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ENGLISH LYRICS




D. APPLETON & CO.



/B

[ LIBRARY

1 UNIVERSITY OF
\CALIFORNIA






ENGLISH LYRICS



ENGLISH LYRICS




NEW YORK
D. APPLETON AND COMPANY

I, 3, AND 5 BOND STREET
MDCCCLXXXIV



CONTENTS.

PAGE

I. The Lover praiseth the Beauty of

his Lady's hand Sir Thomas Wyatt i

II. The Lover beseecheth his Mis-
tress not to forget his steadfast
faith and true intent .... Sir Thomas Wyatt 2

III. Complaint of the Absence of her

Lover being upon the sea . . Henry Howard^ Earl

of Surrey . . 4

IV. Amantium irae amoris redinte-

gratio est Richard Edwards . 6

V. The Lover curseth the time

when first he fell in Love . . William Hunnis . g

VI. The Lullaby of a Lover . . . George Gascoigne . n

VII. A Pastoral of Phillis and Corydon Nicholas Breton . 14

VIII. Corydon's Supplication to Phillis Nicholas Breton, . 15

IX. Olden Love-Making Nicholas Breton . 17

X. The Birth of Desire ..... Edward Vere, Earl

of Oxford ... 19

XI. My Mind to me a Kingdom is . Sir Edward Dyer . 21
XII. The Shepherd to the Flowers . Sir W. Raleigh . 24



494



i CONTENTS.

PAGE.

