George Bernard Harris.

Memories of San Francisco legal practice and State and Federal courts, 1920s - 1960s : oral history transcript / and related material, 1980-1981 online

. (page 17 of 18)
Online LibraryGeorge Bernard HarrisMemories of San Francisco legal practice and State and Federal courts, 1920s - 1960s : oral history transcript / and related material, 1980-1981 → online text (page 17 of 18)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


\ fc ->

(9)




205

The Court concluded that the articles in the
Texas paper were unfair reporting of what had








, but did not achieve such likely interference

j5^|ji_tne judicial process PS to constitute themselves
i.^^^^tenptuous, "* The Court observed that inaccuraoies^in

"- ,V* " - . " _ . . - . : .-

reporting are cocnonplace and should not be the basis for
making the reporter guilty of contenpt. It suggested that
unless reporting were so designed and executed as, to
poison the public mind and lead to a Harch on the Courthouse
and thus Imperil the proper function of the^ Judicial r |*

process, writings do not achieve the stature of cpritenpt-

* ; -. *> :" - - ^C- : "~ . . ;*Si.i

uous reporting* Strong and intemperate language, which

constitutes unfair criticism, receives the protection of
the constitutional safeguard of freedom of the press.

A Judj^e is deeoed to be one who Is not too sensitive to
the winds of public opinion- a man who is able to stand
up and apply the law without fear or favor. r , -";/ .. ....

In the Pennekamp case, the court refused to hold
contemptuous editorial writing in a Florida paper f .the

. . $3&&$<r

"Miami Herald^" despite the fact that its reporting and

I _ ^ t^: -.

corsaent were inaccurate, misleading, and unfair^- The

; .-r*s&" - \- " : -^: : * ^^ ^ . **

paper criticized the dismissal of certain criminal Indict
ments and suggested that the Court was not interested in
protecting the public ngainr-t dangerous criminals. The

j&\$tcont J " " ! """ .. .. ^ "^^^^"-

^*-**-ilt to say upon which side the alleged ^offinse- -^^^
*#rm* - *!:^- wo tninic tiie specific freedoa of public comient- ^?^"
j^^^pMld weigh heavily against a possible tendency to - *-^"""
H-;- Influence pending cases. Freedom of discussion should be
given the widest range conpatible with the essential re-
quireaents of the fair and orderly adninistration of

.lustico.** . : . :



justice,



"



f.-




206

^-

paper was, or should have been, cognizant of the fact

- " -._ ~1~?" : - ^ - \ ~"
that the prosecutor himself had agreed that the indlotaents





... .. ..-.-.-.;"-, -V .- . ,. . -.:. -..-..y.i,- ^.^.,: -

were faulty and should have "been quashed and the further V-

;\:; -^
that the defendants were immediately re-indicte<

- - -^
The Supreme Court held that such, deficient



t^r^fi
misleading reporting did not establish a clear and present

danger to the administration of Justice and hence did not

warrant a holding of contempt. A judge is supposed to

- - -... - - - -; 1

hare more than ordinary fortitude and is supposed to be



able to withstand attacks and criticism,




distorted and unjust, and to decide cases according:; to

** *

,-,..- i -i/^.- ,. . - . ^^21

the law. The editorials and reporting in question were





considered less than sufficient to move judges from ful
filling their proper functions.

In the Bridges case, supra, it may be recalled
that the Los Angeles Times and Harry Bridges were both in
volved in a contempt action which arose by reason of
articles and telegrams, conn en ting on a labor case before
the trial court had made its ultimate decision* The
newspaper had urged the Court to deny probation to defend-^

> - -; ^ -^;g$*jsr*r- .;-~ csr-

ants whom it characterized as "Gorillas. 1 * Bridges sent
a telegram to the Secretary of Labor, suggesting that; af



strike might follow an adverse ruling by the trial judge
before whora the case was pending. The majority of the
^^.ygupreme Court held that under the Constitutional - : -~ 1 ^-
^freedom of the Press neither publication constltul

While both -writings were of a

* "" -1 *

to bring criticism upon Court processes, they were ncrfc of
the character which would warrant a Court In exercising its











