Copyright
George Foster Emmons.

The navy of the United States, from the commencement, 1775 to 1853; with a brief history of each vessel's service and fate online

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Online LibraryGeorge Foster EmmonsThe navy of the United States, from the commencement, 1775 to 1853; with a brief history of each vessel's service and fate → online text (page 4 of 26)
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Was a Contract built vessel, and after three years service in the Home squadron, under Comdrs. W. H. Gardner, J. R. Jarvis, and S.
Mercer, was surveyed, and condemned, as unseaworthy. Was sharp, drawing nearly twice the water aft, she did forward.

Employed principally on a survey of the Coast, under different officers. (See Survey vessels.) During the Mexican war was employed in
the Gulf of Mexico, under Lt. S. P. Lee; and since on the Coast survey under the same officer.

Employed in the Gulf of Mexico, during the Mexican war, under Comdrs. G. J. Van Brunt and H. Eagle.

" Comdrs. W. S. Walker and Lt. C. H. McBlair.

" " Comdrs. G. A. Magruder and Lt. M. Mason.

Lieuts. A. B. Fairfax and N. W. Duke.

Lieuts. T. A. Hunt, R. Semmes, and T. W. Brent.

Lieuts. T. G. Benham, J. M. Berrien, and J. J. Boyle.
" Lieuts. I. S. Sterrett, 0. S. Glisson, T. Turner, and J. F. Miller.

" Comdrs. J. Tattnall, J. P. Wilson, G. F. Pearson, and Lieuts. S. S. Lee,

D. D. Porter, C. Chauncey, G. Gansevoort, J. H. Ward, &c. First cost was $36,000; has since been lost.
Employed in the Gulf of Mexico, during the Mexican war, under Comdr. A. Bigelow ; carried 18 days fuel, 80 do. water, 75 do. provisions.

" " Lieuts. C. G. Hunter, S. Lockwood, F. A. Deas, and A. Taylor.

Employed on the Coast of California, under Lieut. J. F. Schenck, &c. See table of captures.



18



NAVY OF THE UNITED STATES. NO LONGER IN SERVICE



NAMES or VESSELS.


Class.


Guns.


Men.


Tons.


Built, purchased,
&c.


When


Cost, &c.


Sold for,
&c.


Where.


When


PETRITA


Str.


1








1846




Sunk ....


OfTAIvarado


Ib48


rain


41


3


70


400


New York. P.


1847


$85,991


23,610


Norfolk


1849


EDITH . P


II


2


25


400


Boston. P.






Lost




(1

























LAKE ONTARIO.



NAMES OF VESSELS. Class.


Guns.


Men.


Tons.


Built, purchased, When
or captured.


Engaged,
cost, &c.


Sold for,
&c.


Where.


When


ONEIDA* Brig.


14

74

44
44
44
32

24
20
18
18
16
9
10
6
2, 7f

3
3

3
2
2
2
2
2

!

14




243

2605




1809
1815

(1
II

1814

If

1813
1812
1814
u

1813
1812

((
II

1813
ii

Cl

1812
1813

1812

It


1,2,4,5,6
Building .


Sold.
J

Lost . . . y

Lost . . . )
$2,000
Captured .

$1,500


Were laid up at
Sacket s Harbor
after the war.
Generally report
ed unfit for re
pairs, in 1821,
and soon after
sold, or broken
up.

Capsized in a
squall during the
night of Aug. 10,

May 15


CT

00

o
c



;

00

1t

1

n
CO

1813J

1815
1813

1815

1813
1815

||

1821


NEW ORLEANS Ship.




Sacket s Harbor

Sacket s Harbor

< Sack. Harb., )
i $80 per ton. $

Sacket s Harbor
Sacket s Harbor
Sacket s Harbor
Sacket s Harbor
Socket s Harbor
Sacket a Harbor
Sacket s Harbor


CHIPPEWA . 2 . "




PLATTSBURG "




1748




SUPERIOR "






MOHAWK . "








GEN. PIKE "




875
593


4,5,6....
2,3,4,5,6


MADISON "


200


JEFFERSON Brig.


JONES "








SYLPH Schr .




300


5,6


HAMILTON "




1,2,3,4..
2,3,4....
1,2,3,4,5,6
1,2,3,4..

1,4,5,6..
2,5, 6..