XIII. Dispraise of Love, and

Lovers' Follies .... Sir IV. Raleigh . . 25

XIV. A Ditty Sir Philip Sidney . 27

XV. Astrophel's Love is dead . Sir Philip Sidney . 27

XVI. Damelus' Song to his Dia-

phenia Henry Constable . 30

XVII. Madrigal Thomas Lodge . . 31

XVIII. Rosalind's Madrigal . . . Thomas Lodge . . 32

XIX. Montanus' Fancy. . . . Thomas Lodge . . 34

XX. Montanus' Praise of his fair

Phoebe Thomas Lodge . . 35

XXI. Virelay Thomas Lodge . . 37

XXII. Doron's Description of his

fair Shepherdess Samela Robert Greene . . 38

XXIII. Song Robert Greene . . 39

XXIV. The burning Babe . . . Robert Southwell . 41

XXV. Life Sir Francis Bacon . 43

XXVI. Song Samuel Daniel . . 45

XXVII. Ulysses and the Siren . . Samuel Daniel . . 46

XXVIII. Song Chris. Marlowe . 50

XXIX. The Shepherd's Song . . Anonymous ... 52

XXX. Balthazar's Song .... Wm. Shakspere . . 54

XXXI. Fairies' Song Wm. S/uikspcre . . 55

XXXII. Song Wm. Shakspere . . 56

XXXIII. Ariel's Song Wm. Shakspere . . 56

XXXIV. Serenade Wm. Shakspere . . 57

XXXV. Amien's Song. I. ... Wm. Shakspert . . 58

XXXVI. Amien's Song. II. ... Wm. Shakspere . . 59



CONTENTS. vii

PAGE

XXXVII. Feste, the Jester's Song. I. Wm. Shakspere . . 6c

XXXVIII. Feste, the Jester's Song. II. Wm. Shakspere. . 60

XXXIX. Song Wm. Shakspere . . 61

XL. Serenade . Wm. Shakspere. . 62

XLI. A Dirge Wm. Shakspere . . 62

XLI I. Youth and Age Wm. Shakspere . . 64

XLIII. The Character of a Happy

Life Sir Henry Wot ton . 65

XLIV. Song Thomas Dekket . . 67

XLV. Cornelia's Song John Webster . . 68

XLVI. The Message John Donne ... 69

XLVII. Valediction, forbiddingMourn-

ing John Donne ... 70

XLVI 1 1. A Hymn to God the Father. John Donne ... 72

XLIX. The Funeral John Donne ... 73

L. Hesperus' Song .... Benjonson ... 75

LI. Crispinus' and Hermogenes'

Song Benjonson ... 76

LII. Clerimont's Song .... Benjonson ... 77

LIII. An Epitaph on Salathiel
Pavy, a child of Queen

Elizabeth's Chapel . . Benjonson ... 77

LIV. Volpone's Song Benjonson ... 79

LV. To Celia Benjonson ... 80

LVI. A Nymph's Passion . . . Benjonson ... 81

LVII. In Celebration of Charis.

Her Triumph .... Benjonson ... 82

LVIII. The Dedication of the King's

New Cellar to Bacchus . Ben Jonson ... 84



viii CONTENTS.

PAGE

LIX. As it Fell upon a Day . . Richard Barnfield 87

LX. A Message to Phillis . . . Thomas Heywood . 89

LXI. Valerius' Song Thomas Heywood . 90

LXII. Oriana's Song ..... FletcJier& Beaumont 92

LXI 1 1. Song of the Priest of Pan . Fletcher &* Beaumont 93

LXIV. Song to Pan Fletcher & Beaumont 94

LXV. Song Fletcher & Beaumont 95

LXVI. Song Fletcher & Beaumont 96

LXVII. The Passionate Lord's Song Fletcher & Beaumont 97

LXVIII. Aspatia's Song Fletcher fy Bea umont 98

LXIX. Hippolito's Song .... Thomas Middleton 99

LXX. A Hymn Phineas Fletcher . 100

LXXI. Song Thomas Carew . . 101

LXXII. The Shepherd's Resolution George WitJur . . 103

LXXIII. The Cheat of Cupid ; or, the

ungentle Guest .... Robert Herrick . . 105

LXXIV. The Tear Robert Herrick . . 107

LXXV. To the Virgins, to make

much of Time .... Robert Herrick . . 108

LXXVI. His Poetry his Pillar . . . Robert Herrick . . 109

LXX VI I. To Music, to becalm his

Fever Robert Herrick . . no

LXX VI 1 1. To Anthea, who may com-

mand him any thing . . Robert Herrick . . 112

LXXIX. To Daffodils Robert Herrick . . 113

LXXX. The Mad Maid's Song . . Robert Herrick . . 114

LXXX I. To Blossoms Robert Herrick . . 116

LXXXII. His Prayer to Ben Jonson Robert Herrick . 117



CONTENTS. ix

PAGE

LXXXIIT. The Night-Piece, to Julia Robert Herrick . . 117

LXXXIV. A Ternary of Littles, upon
a Pipkin of Jelly sent to

a Lady Robert Herrick . . 118

LXXXV. An Ode for Ben Jonson '. Robert Herrick . . 119

LXXXVI. A Thanksgiving to God

for his House .... Robert Herrick . . 120

LXXXVII. On the Life of Man . . Henry King . . . 123

LXXXVIII. Virtue George Herbert . . 124

LXXXIX. Man's Medley .... George Herbert . . 125

XC. Bitter-sweet George Herbert . . 126

XCI. Easter George Herbert . . 127

XCII. Servant's Song .... J awes Shirley . . 128

XCI 1 1. Song of the Nuns . . . James Shirley . . 129

XCIV. Song of Calchas . . . . James Shirley . . 129

XCV. Upon the Image of Death Simon. Wastell . . 131

XCVI. Song Sir Wm. Davenant 133

XCVII. Song Edmund Waller . 134

XCVIII. Song on May Morning . John Milton. . . . 135

XCIX. The Lady's Song . . . John Milton . . . 133

C. Orsames' Song .... Sir John Suckling . 137

CI. Song Sir John Suckling . 138

CII. On the Assumption . . Richard Crasha-w . 141

CIII. ToLucasta. Going beyond

the Seas Sir Rich. Lovelace 145

CIV. To Lucasta. Going to the

Wars Sir Rich. Lovelace 146

CV. To Althea ; from Prison . Sir Rich. Lovelace 147



x CONTENTS.