: &S



207



^.contempt prerogative to punish those who abuse their

Q$^&fi~S? ^ ;>i

^vg^^Jnstitutional right. ^

VPJ&NiSii^jtl " < - -/.V 1 ^

The liberal protection afforded the Press isfi

WrSB " j***







- ...v.. jr. .. ^.. t;-?i5jSf^ ^>r^

accorded the radio. Such would appear to be the case in

r ~ - .-.-. : -

the light of Maryland v. Baltimore Radio Show, 67 A 2d 497,

> - = - ....
cer. den. 338 U.. S. 912, The highest court of Maryland



held that an inflammatory broadcast made by a news
reporter after the arrest of a man, charged with the mur

; : . . - : : - : <i *SJ3
>-Wv?- .. - -;.^*-^

der of a child and before indictment or trial did n

" ~ "\.-r * ""..Ttj ^i-j"^^ -

constitute contempt. The Maryland C our t expressed the




that such a broadcase did not interfere with the fair ;"^f
administration of criminal justice, despite the inciting ,-x.^^
effect of the account on listeners, fron whom a jury had
to be chosen.

Froa a review of decisions dealing with newspaper

contempt litigation, one would conclude that there is lit

* ~" .
tie protection afforded the judge. Where a conflict arises

., _ - .*.

between protecting an editor, a reporter, or a columnist ^

"



. -.

as against safeguarding the decorum and impartiality of . -7





#&&&:. &&&#

and Court, the freedom of Press concept prevails In ., ...
almost every instance. Any doubt is resolved in favor of /
the newspaper writer or - today - the radio broadcaster*
/^f&U : .3ttdh solicitude for media of expression and

; but how far should it go? It is Tital that^
be permitted to cover a trial without judicial
Tet there is danger in the abu. o^ compi-b and.
freedom - an abuse which subverts the press, misinform* the
public and weakens the independent judiciary.

ti?)





208

In the recently concluded Bridges case, the Courts;
accommodated the largest Press contingent in the history
of a court in this part of the country. It welcomed suofc^l

of representation. The Court felt that It
to perform enabling reporters to cover the

and accurately this, so the public could
informed. That the representatives of the Press were able,
conscientious, and appreciative is made madfest by the
thoroughness and general objectivity which character
ized their dally accounts of trial activities. An excerpt
from a letter received by the Court from a feature writer.

" ^

."* . "- - - \

Dick Pearce, on a morning paper will Indicate the atti
tude of the great majority of Press representatives:

.

*I have a conviction, formed over many years
of observation, about the role of a respon
sible newspaperman In a courtroom. Just as
the judge has the duty to see that the de
fendant receives a fair trial, the reporter
has the duty to see that a fair public report of
the trial Is made. In this sense the newspaper
man becomes an officer of the court as truly as
the lawyer.

Your attitude toward the press indicated to me
that you share this view. As a result of your
quiet acceptance of our occasionally sudden
comings and goings in your courtroom, and of
your recesses at certain crucial times, the
public received a much more rapid, complete
and fair account of the trial than would
otherwise have been possible.

.

In this particular trial the obligations of
all of us were greatly intensified. I share
with you the belief that those obligations
were fully met."

3&^jm - ,

wfelraess was the keynote of the local Press.




Judiciary and the reading public should be made aware
Of thia. That there were exceptions to accurate reporting
is made clear by examining excerpts from a paper of
relatively small circulation, namely, the "People s
World."

3 April 5, 1950. f]..)



-





.







Fortunately, colored and vitriolic accounts of the
proceedings were rare. The public had aj^sapla the dally
press and could judge for itself who was telling the
truth* - - ~^ : ^H

: ; :i > -tjjjS"

Westbrook Pegler f s article belongs In a
category. Here is a column of nationwide
presumably read by millions of people. These
did not have the benefit of detailed and regular reports
of proceedings as did the citizens of the^Ba^Area.
Dispatches sent by the National Press Associations were
exceedingly accurate; but they received raryln degrees
of attention, depending upon attitudes of locajr editors
and their estimate of the importance of the hews. Suffice
it to say that the Bridges case did not a chieve the care
ful and complete coverage throughout the United States
which would enable the great mass of Pegler readers to
evaluate the truthfulness or the accuracy of the
particular statements made by Pegler. Thus, iiost follow
ers of the columnist would gather that the Court and
Government prosecutor deliberately excluded from
evidence a relevant letter written by Xleanor Jfcooeevelt.
They would believe such a letter was offered byline
defense and blocked by a colluding judge and p>ecutor -
at the expense of the defendant in order to protect the
good name of the former first lady and the administration

her husband headed. It is such reporting which e
elimination, if possible, and correction in any




" - *i * .