SCOURGE 2.. "






Captured
Purc d for $5,800


GOV. TOMPKINS "




96
53

50

89

82
82
81
57
53


GROWLER "


40


Aug 10


PERT "


Purc d for $3,500
Sacket s Harbor

Purc d for $5,200
5,250
3,700
3,500




LADY OF THE LAKE "




CONaUEST "


B


1,2,3,4,5,6
2,4,5,6..
2,3,4,5,6
2,3,4,5,6
1,2,3,4..


2,540
625
1,405
155
Captured .


FAIR AMERICAN "




May 15

J
Aug 10


ONTARIO .. "




ASP 2.. "




JULIA "


40


ELIZABETH "




May 15


RAVEN. . . . \ Trans -




50


Purc d for $2,500


1813
1814




$320


May 15


( port.
RANGER Brig.






May 15










I





* Was sold in 1B15 for $1,760 and
t Guns carried when first and lost



afterwards taken into the service and armed with long 12 s.
captured.



BROKEN UP, SOLD, CAPTURED, OR DESTROYED. 19



SECOND ORGANIZATION, FROM 1797 TO 1853, INCLUSIVE.



While in command of Lt. S. B. Bissell ; officers and crew saved. See table of captures.

Employed during the Mexican war in the Gulf, under Comdrs. S. B. Wilson, W L. Harris, E. W. Carpenter, and Lt. W. L. Herndon.

Purchased by the War Department. Employed in the Gulf as a transport during the Mexican war, and at its close transferred to the Navy
Department, and sent to the Pacific, where she was finally run on shore during the night and wrecked, while in temporary com
mand of Lt. J. McCormick, U. S. N. ; officers and crew saved.



LAKE ONTARIO.



ON THE LAKES.
Exclusive of those captured from the enemy in the battles of the 10th, and llth, of Sept., 1813 and 1814, which are included in the prize list.

Was the first vessel of war built on the Lakes under the new organization, by Messrs. Bergh & Eckford, and under the superintendence
and subsequent command of Lieut. M. T. Woolsey, with an armament of 16 24 pdr. carronades ; and afterwards actively employed
during the war, under Lieut. Thos. Brown.

The first Line-of-battle ship do. Was pierced for 100 guns, but never launched. As an exception to all the others, her name still con
tinues on the Navy list, and she is reported in good condition and under cover.

Was nearly completed in one month. Was pierced for 64 guns, but never launched. Was afterwards sold on the stocks.

Only partially built at the conclusion of the war. Was afterwards sold on the stocks.

Was completed and launched in 80 days, and was the largest vessel that we ever had on the Lakes, mounting 62 guns, but subsequently

only 58. She became the flag ship of Commo. Chauncey, and took the Lake in 1814.
Was completed and launched in 34 days. The fourth frigate launched ; command given to Capt. Jacob Jones.

Was completed and launched in 63 days, and was the second frigate launched; carried 28 long 24 s. Commanded by A. Sinclair and Wm.
M. Crane. In the action of Sept. 28 burst one of her guns and sustained considerable injury, with the loss of 27 killed and wounded.

Was completed and launched in 63 days, and was the first frigate launched ; carried 24 car. 32 s. Commanded by Capt. E. Trenchard,
and afterwards Wm. M. Crane.

Was not finished until 1814, when Capt. C. G. Ridgely took command of her. Was near being lost in a gale, and obliged to throw over
board 10 guns, on her first cruise.

Was not finished until 1814, when Capt. M.T. Woolsey took command of her. Employed as a Receiving ship, several years after the war.

Was launched in 21 working days after her keel had been laid. Armed with 4 long 32 s on circles, and 12 6 s in broadside ; command
given to M r Comdt. Woolsev. Was afterwards altered to a Brig, armed with 16 24 pdr. car, and given to Capt. J. D. Elliott, in 1814.

While in command of Lieut. R. Winter, and all hands went down with her. Was ) Were carrying sail to weather the enemy s squadron,
previously in command of Lieut. McPherson. and it is supposed all hands were at their quarters,

While in command of S l Master Osgood, and all hands but 16 went down with her. > and the guns cast loose at the time.

Was commanded. by Lieut. Thos. Brown in tlie affair of the 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th, and in that of the 6th, by Lieut. Wm B. Finch, when

she had her foremast shot away.
While in command of Lieut Deacon, by the English squadron. Had previously performed valuable service under Sailingmaster M. P.