?AGE

CVI. Bermudas Andrew Marvell . 149

CVII. The Retreat Henry Vaughan. . 151

CVI 1 1. Peace Henry Vaughan . 152

CIX. They are all Gone into the

World of Light .... Henry Vaughan. . 153

CX. The Relapse Thomas Stanley . 156

CXI. Song to a fair young Lady,
going out of Town in the

Spring John Dryden . . . 157

CXII. Song Sir Charles Scdley . 159

CXI 1 1. Victoria's Song Sir Charles Sedley . 160

CXIV. Love Armed Afhra Behn ... 162

CXV. Phillada Anonymous ... 163

CXVI. To a Child of Quality, five
years old. MDCCIV. The

author then forty . . . Matthew Prior . . 167

CXVII. An Ode Matthew Prior . . 168

CXVI 1 1. The Stray Nymph .... Ambrose Philips . 170

CXIX. Song Thomas Parnell . 172

CXX. Polypheme's Song .... John Gay .... 174

CXXI. Ode on Solitude Alexander Pope . 175

CXXII. The Dying Christian to his

Soul Alexander Pope . 176

CXXIII. Sally in our Alley .... Henry Carey . . . 177
CXX IV. On the Death of Mr. Robert

Levett Samuel Johnson . 180

CXXV. Ode William Collins . 182

CXXVI. On Fidele, supposed to be

Dead William Collins . 182



CONTENTS. xi

PAGE

CXXVII. Olivia's Song Oliver Goldsmith . 184

CXXVIII. To Mary William Cowper . 185

CXXIX. Life Anna L. Barbauld 188

CXXX. Song Charles Dibdin . . 190

CXXXI. Song William Blake . . 192

CXXXII. Song William Blake . . 193

CXXXI II. To the Muses William Blake . . 194

CXXX IV. Piping down the Valleys

wild William Blake . . 195

CXXXV. The Tiger William Blake . . 196

CXXXVI. She dwelt among the Un-
trodden ways ..... Wm. Wordsworth . 198

CXXXVII. To the Cuckoo .... Wm. Wordsworth . 198

CXXX VIII. She was a Phantom of

Delight Wm. Wordsworth . 200

CXXXIX. A Slumber did mySpirit seal Wm. Wordsworth . 201

CXL. I wandered Lonely as a

Cloud Wm. Wordsworth . 202

CXLI. The Solitary Reaper . . Wm. Wordsworth . 203

CXLII. Fitz-Eustace's Song . . Sir Walter Scott . 205

CXLI 1 1. Song Sir Walter Scott . 206

CXLI V. Lucy Ashton's Song . . Sir Walter Scott . 207

CXLV. Song Sir Walter Scott . 208

CXLVI. Flora's Song Sir Walter Scott . 209

CXLVII. The Knight's Tomb . . Sam. T. Coleridge . 211

CXLVI 1 1. Youth and Age .... Sam. T. Coleridge . 211

CXLIX. Glycine's Song .... Sam. T.Coleridge. 213

CL. The Holly Tree .... Robert Southey . . 215



xii CONTENTS.