The contempt remedy has been so weakened by Court

interpretation, designed to safeguard the freedom of the

*->. . -jr-::*"-



fee -When the ftress Collides Witk Justice* bv tfudge

8. H, Rifklnd in Uew York County Lawyers Assn Bar Bulletin

Jane 19 5O

V^gy T*3 v ^Kaiji<i^i.t. .I *^ x-.-^v^r - - - -. - .- " - - - - i. . * : - *-. - - - - - r? *?""; i <- <^wj v.i^T. X?""< -.-?- -



*#."* - - -

210 tat*1s^!

- - - ~



. - J

Press, that it la no longer an effective seana fcr
compelling a paper to check all or its facts before printing

theau Does the law of libol safeguard tSMTjnde* or

- *




The answer is very likely ^no*! It la i
difficult for a Judge to establish personal damage
himself by reason of c assent which is false or grossly "^ ^

inaccurate. As a ttatter of fact, the task of proving a

; -i - - .- . . . :
libel is EOTO burdensome and has scro requirements to

fulfill than that of establishing contempt. Unless a report

; :. 1:7

attaeka judicial integrity in such clear language as to
rsnovo all doubt In the minds of reader*, a Jud-tre baa little
hope of conducting a successful libel suit*

The courts are presented with a dileacta: How to
protect freedom of the press and at the saae tirso assure

. . , - -. ,, . - - .-

litigants, Judges, and lawyers of a fair trial, reported
accurately. Courts bend over backward to protect newspapers
even though their articles and editorials reflect on the
judiciary. &re ais leading and biased. Ihe Founding Fathers
believed that it is wiser to allow men to express
themselves freely than it is to curb their views in order
to safeguard the reputation and good nans of a Ban attacked.
The philosophy behind the Suprese Court decisions is
well put by Oliver Wendell Kolsos wherein he said:

"tfith effervescent opinions, as with the not

yet forgotten chanpagnes, tho quickest way

to let thes get flat is to let them get ftx^ww^^a^.^

^. to air." ^SP^

*- ..-^Sisafc^vT^




Judge Leon J. Tankwich, author of *!*

..*-!# - .. *

Tou Print It t n in exproaaing the tolerant attitude which ^
should be adopted, said: "By tho contrary policy we throw
over unpopular opinions the laantle of persecution and
crown then with the halo of nartyrdoa sources of growth

(15)



m



-
-




. - -

.

..211

- .- .

-

and strength which, under a policy of toleranc, would
jiot be theirs."

Let us trust that the representatives of thtf : -







estate will learn to realize more and Hore ttuRPP^ESf



.
~



responsibility which is theirs and will assume the

., .- : , . \ - -.-v* .-., - : . -

reciprocal obligations which are a cone cum it ant element of

their wide freedom of expression. !

_.." - " ** "" , f i - ^

In the "Saturday Review of Literature," June 17,
1950, under the feature "Trade Winds" there appears an : -*;

; i4jj " - - _ . - ^ : - ,". r .^.^^.-i.i/ -..; ;- ; -^ - "= ;irr:

interesting coEnaenti

*^ . ^ - . iT -*" . .!






- -

.



"Daily columnists discovered long ago that the
surest way to attract attention is to take out
a hananer and start bopping people over the head
with-it. Bvery tiiae a popular new victim is
uncovered another paper signs up for syndication
rights. In this particular line of endeavor the
voice with the snarl wins. Eow many letters a
day, for instance, do you imagine a professional
sourpuss like Pegler gets?"

I might add that I have not written to Ur*
Pegler. Hor do I intend to do so in the future.

J .

It is my hope that the views which I express nay
find their -way into a responsible working press and
re-affirm therein a consciousness of the obligation which
is so readily accepted by most of our outstanding report
ers, columnists and editorial writers.





&SBS&3&



.-



- .-







- " ^OR




- "^^^^fe :






212

Appendix B



CLOSING REMARKS OF UNITED STATES DISTRICT
JUDGE GEORGE B. KARRIS ON THE OCCASION OF
THE SAN FRANCISCO BAR ASSOCIATION DINNER
ON OCTOBER 28, 1970, FAIRMONT HOTEL

I HAVE OFTEN THOUGHT THAT THE RICHEST GIFT A MAN MAY HAVE,

IS THE ESTEEM AND AFFECTION OF HIS FELLOW MAN. TONIGHT TRULY

IS AN INSPIRING EXPRESSION OF AFFECTION AND FRIENDSHIP.