Mix in several encounters, and was subsequently recaptured by Commo. Chauncey, in the Gen l Pike, same year; and finally, in

1814, was again captured by the English at Oswego.
In the attack on Kingston burst one of her guns, which wounded her commander, Sailingmaster Arundel, who was subsequently knocked

overboard and drowned the same day.
Was at first armed with one long brass nine, on a pivot, and the command given to Sailingmaster Flinn, who was at the taking of York ;

afterwards, under Lieut. W. Chauncey, she captured the Lady Murray. Was subsequently commanded by Lieut. F. H. Gregory

and Sailingmaster Mix. After the war was commanded by Lieut. S. W. Adams, &c.
Was in command of Lt. Elliott in the affair of 1 The numbers in the column of "Cost, &c.," signify as follows :



No. 1, and afterwards Lt. J. Pettigrew.
Was commanded by Lieut. W. Chauncey.

Was commanded by S l Master J. Stevens.
Was commanded by Lieut. Smith.



No. 1. Vessels engaged in the attack on Kingston, Nov. 9,1812



2.
3.
4.
5.
6.



York (now Toronto) April 25, 1813 | Commo. Chauncey
Fork George May 25, 1813 } commanding on
with the English squadron, Aug. 7 to 11, 1813 I each occasion.

Sept. 11, 1813 I
Sept. 28, 1813 J



While in command of Sailingmaster L. Trant, by the English squadron. She had previously assisted at the attack on Kingston, York,

and Fort George, and was finally recaptured by Commo. Chauncey, in the Gen. Pike, same year.

Employed only as a Transport ) The Lady of the Lake appears to have been the only vessel left on the upper Lakes belonging

to the Navy in 1823. Barges No. 1 to 15, inclusive, were armed with one long gun and
Was formerly the " Mary," bomb vessel. ) a carronade.

Reported unworthy of repairs.



20



NAVY OF THE UNITED STATES. NO LONGER IN SERVICE



LAKE CHAMPLAIN.



NAMES or VESSELS.


Class.


Guns.


Men.


Tons.


Built, purchased,
or captured.


When


Engaged,
cost, (fee.


j

Sold for, * Where.
&c.


When


EAGLE* 2..


Sloop
tt

Ship .
Brig.
Schr.
Sloop


11
11
26
20
17
7
12
4
6
6


S112

212

150
110
30

S 350






1812
1814

((
((

1813

1814

1808to
1813

1812
1813


$80 pr. ton

ii
ii

$12,000


( Near the Isle }
Captured..! < Aux Noix, >
j ( June 3, )

Sold Whitehall


1813 |

1824
1824
1824
1815
1824
18151.
1815
1815


GROWLER* 2..




Vergennes,Vt...
ii


SARATOGA 2. .


EAGLE . . 3




ii


TICONDEROGA




,,


PREBLE




Vergennea, Vt . .
Lake Champ n 5


$2,430


6 LARGE GALLEYS


E




4 SMAT r OAT T fry?




259 :


PRESIDENT 2..


Sloop
u


}

ByWarDe


pt. 1,750 "
1,900


MONTGOMERY




(i









* The capture of these two vessels not only gave the enemy a temporary command of the Lake, but, it is supposed, induced them to
construct the fleet, that was subsequently captured by Commo. Macdonough. They were finally sold, in 1815, for about $800 each.



LAKE ERIE.



NAMES or VESSELS. Class.


Guns.


Men.


Tons.


Built, purchased, When
or captured.


Engaged,
cost, &c.


Sold for,
&c.


Where.




When


LAWRENCE Brig .


20
20
4
3
2
2
1
I
1
1
1
1






S Presque Isle, $ 1813
) or Erie. ) ;

Purchased 1812


$80 pr. ton
ii

ti
$3,700

(Cath rine)
(Contrac r)
(Amelia). .


.... r .n\re EYiA


f


NIAGARA "














ARIEL 2. . Schr.













CALEDONIA Brig.








Sold






SCORPION Schr.


35





Purchased "

i
<(


Captured .
ti


Lake Huron,
5th, of Sept.
Lake Ontario,
Aug. 12,

( Lake Huron,
I 4th, of Sept.




....

1814 (.
1814

1814 C
1814 (
1814


SOMERS "


TRIPPE Sloop




TIGRESS Schr


28





Erie
1813




PORCUPINE "


OH!O "


35






..