PAGE

CLI. Hester Charles Lamb . . 217

CLI I. The Old familiar Faces . . Charles Lamb . . 218

CLIII. Ye Mariners of England . . Thomas Campbell . 220

CLIV. Hohenlinden Thomas Campbell . 222

CLV. Song Thomas Campbell . 223

CLVI. Margaret and Dora . . . Thomas Campbell . 225

CLVII. Plaint Ebenezer Elliott . 226

CLVI II. The Friar's Song .... Thomas L. Peacock 228

. CLIX. The War- Song of Dinas

Vawr Thomas L. Peacock -229

CLX. Beyond the sea,beyond the sea Thomas L. Peacock 231

CLXI. Lady Clarinda's Song . . Thomas L. Peacock 231

CLXII. Love and Age Thomas L. Peacock 233

CLXI 1 1. She walks in Beauty, like

the Night Lord Byron . . . 236

CLX IV. Bright be the place of thy

Soul Lord Byron . . . 237

CLXV. When we two Parted . . . Lord Byron ... 238

CLXVI. Stanzas for Music .... Lord Byron ... 239

CLXVII. Oh ! snatched away in

Beauty's bloom .... Lord Byron . . . 240

CLXVI 1 1. Song Charles Wolfe . . 242

CLXIX. The Burial of Sir John

Moore Charles Wolfe . . 243

CLXX. Stanzas. April, 1814 . . Percy B. Shelley . 246

CLXXI. Stanzas. Written in De-
jection, near Naples . . Percy B. Shelley . 247

CLXXI I. Song Percy B.Shelley . 249

CLXXIII. To Percy B. Shelley . 251



CONTENTS. xiii

PACK

CLXXIV. Lines Percy B.Shelley . 252

CLXXV. National Anthem . . . Percy B. Shelley . 253

CLXXVI. The Treasures of the Deep Felicia Hemans . 256

CLXXVII. Robin Hood John Keats ... 258

CLXXVIII. In a drear-nighted De-
cember John. Keats . . . 260

CLXXIX. Song Hartley Coleridge . 262

CLXXX. The Death-Bed .... Thomas Hood . . 263

CLXXXI. Fair Ines Thomas Hood . . 264

CLXXXII. Time's Song Winthrof M. Praed 267

CLXXXI 1 1. Fuimus Winthrofi M. Praed 268

CLXXXIV. Wolfram's Dirge. . . . Thomas L. Beddoes 270

CLXXXV. Song Thomas L. Beddoes 271



INTRODUCTION.

who insist on the original meanings
-*- of words may perhaps find it difficult to
distinguish between an ode and a lyric, except
that the latter term specified the instrument which
should accompany the song. But the classes of
poem are in fact widely separated, and we feel,
if we do not accurately discriminate, the difference
between them. It would not be easy to better
Mr. Gosse's definition of an ode. 'We take,' he
says, ' as an ode any strain of enthusiastic and
exalted lyrical verse, directed to a fixed pur-
pose, and dealing progressively with one dignified
theme. A lyric, on the other hand, is a short
poem dealing with one thought, essentially melo-
dious in rhythm and structure, and, if a metaphor
may be taken from the sister art, a simple air,
without progression, variation, or accompaniment.
If we wish to make the essentials of a lyric
still clearer to ourselves, we shall find we are
compelled to do so by negatives. It must not be
in blank, nor in heroic verse ; save indeed where
2



x vi INTR OD UC TION.

a refrain, and a subtle repetition of the same
words gives lyrical impression, as in Tennyson's
' Tears, idle tears,' and some of the songs in
the 'Idylls of the King.' It is not so severe in
form as the sonnet ; the poet's touch is lighter,
even when his subject is grave ; a dirge like
' Lycidas * cannot be accounted such, nor a sus-
tained and lofty poem as ' I have led her home '
in 'Maud.'

Some of our greatest poets have left no true
lyrics, or none into which they have put their
best work. Pope's only examples are a burlesque,
an imitation of Horace written when he was a
mere child, and a paraphrase, also from the Latin ;
Gray affords us none ; no adequately characteristic
specimen can be culled from Spenser, or more
than one or two from Milton, though the former
lived so near in time to Shakspere and Ben Jon-
son, lyrists if any were, and the latter has been
fitly termed ' inventor of harmonies,' so keen was
his sense of song.

