" Hernani "
III. Leon Gambetta

To a Young American Lady.

Sonnet : To Philip Bourke Marston

Written on a Warm Day in December .

A Singer's Epitaph ....

Queen Beauty .....

Life and Death .....

In Town at the End of a London Season

The Flowers' Flight ....

Two Sonnets :

I. Sinkat .....
II. Sinkat and Mr. Gladstone

One Look ......

To a Face ......

Sonnet : Many Loves, yet each Intense

Wordsworth and the Modern School

A Song of the Earth ....

Unity in Complexity .



PAGE

H3

i47





148




149




150




*S3




J 54




l S7




160




162




166




169




i73




. 174




• J 75




. 178




. 181




. 182




. 184




. 189



CONTENTS



XIX



To J. A. B. .

God's Judgment-Day
Winged Love



Sonnets from the Arabic (1884)



Sonnet I.


The Moon-Rival .


.


213


II.


The Highest Love


. .


214


III.


" We cannot save one


another from






Death" .


• • m


215


IV.


A Sudden Pang .


• * •


216


V.


Genius and Womanhood


• • •


217


VI.


Thy Name .





218


VII.


" It seems so Strange "


• • »


219


VIII.


My Winged Messengers


• •


220


IX.


Sadness


• • i


221


X.


Love's Might


• * i


222


XI.


Rest ....


♦ • I


223


XII.


The Sting of Death


• • t


224


XIII.


" Love Alone " .


. ,


225


XIV.


Love and Sympathy


• •


226


XV.


" The Grey Dawn "


• • i


227


XVI.


"Perhaps one Love unites All" .


228


XVII.


" And now the Sad Thoi


aght " .


229


XVIII.


" If I Die First "


« *


. 230



PAGE
194
I98

207



x\



CONTENTS



XIX. " Just one Star " .
XX. "Rest at Last" .
The Deep Love
Sonnet : Without and Within



PAGE
231
232

2 33

234



I.
II.

III.

IV.

V.

VI.

VII.

VIII.



Autumn Voices



Sonnets and Lyrics (1883)



Seven Years Ago.
To and P. B.



M.



On Reading " Wind-Voices," by

Bourke Marston
To P. B. M.

—"Waits till the Ship, &c."
To P. B. M. In Mid-Stream
The Light of Battle, and the Li

Love ....
An Ideal Poet



A Hymn of Immortality



Philii



ht of



237

240

241

242

243
244

245
246

247



LOVE-LYRICS (1882)



VOL. IV



FOR EVER AND EVERMORE



The woods are no less rich for all the flowers within them,

But richer, richer far :
The pine-leaves stoop above the daisies and would win them ;

They kiss each white small star.



ii.



The world is no less rich for all the songs within it,
But far more heavenly-sweet.

No nightingale can hush the happy homely linnet ;
God hears its soft " tweet, tweet."



FOR EVER AND EVERMORE



III.



The skies are no less blue because the gold stars fill them ;

Nor are the hills less bright
When wings on wings of breeze on breeze caress and thrill
them

With lavish love and light.



IV.



The shores are no less glad when breaker after breaker
With soft light laugh of glee

Charges along the sand and fills gold acre on acre
With foam-pearls from the sea.



v.



And so the heart of man is nobler for caresses

That fashion life anew.
What lightens with young joy the solemn pine's dark tresses?

The clear sky glistening through.



FOR EVER AND EVERMORE



VI.



The more the spirit loves, the richer is the spirit, —

So self-love crawls not in.
When we win one sweet love, that moment our souls merit

Another love to win !



VII.



Star elboweth star throughout the blue fields without number
Wherethrough their cohorts wheel :

And eyes on eyes pervade our hearts and thrill our slumber,
And lips on lips appeal !



VIII.



Roses on roses redden leagues on leagues sweet-smelling ;

Foam-bells on foam-bells shine :
And in God's world are women sweet beyond all telling ;

Lips countless and divine.



FOR EVER AND EVERMORE



IX.



More than the stars are they in number, and far sweeter
Than fields the May-winds tread :

Beyond the praise of bard's most passionate honeyed metre
And all words Love has said.



x.



Like hosts on hosts of angels wait they at the portal

Of life : we never know
What glance sent straight from heaven, impassioned and
immortal,

A new day's light will show.



XL



Beyond all dreams are they in beauty and in number :
The tired heart sinks to sleep, —

But through the golden aisles and marble courts of slumber
Flash glances new and deep.



FOR EVER AND EVERMORE



XII.



If thou dost gather a rose, there will be still carnations

By next day's garden-beds !
Thou hast won a love ? Yet new loves bring thee sweet


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