IN ACCEPTING THE HONORS ACCORDED THIS EVENING, I DO SO WITH
AN ABIDING SENSE OF HUMILITY. I AM MINDFUL THAT THERE IS A
SYMBOLISM IMPLIED IN THE TRIBUTE WHICH THE SAN FRANCISCO BAR
ASSOCIATION AND OUR FRIENDS HAVE TENDERED.

/

I SHOULD LIKE TO ACKNOWLEDGE THE ACCOLADE AS ONE PAID TO OUR
FEDERAL COURTS, AS A WHOLE.

WHATEVER I HAVE DONE AS AN INDIVIDUAL COULD NOT HAVE BEEN
ACCOMPLISHED WITHOUT THE INSPIRATION, DEVOTION AND INTENSE
COOPERATION OF MY DISTINGUISHED FRIENDS AND COLLEAGUES
OVER THE YEARS.

AS I LOOK OVER THE VISTA OF HAPPY FACES IN THIS GREAT DINING
HALL, I SEE MANY OLD AND DEAR FRIENDS - LAWYERS I HAVE KNOWN
SINCE 1926 WHEN I STARTED TO PRACTICE. ALSO, MANY NEW, FRESH,
VIGOROUS FACES APPEAR ON THE SCENE. IT IS HEARTENING TO NOTE
THE PRESENCE OF SO MANY OF OUR YOUNGER MEMBERS OF THE BAR,
WHO ARE DESTINED TO AND MUST CARRY VERY HEAVY BURDENS IN
MEETING THE CHALLENGES AND DYNAMICS OF A RAPIDLY CHANGING
SOCIETY.

TIME LIMITATIONS FORECLOSE AN OPPORTUNITY TO SINGLE OUT FOR
PERSONAL RECOGNITION ALL THOSE WHO CONTRIBUTED SO LARGELY IN
ACHIEVING THIS BEAUTIFUL TRIBUTE. I HAVE MAD AN OPPORTUNITY EARLIER
THIS EVENING TO EXPRESS APPRECIATION TO MANY OF OUR FRIENDS DURING
THE RECEPTION PRECEDING THE DINNER. PLEASE ACCEPT MY LASTING
THANKS AND GRATITUDE, PARTICULARLY THE VIGOROUS COMMITTEE UNDER
CHARLES SCULLY S DIRECTION.

IN ORDER TO BRING INTO FOCUS THE COLORFUL EVENTS OF TONIGHT,
MAY I RETURN VERY BRIEFLY TO MY INDUCTION CEREMONIES AS A
UNITED STATES DISTRICT JUDGE ON JULY 17, 1946 !



213 *






AS I RE-READ THE TRANSCRIPT OF THE PROCEEDINGS I WAS AGAIN
REMINDED OF THE ETERNAL VALUES OF FRIENDSHIP.

MANY -PERSONS HERE TONIGHT WERE ALSO PRESENT WHEN I ENTERED
THE PORTALS OF THE FEDERAL COURT:

CHIEF JUSTICE PHIL GIBSON, RETIRED, WHO PLAYED AN
IMPORTANT ROLE IN MY CAREER, WAS PRESENT THEN AS HE
IS TONIGHT.

MR. JUSTICE TOM CLARK, RETIRED, ASSOCIATE JUSTICE OF THE
SUPREME COURT, WHO PLAYED AN EQUAL ROLE, IS AGAIN WITH ME.

ALSO, RUDOLF FRIML, WHO GRACES THE HEAD TABLE, WAS
RECOGNIZED BY THE LATE AND DISTINGUISHED JUDGE ST. SURE, THE1
PRESIDING. HE SAID:

"I REFER TO MR. RUDOLF FRIML, WHOM WE ALL

KNOW AT LEAST BY REPUTATION, AND WHOSE MUSIC

WE ALL LOVE. HE IS HERE TODAY TO PAY HIS

HOMAGE TO HIS FRIEND, AND TO CONGRATULATE HIM

ON HIS ASCENDENCY TO THE FEDERAL BENCH." ******

INDUCTIONS AND CEREMONIES OF THIS KIND ARE INEVITABLY COUPLED
WITH GREAT EMOTIONAL SURGE. WHAT I THEN SAID TWENTY- FOUR
YEARS AGO AT THE CLOSE OF THE INDUCTION CEREMONIES, COULD VERY
WELL BE REPEATED TONIGHT:

"SOMEONE ONCE SAID THAT A FEDERAL JUDGE
MUST FIRST BE TESTED IN CRUCIBLES OF FIRE
AND THEN, HAPPILY ENOUGH, HE IS WELDED IN AND
BY THE LOVE AND COMPANIONSHIP OF HI? FRIENDS." *****

THE LOVE AND COMPANIONSHIP OF MY FRIENDS AREAGAIN MANIFEST
TONIGHT.