The present collection, therefore, is in no de-
gree representative of the poets of England in their
poetic rank. He who is much here quoted is not
necessarily among the greatest, he who has scant
or no place may be a far more exalted artist than
some who are included, but he has worked less



INTR OD UC TION. xvii

in the special branch of art which now concerns
us : a statue of Pheidias could find no room, and
if it could would be inappropriate, in a cabinet of
gems. Form is always as important in the true
lyric, it is sometimes more important than the
thought, and just because the verse should be so
flawless, it now and then happens that a false note
struck in such a poem mars the whole, while it
would pass unnoticed in a more sustained work.
Thus, no one thinking of ' Lycidas * is in any
degree distressed at the line

And oh ye dolphins waft the hapless youth,

which a modern poet, master of melody, has called
' the only bad line which Milton ever wrote ; '

while

Then the might of England flushed
To anticipate the scene,

is like a fly in ointment, spoiling the whole of
Campbell's ' Battle of the Baltic,' though indeed
they are not the only blemishes even in that one
poem.

The aim is to present in one volume the per-
fection of English lyrics, by whomsoever written
between the dates selected. Wyatt heads the list,
not because there were not a few excellent lyrists
earlier than he, but because no earlier poems than



xviii INTRODUCTION.

his can be written in modern spelling without
sacrifice of rhythm and rime, and it is desired that
the book should be ' in a tongue understanded of
the people.' No living authors are included, and
none who have died within the second half of this
century. We cannot yet judge them fairly ; the
living exercise too great a spell over us by their
presence ; for those but recently gone our tears,
as St. Leo said of the Magdalen, have woven a
veil which prevents our discriminating what they
are who are called up before us.

Odes, properly so called, are excluded ; as are
all narrative, didactic, and ballad poems. Nor are
true lyrics included which will not stand alone.
Thus a beautiful song in ' The Lady of the Lake '
finds no place because a line in it is unintelligible
apart from the narrative in which it is imbedded.
Nor, for the same reason, are extracts given from
longer poems.

It is too much to hope that any selection will
satisfy all readers, some of whom will no doubt
miss favourites, which even if known by heart can-
not be read too often :

As for some dear familiar strain^
Untired we ask and ask again ;
Ever in its melodious store
Finding a sj>ell unheard before :



INTRODUCTION. xix

But the reason for the exclusion of most of these
will probably be found in the canons of lyric
already laid down.

The Editor's best thanks are due to Mr. E. W.
Gosse, Mr. Austin Dobson, and Mr. W. J. Linton,
for valuable aid and suggestions.



ENGLISH LYRICS.

SIR THOMAS WYATT,
I. 15031542.

THE LOVER PRAISETH THE BEAUTY OF
HIS LADY'S HAND.

O GOODLY hand !
Wherein doth stand
My heart distract in pain ;
Dear hand, alas !
In little space

My life thou dost restrain.

O fingers slight !
Departed right,

So long, so small, so round ;
Goodly begone,
And yet a bone

Most cruel in my wound.

With lilies white
And roses bright

Doth strain thy colour fair ;



II.



ENGLISH LYRICS.

Nature did lend
Each finger's end

A pearl for to repair.

Consent at last,
Since that thou hast

My heart in thy demain,
For service true
On me to rue,

And reach me love again.

And if not so,
There with more woe

Enforce thyself to strain
This simple heart,
That suffered smart,

And rid it out of pain.



THE LOVER BESEECHETH HIS MISTRESS

NOT TO FORGET HIS STEADFAST

FAITH AND TRUE INTENT.

FORGET not yet the tried intent
Of such a truth as I have meant ;
My great travail so gladly spent,
Forget not yet !



S/X THOMAS IVY ATT.

Forget not yet when first began
The weary life ye know, since whan
The suit, the service none tell can ;
Forget not yet !

Forget not yet the great assays,
The cruel wrong, the scornful ways,
The painful patience in delays-
Forget not yet !

Forget not ! Oh f forget not this,
How long ago hath been, and is
The mind that never meant amiss.
Forget not yet !

Forget not then thine own approved,
The which so long hath thee so loved,
Whose steadfast faith yet never moved :
Forget not this !



ENGLISH LYRICS.



HENRY HOWARD, EARL OF

SURREY,
III. 15171547.

COMPLAINT OF THE ABSENCE OF HER
LOVER BEING UPON THE SEA.