Captured .

Sold .


LakeOntario, )
Aug. 12, I


AMELIA "




1812
" 1815


$6,900


GHENT "




50







* Reported to have been armed with 3 long 12 pounders each, and a complement of 35 men, when captured.

At the conclusion of the war this Squadron, with the exception of two small vessels, and their prizes, (sec prize list,) were disman
tled and laid up at Erie, and all subsequently condemned, and sold ; some having been sunk, with a view to their better preservation.

Note. Independent of the foregoing list of vessels, there has been employed in the service for brief periods, and at different times, seve
ral small Steamers and Sailing craft, which have usually been hired or chartered for Special Service, and for the time placed in charge of
Officers of the Navy, who have performed valuable service that does not always appear upon the annual Register that is published ; amon;
these, I will only mention the Brigs Advance and Rescue, that were loaned to the Government by the Hon. Henry Grinnell, of New York,
officered and manned by the Government, and despatched to the Arctic sens, from New York, in search of Sir John Franklin, on the 26th
of May, 1850, under the command of Ll. J. De Haven, U. S. N., returning to the same port, in Sept. and Oct. of the following year.



BROKEN UP, SOLD, CAPTURED, OR DESTROYED.

LAKE CHAMPLAIN.



ON THE LAKES.
Exclusive of those captured from the enemy in the battles of the 10th, and llth, of Sept., 1813 and 1814, which are included in the prize list.



While in command of Lieuts. Sidney Smith and J. Loomis. By the flotilla of the enemy, aided by a detachment on shore. Received a
raking shot, which sunk her in a few minutes. She was afterwards raised, and with her consort, 3 gun boats, and some batteaux,
under Capt. T. Everard, R. N., entered Plattsburg Bay, and destroyed the Arsenal, &c. Finally, became a part of the English
squadron, that was subsequently captured by Commo. Macdonough, under the names of the " Chub " and " Finch."

This Squadron was principally constructed of green timber, at the head of navigation on Otter creek, and, like most of the Lake vessels,
hastily put together. As an evidence of this, it is only necessary to say that the timber of which the Saratoga was built, was standing
in the forest, forty days previous to her being launched. After the war, this squadron and its prizes were dismantled and laid up at
Whitehall, where they were subsequently pronounced unworthy of repair, and sold at public sale. The Galley "Allen," was in
commission several years after the war.

Was not in the action of the llth, of September, 1814. Was originally armed with 4 long 12 s and 6 18 pd r columbiads.
Was not in the action of the llth, of September, 1814. Was originally armed with 7 long 9 s and 2 18 pd r columbiads.



LAKE ERIE.



ON THE LAKES.
Exclusive of those captured from the enemy in the battles of the 10th, and llth, of Sept , 1813 and 1814, which are included in the prize list.



This Squadron was hastily got together, very much like that on Lake Cliamplain ; the two larger vessels having been built by the same
Constructors, Adam & Brown, and all obliged to receive their armament, and equipments, from the sea ports. The Lawrence and
Niagara, although of light draught, were obliged to be buoyed up by camels over two feet, before they could pass the bar at Erie.



While in Command of Lieut. Conkling, by a gig and 5 batteaux of the enemy, under Capt. A. Dobbs, R.N., in a night attack, in which the
enemy lost Capt. Ratcliffe and one Seaman, and four wounded.

While in command of S l Master Champlin, by 5 armed boats and 19 canoes, under Lieut. M. Worsley, R. N., in a night attack. The
Scorpion, under Lieut. D. Turner, was captured by a ruse de guerre, by the same party, on the following day. The enemy lost a
lieutenant and 2 men, and 7 wounded in the first affair. The Americans lost 3 men, all the officers and 3 men wounded .

While in command of S l Master McCally, (who was badly wounded,) by the same force which took the Somers, above.



NAVY OF THE UNITED STATES. NO LONGER IN SERVICE-



GUN BOATS.



No.


Guns.


Men.


Commanded by


Date.


Position.