*****

THE COURTHOUSE SHADOWS LENGTHEN AS WE COME TO THE CLOSE
OF A JUDICIAL JOURNEY WHICH COMMENCED IN THE SAN FRANCISCO
MUNICIPAL COURT IN 1941 - 29 YEARS AGO.



214



THE EXPERIENCES HAVE BEEN RICH AND CHALLENGING, PARTICULARLY
THOSE IN THE OLD HALL OF JUSTICE; THE ASSOCIATIONS WITH
FELLOW JURISTS AND THE MEMBERS OF THE BAR AFFORDED A
CONSTANT SOURCE OF INSPIRATION AND GUIDANCE.

THERE IS A SLENDER THREAD THAT IS WOVEN INTO THE FABRIC OF
JUDICIAL LIFE, - THE SLENDER THREAD OF CIRCUMSTANCE.

THERE WAS A SLENDER THREAD OF CIRCUMSTANCE THAT IMPELLED ME
TO FOLLOW THE LAW, DISCERNIBLE IN RETROSPECT AMID ALL THE
WORKINGS OF PROVIDENCE, THE TRICKS OF DESTINY AND THE DICE-
CASTS OP FATE WHICH BROUGHT ME TO THE BENCH.

WE SIMPLY ARE NOT ELEVATED TO THE FEDERAL BENCH, OR ANY
BENCH, BY THE DIVINE RIGHT OF KINGS (ALTHOUGH SOME BELIEVE
IT) ; NOR ARE WE ANOINTED WITH ANY GREATER INTELLIGENCE,
INSIGHT OR ACUTENESS, AS COMPARED WITH THE MANY ABLE
PRACTITIONERS BEFORE US. FORTUNATELY, WE ARE OFTEN INSPIRED
TO GREATER HEIGHTS BY THE ASSOCIATION, GUIDANCE AND DIRECTION
OF SOME COLLEAGUE OR JURIST; - SUCH A JURIST WAS LEARNED
HAND ....

SOME YEARS AGO I WAS CONCLUDING A VERY LENGTHY ANTITRUST
CASE, UNITED STATES v. AMERICAN CAN. MY CHAMBERS IN THE
FOLEY SQUARE COURTHOUSE, NEW YORK, ADJOINED THOSE OF
JUSTICE HAND. IN THE LATE AFTERNOON, AFTER COURT SESSIONS,
WE WOULD OFTEN VISIT, - A RARE PRIVILEGE FOR ME. HIS
DELIGHTFUL HUMOR, REFRESHING VIEWS ON ANY SUBJECT, AND KEEN
PERCEPTION, AFFORDED A PLEASANT CONTRAST AFTER THE LENGTHY
HEARINGS .

LEARNED HAND, A TRULY LEGENDARY FIGURE, USUALLY ENTERED ON
A WIDE RANGE OF CONVERSATIONS, CENTERED ON EVERY CONCEIVABLE
SUBJECT, INCLUDING THE NEW YORK THEATRE, GILBERT AND
SULLIVAN, POETRY, PHILOSOPHY AND ANY OTHER AVAILABLE SUBJECT
WHICH MET HIS FANCY.

OVER THE YEARS, I HAVE FOUND A SOURCE OF COMFORT AND
INSPIRATION IN RE-READING AND RE-AFFIRMING HIS ELOQUENT AND
MOVING TEXT IN THE "SPIRIT OF LIBERTY." THE TEXT, IN PART,
IS MEMORABLE AND PARTICULARLY APT IN THESE SORRY, TRYING,
PARLOUS TIMES:



215



"AND WHAT IS THIS LIBERTY WHICH MUST LIE IN

THE HEARTS OF MEN AND WOMEN? IT IS NOT THE

RUTHLESS, THE UNBRIDLED WILL; IT IS NOT FREEDOM

TO DO AS ONE LIKES. THAT IS THE DENIAL OF LIBERTY,

AND LEADS STRAIGHT TO ITS OVERTHROW. A SOCIETY

IN WHICH MEN RECOGNIZE NO CHECK UPON THEIR

FREEDOM SOON BECOMES A SOCIETY WHERE FREEDOM

IS THE POSSESSION OF ONLY A SAVAGE FEW; AS WE HAVE

LEARNED TO OUR SORROW.