O HAPPY dames, that may embrace
The fruit of your delight,
Help to bewail the woeful case,

And eke the heavy plight
Of me, that wonted to rejoice
The fortune of my pleasant choice :
Good ladies, help to fill my mourning voice.

In ship, freight with rememberance

Of thoughts, and pleasures past,
He sails that hath in governance

My life, while it will last :
With scalding sighs, for lack of gale,
Furthering his hope, that is his sail
Toward me, the swete port of his avail.

Alas ! how oft in dreams I see

Those eyes, that were my food,



HENRY HOWARD, EARL OF SURREY.

Which sometime so delighted me,

That yet they do me good.
Wherewith I wake with his return,
Whose absent flame did make me burn.
But when I find the lack, Lord ! how I mourn.

When other lovers in arms across,

Rejoice their chief delight ;
Drowned in tears to mourn my loss,

I stand the bitter night,
In my window where I may see,
Before the winds how the clouds flee.
Lo ! what mariner love hath made me.

And in green waves when the salt flood

Doth rise, by rage of wind ;
A thousand fancies in that mood

Assail my restless mind.
Alas ! now drencheth my sweet foe,
That with the spoil of my heart did go,
And left me ; but, alas ! why did he so ?

And when the seas wax calm again,

To chase from me annoy,
My doubtful hope doth cause me plain :

So dread cuts off my joy.
Thus is my wealth mingled with woe,
And of each thought a doubt doth grow,
Now he comes, will he come ? alas ! no, no.



ENGLISH LYRICS.



RICHARD EDWARDS,
IV. 15231566.

AMANTIUM IR^E AMORIS REDINTE-
GRATIO EST.

T N going to my naked bed as one that would have slept,
-L I heard a wife sing to her child, that long before had

wept:
She sighed sore and sang full sweet, to bring the babe to

rest,
That would not cease but cried still, in sucking at her

breast.
She was full weary of her watch, and grieved with her

child,

She rocked it and rated it, till that on her it smiled :
Then did she say now have I found this proverb true to

prove,
The falling out of faithful friends, renewing is of love.

Then took I paper pen and ink, this proverb for to write,
In register for to remain, of such a worthy wight :
As she proceeded thus in song unto her little brat,
Much matter uttered she of weight, in place whereas she

sat.



RICHARD EDWARDS. 7

And proved plain, there was no beast, nor creature bearing

life,
Could well be known to live in love, without discord and

strife :

Then kissed she her little babe, and sware by God above,
The falling out of faithful friends, renewing is of love.

She said that neither king nor prince, nor lord could live

aright,
Until their puissance they did prove their manhood and

their might.
When manhood shall be matched so, that fear can take no

place,

Then weary works make warriors each other to embrace,
And left their force that failed them, which did consume

the rout,

That might before have lived their time, and nature out :
Then did she sing as one that thought no man could her

reprove,
The falling out of faithful friends, renewing is of love.

She said she saw no fish nor fowl, nor beast within her

haunt,

That met a stranger in their kind, but could give it a taunt :
Since flesh might not endure, but rest must wrath succeed,
And force the fight to fall to play, in pasture where they

feed,



8 ENGLISH LYRICS.

So noble nature can well end the work she hath begun,
And bridle well that will not cease, her tragedy in some :
Thus in song she oft rehearsed, as did her well behove,
The falling out of faithful friends, renewing is of love.

I marvel much pardy quoth she, for to behold the rout,
To see man, woman, boy, beast, to toss the world about :
Some kneel, some crouch, some beck, some cheek, and

some can smoothly smile,
And some embrace others in arm, and there think many

awile.
Some stand aloof at cap and knee, some humble and some

stout,

Yet are they never friends in deed, until they once fall out :
Thus ended she her song, and said before she did remove,
The falling out of faithful friends, renewing is of love.



WILLIAM HUNNIS.



WILLIAM HUNNIS
V. died 1568.

THE LOVER CURSETH THE TIME WHEN
FIRST HE FELL IN LOVE.

