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George E. (George Edward) Cokayne.

State of the peerage of Ireland, at and since the time of the Union, 1801 to 1888. Also, list of the Knights of St. Patrick, at and since the institution of that order, 1783 to 1888 online

. (page 1 of 8)
Online LibraryGeorge E. (George Edward) CokayneState of the peerage of Ireland, at and since the time of the Union, 1801 to 1888. Also, list of the Knights of St. Patrick, at and since the institution of that order, 1783 to 1888 → online text (page 1 of 8)
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1135678



GENEIALOGY COL.L.ECTiON



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY



3 1833 00859 4605



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STATE OF THE

(peerage of .Irefanb^

AT AND SINCE THE TIME OF THE UNION.
1801 to 18.88.



list 0f tb^ Inigbts 0f ^t. f atrick,

AT AND SINCE THE INSTITUTION OF THAT ORDER,
1783 to 1888.



G. E. Cc



k

From The Genealogist (New Series) vol. v, 1888, ed. by W. D. .Selby

LONDON : GEORGE BELL AND SONS.
EXETER : WILLIAM POLLARD & Co., PRINTERS, NORTH STREKT.



1135678



%\}t i^eerage of 3(relanti.

Some remarks on its state at and Since the Union, 1st January 1801,
together with an appendix containing the following tables,



Viz.

Table I. Peerages^ existing at the
time of the Union (1 Jan. 1801), ar-
ranged according to their j'i'ccedence, and
continued to the present date (31 Dec.
1887), showing not only the names and
the number of each rank existing at
those two periods, but also those who
then held, or noio hold, an hereditary-
Peerage in the House of Lords, together
with those who at the present date (being
88 in all) are Peers of Ireland alone.

Table II. Peerages^ existing at the
time of the Union, of which the creation
was anterior to the accession of George
III (the then reigning monarch) ; ar-
ranged (chronologically) according to the
date of the most ancient 'peerage enjoyed
by the then Peer.

Table III. Peerages^ which at the
time of the Union were held, suo jure,hj
Females ; arranged according to their
in-ccedence.

Table IV. Peerages^ extinct since
the date of the Union, shewing the ex-
tinction of all peerages held by the same
person, of which the patents were dis-
tinct ; arranged chronologically.

Table V. Peerages^ whiuli existed
separately at the time of the Union, but



which have since merged into higher or
more ancient titles; arranged chrono-
logically.

Table VI. Peerages^ created since
the Union, with the names of the three
Peerages on whose extinction they were
created in accordance with the Act of the
Union ; arranged chronologically.

Table VII. " Promotions " {i.e. Peer-
ages^ conferred on those who already
held a Peerage) made since the Union ;
arranged chronologically.

Table VIII. Peerages^ which at the
time of the Union were united with
Peerages of England or of Great Britain ;
as also Peerages^ which since that date
have become united therewith or with
Peerages of the United Kingdom ; ar-
ranged chronologically in the order of
such their Union.

Table IX. List of Irish Representa-
tive Peers since the Union ; arranged
chronologically.

Table X. List of the Knights of the
Order of St. Patrick from the institution
of that Order, 5 Feb. 1783.

Index to the title of each Peerage and
the surname of each Peer mentioned in
the above Tables.

Had the Union between tlie Kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland
been carried out (as was the case in the Union Avith Scotland), without
any sjyicial power having been retained for creating (or " promoting ")
any Irish Peerage, such creations (or "promotions") would ipso facto
have come to an end, when there no longer existed a separate Kingdom
OF Ireland, to which such future peerages could refer, but only one
Kingdom, viz., that of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and
Ireland. In this way the creation of Peers of Great Britain, which
by the Irish Union no longer existed as a separate kingdom, did actually
at that date so terminate. But for such special (and most undesirable)



' All Peerages spoken of in this article are to be considered as Peerages of the
Kingdom of Ireland unless otherwise specified.