"WHAT THEN IS THE SPIRIT OF LIBERTY?
I CANNOT DEFINE IT; I CAN ONLY TELL YOU MY
OWN FAITH. THE SPIRIT OF LIBERTY IS THE SPIRIT
WHICH IS NOT TOO SURE THAT IT IS RIGHT; THE SPIRIT-
OF LIBERTY IS THE SPIRIT WHICH SEEKS TO
UNDERSTAND THE MINDS OF OTHER MEN AND WOMEN:
THE SPIRIT OF LIBERTY IS THE SPIRIT WHICH
WEIGHS THEIR INTERESTS ALONGSIDE ITS OWN
WITHOUT BIAS; THE SPIRIT OF LIBERTY REMEMBERS THAT
NOT EVEN A SPARROW FALLS TO EARTH UNHEEDED; THE
SPIRIT OF LIBERTY IS THE SPIRIT OF HIM WHO, NEAR
TWO THOUSAND YEARS AGO, TAUGHT MANKIND THAT
LESSON IT HAS NEVER LEARNED, BUT HAS NEVER QUITE
..FORGOTTEN; THAT THERE MAY BE A KINGDOM WHERE
THE LEAST SHALL BE HEARD AND CONSIDERED SIDE BY
SIDE WITH THE GREATEST." ******

*****

THE LADY WHO HAS STOOD SHOULDER TO SHOULDER WITH ME - IN
GOOD DAYS AND BAD DAYS - WHO GAVE ME ADVICE, COMFORT,
UNDERSTANDING AND COMPANIONSHIP - IS STILL BESIDE ME AS
WE ENTER ANOTHER PHASE OF OUR CAREERS, ON THIS JUDICIAL
JOURNEY.

(Aileen is escorted to rostrum
by Bill Ferdon, M.C. After bow,
George and Aileen resume seats.)



CLOSE



BENEDICTION - RABBI ALVIN FINE



216

Appendix C -"River Lights / prose poem by Judge George Harris, which appeared
in The Skipper, December 1965.



There is poetry in the peace and contentment,

That comes with the twilight hours

When dusk settles

And the day s sailing is done.

Lights come up in the cabins

As the muted notes of river life

Rise in a dissonant symphony

A strange lonesomeness

Pervades the tranquil scene.

The romance and beauty of river lights,
A tapestry of color and harmony
Spreads out before the yachtsmen,
Illuminating their lives and spirits
As arm in arm they wander
O er this island

To raise a glass in toast to friendship
and to our sailors who have sailed away.

Old regatta contests and protests

Are revived, others set at rest;

Tall tales are told

and glamorous stories

Of past victories recounted.

New and enduring companionships

Are formed with the aristocracy

Of true sportsmanship the enduring theme.

May there always be an island in our lives

Where we may pause

For a spell in calm waters,

Recount our blessings, spiritual and physical;

Take inventory of our gear and supplies,

And provision for a new cruise

In life s rough stream.

Shadowy, silhouetted

Let the river tights

And the majestic pageantry of color and music

Remind us of the beauty in our lives

And the eternal values of friendship.



(je.oJi.c.e. B.



217



Appendix D







: ,_* .-.fV, :-.-.

"V"". - -:A- x? iv
. -. .; - ~,*r* - -. "WutpfA



"



"




"



SCATTERED LEAVES
George Harris - Sire

Bohemian Grove
July 13- 1956-

SOMEWHERE BETWEEN HEAVEN AND EARTH



/. , ~.:-,jt-



"