WHEN first mine eyes did view and mark
Thy beauty fair for to behold,
And when mine ears 'gan first to hark

The pleasant words that thou me told :
I would as then I had been free
From ears to hear and eyes to see.

And when my hands did handle oft,
That might thee keep in memory,

And when my feet had gone so soft
To find and have thy company,

I would each hand a foot had been,

And eke each foot a hand so seen.

And when in mind I did consent

To follow thus my fancy's will,
And when my heart did first relent

To taste such bait myself to spill,
I would my heart had been as thine,
Or else thy heart as soft as mine.



ENGLISH LYRICS.

Then should not I such cause have found
To wish this monstrous sight to see,

Nor thou, alas ! that madest the wound,
Should not deny me remedy :

Then should one will in both remain,

To ground one heart which now is twain,



GEORGE GASCOIGNE.



GEORGE GASCOIGNE,
VI. 1535? 1577-

THE LULLABY OF A LOVER.

SING lullaby, as women do,
Wherewith they bring their babes to rest ;
And lullaby can I sing too,

As womanly as can the best.
With lullaby they still the child ;
And, if I be not much beguiled,
Full many a wanton babe have I,
Which must be stilled with lullaby.

First lullaby my youthful years,

It is now time to go to bed :
For crooked age and hoary hairs

Have won the haven within my head.
With lullaby then youth be still ;
With lullaby content thy will ;
Since courage quails and comes behind,
Go sleep and so beguile thy mind !
3



ENGLISH LYRICS.

Next, lullaby my gazing eyes,
Which wonted were to glance apace ;

For every glass may now suffice
To show the furrows in my face.

With lullaby then wink awhile ;

With lullaby your looks beguile ;

Let no fair face, nor beauty bright,

Entice you eft with vain delight.

And lullaby my wanton will ;

Let reason's rule now rein thy thought ;
Since all too late I find by skill

How dear I have thy fancies bought ;
With lullaby now take thine ease,
With lullaby thy doubts appease ;
For trust to this, if thou be still,
My body shall obey thy will.

Eke lullaby my loving boy,

My little robin take thy rest ;
Since age is cold and nothing coy,

Keep close thy coin, for so is best.
With lullaby be thou content ;
With lullaby thy lusts relent.
Let others pay which have more pence ;
Thou art too poor for such expense.



GEORGE GASCOIGNE. 13

Thus lullaby my youth, mine eyes,
My will, my ware, and all that was :

I can no more delays devise ;
But welcome pain, let pleasure pass.

With lullaby now take your leave,

With lullaby your dreams deceive,

And when you rise with waking eye,

Remember then this lullaby.



I4 ENGLISH LYRICS.



NICHOLAS BRETON,
VII. 1542-1626?

,A PASTORAL OF PHILLIS AND CORYDON.

ON a hill there grows a flower,
Fair befall the dainty sweet ;
By that flower there is a bower,
Where the heavenly Muses meet.

In that bower there is a chair,

Fringed all about with gold ;
Where doth sit the fairest fair

That ever eye did yet behold.

It is Phillis fair and bright,

She that is the shepherd's joy ;
She that Venus did despite,

And did blind her little boy.

This is she, the wise, the rich,

That the world desires to see ;
This is ipsa qua; the which,

There is none but only she.



NICHOLAS BRETON. 15

Who would not this face admire ?

Who would not .this saint adore ?
Who would not this sight desire,

Though he thought to see no more ?

Oh fair eyes, yet let me see,

One good look, and I am gone ;
Look on me, for I am he,

Thy poor silly Corydon.

Thou that art the shepherd's queen,

Look upon thy silly swain ;
By thy comfort have been seen

Dead men brought to life again.



VIII.
CORYDON'S SUPPLICATION TO PHILLIS.

SWEET Phillis, if a silly swain,


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Online LibraryGeorge H. (George Herman) EllwangerEnglish lyrics → online text (page 1 of 9)