1


2


30




September 1804




2









October 1811




3


2






. . . .1805 to 1806




5


5


36






f


23


5


39








156


5


41




December 14 1814




162


5


35


Lt R Spedden 1






163


o


31


S l Master G. Ulrick j






7


2




Lt P S Ogilvie


May 4 1805


I


Prize 8


2


28


Lt J R Caidwell


\uguet7 1804


Off Tripoli


g


2






1814




13


2






December 1809




46


1


18


Lt S. Blodget


October 29 1812


Off New Port


59


4


25




August 22 1814




62








September 16 1813


Off St. Mary s


67









September 1825




72





B

OJ


1


November 1817


Norfolk


76
95



1



>,


$


1825




121


1




S l Master Wm. Sheed


July 2 J 1813




140




ij




September 23 1814




149


3


o




November 1817




152




01




July ]815




154


3


U
q


S l Master Basset


November 1817




155




r




November 1817




159





>


S l Master Brown


October 1810


Off St. Mary s , .


160




00


S l Muster T. Paine


October 6 1814




161









September 16 1813




164






S l Master J. R. Gray son


September 16 1813


St. Mary s


166


4






June 12 1815




168


6


25


S l Master J. Hubbard


March 16 1815


Tybee Bar















Among the first Gun Boats employed in the Navy, were the six that were loaned to our squadron under Commodore Preble, by the
Neapolitan Government, to operate against Tripoli in 1804. These were 25 tons burthen, and each armed with a long 24 pounder. Add to
these two Bomb vessels of 30 tons, carrying each a 13 inch mortar, also borrowed from the Neapolitans; and 3 Gun Boats, carrying each
2 brass Howitzers and a copper gun 11 g feet long, that carried a ball weighing 29 Ibs., subsequently captured from the Tripolitans, and it
will make 9 of the latter, or 11 of both, that were employed by our Navy during this war. The first Gun Boats built for the Navy, were
under the act of the 28th of February, 1803. Nos. 2 to 10, inclusive, of these, sailed from different ports of the U. S. for the Mediterranean
in 1805, and all but No. 7, (as above related,) arrived at Syracuse within 48 hours of each other. These were long, low, and narrow built
vessels, 71 feet long by 18 feet beam, generally sloop rigged, and armed with two long 32 pounders, which they carried below during their
transit across the Atlantic. Subsequently, this species "of force was strongly recommended by President Jefferson for coast and harbor de
fence ; and in 1807, he recommended there should be 200 built for this purpose. To thin number, were added 57 in the recommendation of
the Secretary of the Navy, (Robert Smith,) in his report of the same year, who estimated their average cost in building at $5, 000; and, when
armed and equipped, at $11,000 each.



GALLEYS, OR BARGES,



Were employed in River and Harbor defence during our Revolutionary war. Some, that were built and employed by the Colonies, are
described as being 60 feet in length, by 18 feet beam, and 5 feet hold, with 7 inches dead rise ; and costing, when fully equipped, from $3,000
to $6,000 each ; the larger, armed with a long 24 pilr. and a 42 pdr. carronade, and the smaller, with a long 18 pounder, and a 32 pdr. car-
ronade. Under the former name, there were in service, in 1801, " the Charleston, South Carolina, Beaufort, St. Mary s, Savannah, Pro
tector, Gov. Williams, Gov. Davie, and the Mars."

In 1814 there were 32 equipped, besides 59 building, in the different ports of the U. S. Many of these were employed on the Lakes ;
and, at the conclusion of our war with Great Britain, were, like the Gun Boats, generally disposed of at public sale. In 1817, Capt. R. T.
Spence reports that he had under his command, on the Baltimore station, 3 Barges, each 75 feet long, 8 Barges, 50 feet long, and 3 Barges, 46
to 49 feet long, all dismantled, but in good order. There were also two more left on the New Orleans station. In 1823 and 4, five, named
the "Sand Fly, Gallinipper, Midge, Mosquito, and Gnat," were employed against the Pirates in the West Indies, in the squadron of Com
modore D. Porter. These appear to have been the last employed in our Navy, until the commencement of the Mexican war, in 1846, when
large open boats, differing both in size and construction, and called



BROKEN UP, SOLD, CAPTURED, OR DESTROYED. 23

GUN BOATS.



Was driven high and dry in a corn field on White Marsh Island. Was subsequently gotten off, and cruised on the S. coast, under Lt8.
Magrath, Murdoch, Fanning, and Biddle.

Went down in a severe gale; only two of her crew saved. Was in the Mediterranean in 1805 and 6, under Lt. R. Izard.

Where her comd r died. Returned to Charleston in July, 1806, where the others, similarly employed, returned, and were generally laid up.