BOHEMIANS *



- ., ...- .;.$>
- * ^imi



v ^



RUB THE STAR DUST FROM YOUR EYES,

AND GAZE UPON THE HEAVENS,

YOUR ETERNAL HOME,

NESTLE CLOSELY IN MOTHER EARTH

WITH SCATTERED LEAVES, FOR A BLANKET UPON YOU,

DREAM - DREAM - CHILDLIKE, DREAMS,

LEAVE BEHIND YOU IN THE MARKET PLACE

RANCOUR, ILL-WILL AND PREJUDICE

IN THIS FOREST PRIMEVAL

LET YOUR SOULS BATHE

IN THE WATERS OF FORGETFULNESS

SOMEWHERE BETWEEN HEAVEN AND EARTH



. - zu V-. - -. i"i*V" J

-:>:-;". -"7;r*s



- - * - - *". -
. V-




,

. . - , X i^J*-.
-*. V^t^ 1 -






-




IN THE WARMTH OF BROTHERLY LOVE
SAY WITH YOUR HEARTS, NOT YOUR LIPS
WHAT MORE FOR A MAN THAN THESE?
WHAT MORE THAN MUSIC AND STORY

LAUGHTER AND SONG?
SOMEWHERE BETWEEN HEAVEN AND EARTH

WHEN MIDSUMMER 1 S SONG IS ENDED
AND LAUGHTER IN THE FOREST IS STILLED
RETURN THEN YOU MORTALS, TO YOUR HOMES
WITH A SONG, - ONE MORE SONG IN YOUR HEARTS
WITH LYRICS BORN IN THE LOVE OF MAN FOR MAN
SOMEWHERE BETWEEN HEAVEN AND EARTH



SE, THEN, ARE THE SCATTERED LEAVES OF REMEMBRANCE!
SONG IN THE FOREST -

STRAINS OF MUSIC IN THE TREES
LAUGHTER OF MEN IN THE TWILIGHT HOURS,

ARM IN ARM THEY WIND THEIR WAY
FROM CAMP TO CAMP - - -
TO TELL A STORY, TO RAISE A GLASS

IN TOAST TO BOHEMIA S FELLOWSHIP -
THESE ARE THE THINGS TO REMEMBER -
THE SCATTERED LEAVES OF YESTERYEAR!



V ^

...



" - ." , - . - ."

. *" . . -

-

: -

- .-. . .



,
.




218



.-. , .
. "-



Si/a



~ -J - ",- : ^.r.-



^7 -??-* ^JU "ft t

^i^s^f
^"^S^x^







I



if



LONG AFTER THE LIGHTS ARE DOWN ON THE LAST SHOW
LONG AFTER THE CAMPS ARE CLOSED AND THE GROVE
RETURNED TO THE TENDER CARE OF NATURE - -
THE FRIENDSHIPS FORMED CONTINUE ON AND ON,
IN DEPTH AND LASTING MEMORY.



-



j





$&&$


*rvi



219



INDEX Judge George B. Harris



Actor s Workshop, 31

Aikens , Bronte, 44

American Bar Association, Code of Conduct, 1973, 36

American Can Company, 171

American President Line, 147

American Society of Composers & Performers (ASCAP) , 53

Ames, Alden, 100

antitrust cases, 66-69, 158-160, 167-174

Arbuckle, Fatty, 73

Atherton investigation, 1937, 95

Aureguy, Eugene, 62



Bagely, Jim, 47

bar assocation, 102-103, 123, 125

bar examinations, 41-42

Beadle, Philander, 145, 147-148, 150

Ben Blue v. The California Division of Corporations and the Commissioner

of the Department of Investments, 74-75
Bergson, Herbert, 164
Berrescal, Bessie, 28
Biggs, John, 175, 177

Blue, Ben, 73-74

Blyth-Witter Company, 19-20

Bohemian Club, 41, 51, 174

bootlegging, 160-162

Brady, Matthew, 82, 94-96

Bridges, Harry, 1947 trial, 57, 74, 175, 179-187

Brown, Edmund G., Sr. , 40-41, 81-82, 192



California, state

court administration, 85-86
California Lawn Tennis Club, 19
Carter, Jesse, 138
Carter, Oliver, 138, 152
Casey, Michael, 12

Catholic education, 9, 13-17, 25-29, 33-34
Chaplin, Charles, divorce case, 39, 60-61, 73
Chessman, Caryl, 192
China Dray, The, 6
Chinese, in San Francisco, 6-8

Christian brothers, school in S.F., 9, 13, 14, 16, 17, 25, 33
Clark, Tom, 122, 124



220



Comstock, Arizona, 73

Conlon, Jimmy, 101

Continental Can Company, 171-173

court administration, California state, 85-86

courts, justice, 86, 94


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 17

Online LibraryGeorge Bernard HarrisMemories of San Francisco legal practice and State and Federal courts, 1920s - 1960s : oral history transcript / and related material, 1980-1981 → online text (page 17 of 18)