Z THE PEERAGE OF IRELAND.

l)o\ver, the numbor of Irish Peers witliout hereditary seats in the House
of Lords would at this tune (1887) have been but 76, in lieu of 88, ^
or, deducting the 28 Representative Peers, 48 in lieu of 60.^ This
result, however, was prevented by the then Monarch (George III) insist-
ing upon retaining the (since the Union) useless and hurtful prerogative
of creating Peers of a Kingdom that had ceased separately to exist.
The matter ended in a compromise between the King and the
Ministry, whereby special dames were introduced in the Act for the
Union to enable the Crown to continue under certain limitations, the
creation and " promotion " of Irish Peerages ; which clauses, being at
once obscure in themselves and pernicious in their tendency, have, it is
trusted, a fair prospect of being shortly repealed.

In the " Gentleman's ]\[agazine " for October and November 1855,
are two articles by the late Mr. John Gough Nichols, its accomplished
Editor, (relating especially to the then recent creation of the Barony of
Permoy, hereafter alluded to) which articles put the whole matter, as to
the power reserved for the creation and " promotion " of Irish Peerages
after the Union, in a very clear light. Free use is here made of both
these articles and the following is an extract therefrom : —

" The Fourth Article of Union between the Kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland
contains the regulations under which the Peers of Ireland were in future to sit in
parliament, and under which the Crown was to ' create peers of that part of the
United Kingdom, and to make promotions in the peerage thereof.'

' To make promotions in the peerage thereof '—an expression certainly inappro-
priate and incongruous when viewed with eyes that have studied in the pages of
Dugdale, Cruise, and Nicolas. It looks as if it had emanated from the War Office
or the Admiralty, rather than the College of Arms. When a Captain is promoted
to a Majority he ceases to l)e a Captain, when a Major is promoted to a Lieutenant-
Colonelcy he ceases to be a Major, and when a Colonel becomes a general officer he is
no longer styled Colonel, — though then, and never till then, he may be Colonel of a
regiment. But when a Baron is made a Viscount he does not lose his Barony ; when
an Earl is raised to a Marquessate he is both a Marquess and an Earl ; and when a
Marquess is elevated to the highest grade of the peerage he still retains all the
accumulated dignities that may have descended to him from his ancestors, or that
have been previously conferred upon himself.

However, the Act of Union declared —

' That it shall be lawful for his Majesty, his heirs and successors, to create Peers of
that part of the United Kingdom called Ireland, and to make promotions in thepeerage
thereof, after the Union ; '

and u])on the authority of those few words, which we have here printed in the italic
character, the successive advisers of the Crown during the present century have acted
very largely. The so-called ' promotions ' in the peerage of Ireland have been made
without stint, mero motu of the Crown ; whilst the ' new creations," understanding
by that exj^ression the elevation of commoners to the peerage, have been limited, in
pursuance of the stipulations of the same articles of Union, to one new peerage in
lieu of every three that became extinct. In order to show the whole law in this
matter we here introduce the entire clause which belongs to this subject :

' That it shall be lawful for his Majesty, his heirs and successors, to create Peers of
that part of the United Kingdom called Leland, and to m.ake promotions in the
peerage thereof, aftei- the Union ; provided that no new creation of any such peerage
shall take place after the Union until three of the peerages of Ireland which shall

^ i.e., the difference caused by the twelve Peers (possessing Peerages of Ireland
alone) created since the Union - viz., the Earl of Norbury, the Viscounts (iort and
Guillamore and the Barons Rendlesham, Castlemaine, Decies, Garvagh, Oranmore,
Dunsandle, Bellew, Fermoy and llathdonnel. This is independent of ei


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Online LibraryGeorge E. (George Edward) CokayneState of the peerage of Ireland, at and since the time of the Union, 1801 to 1888. Also, list of the Knights of St. Patrick, at and since the institution of that order, 1783 to 1888 → online text (page 1 of 8)