This small squadron, while at anchor under the command of Lt. Jones, was attacked by 42 Launches and 3 Gigs of the enemy, under
Capts. N. Lockyer, Montressor and Roberts, R. N., and finally carried by boarding, after a most obstinate and gallant resistance of one
hour and twenty minutes, during which the Americans lost about 100 in killed and wounded, including among the latter, their com
manding officer; and the enemy, whose force was estimated nt 42 guns and 1200 men, in their official account acknowledge 17 killed,
and 77 wounded. Nos. 5 and 23 did not surrender, until several of the enemy s boats had been sunk, and the fire of some of the cap
tured Gun boats had been turned upon them.

Sailed from the U. S. for the Mediterranean; sprung her mast; returned to New York to refit; sailed again June 20th, and was never af
terwards heard from.

Blown up by a hot shot from the enemy s fort, killing her comd r, Mid n Dorsey, and 8 men. By some accounts this was Gun boat No. 9.

Capsized by a squall, and sunk with 6 of her crew. Was subsequently raised, and one of the last retained in the service at N. Y., 1828.

Condemned, and Nos. 14, 16, 17, 20, and 21, reported unfit for service on that station, having been built of green timber.

Wrecked ; the commander and 9 of his crew lost.

Burnt, to prevent falling into the hands of the enemy. Was called the " Scorpion," and had been rebuilt in 1812, at Washington.

Sunk in a gale; had previously been condemned.

Employed as a. Tender, and unworthy of much repair.

Dismantled and laid up; hulls reported sound; were in service as late as 1825. No. 72 not coppered.

Employed as a Tender.

Captured by 8 boats from the English squadron, armed with 3 guns, and 150 men ; after a sharp resistance, and the loss of 7 wounded, and
the only gun disabled. The enemy lost 7 killed, and 12 wounded.

Blew up by accident, killing 9 persons.

Laid up, and much worm eaten.

Struck by lightning, blew up, and all on board, but 3, perished.

Hull, spars, and sails, reported in good condition. In July 26th, 1816, fired the shot that blew up Fort Appalachicola, killing about one
hundred of its inmates, who were principally Spaniards, Indians, and Negroes.

Hull, spars, and sails, reported in good condition.

Lost in a gale, with all on board. No armament on board.

Captured by a sloop and 10 barges, under a Lieut., after a resistance of 20 minutes, and loss of 1 killed, and 3 wounded. The enemy s
loss, about 20 killed and wounded.

Upset and sunk in a squall, all hands saved.
" " " J9 hands drowned.

Sold for $1,825, having been sunk in Port Royal Sound the year previous, by a squall, under the name of the schooner Alligator.

While carrying despatches, was fired into and detained by the Erebus 20, Capt. Bartholomew, but subsequently released. Was also com
manded by Lieuts. McCall, J. Paine, &c., and was in service as late as 1823.



Out of the above number, there appears to have been 172 built up to 1809. These were of various dimensions, varying from 40 to 60
feet, in length, and from 50 to 100 tons, burthen ; usually sloop or schooner rigged, and armed with from 1 to 5 guns, and manned with from
20 to 50 men. The larger, frequently carrying 2 long 32 pounders, and several howitzers or swivels ; and the smaller, one long 18 or 24
pounder pivot gun.

There were doubtless some others, not mentioned in the foregoing list, that were destroyed by their own officers to prevent falling into
the hands of Che enemy during the last war with Great Britain. Two or three more were lost on the Southern Coast, with more or less of
their crews; while others, from the indifferent timber of which they were constructed, must have gone to decay ; for, as early as 1809, two
were reported as unworthy of repair. The greater number, however, remaining in service at the conclusion of the war with Great Britain,
were disposed of at public sale. By the records of the Navy Department, I see that 40 were sold at New York, in 1815, for from $220 to
(690 each.



SURF BOATS,



To the number of 150, were ordered to be built in several of the Northern Ports of the U.S., principally for the use of our Army in landing
at Vera Cruz and elsewhere. Only about 130 of these were delivered early in 1847. For the convenience of transportation to the Gulf,
in ships, they were built of 3 sizes, so as to stow in nests.



Online LibraryGeorge Foster EmmonsThe navy of the United States, from the commencement, 1775 to 1853; with a brief history of each vessel's service and fate → online text (page 4 of 26)