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George Henry Tinkham.

History of Stanislaus County California : with biographical sketches of the leading men and women of the county who have been identified with its growth and development from the early days to the pres online

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Online LibraryGeorge Henry TinkhamHistory of Stanislaus County California : with biographical sketches of the leading men and women of the county who have been identified with its growth and development from the early days to the pres → online text (page 101 of 177)
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union have been born three children, one daughter, Shirley Jane, and two sons, Robert
Eugene and Raymond Henry. Both Mr. and Mrs. Rice are prominent in social and
civic affairs and give their support to all uplift measures for their city.

GEORGE MILLS LOCK. — Among the dairy farmers of pronounced success in
Stanislaus County, none should be more satisfied than George Mills Lock, a Cali-
fornian by adoption, but an enthusiastic, loyal American and "a jolly good fellow,"
who lives and operates on his trim ranch on the old Oakdale highway, six and a
half miles northeast of Modesto, as well as engaged as a realtor in that city. He
was born in Devonshire, England, on November 6, 1878, and grew up on a farm
where his parents lived and died. His father was George Mills Lock, and he had
married Miss Martha Cavill. They were worthy country folk, and provided just
the comfortable home and environment needed to develop what was best in George, Jr.

Being athletic, fond of sport, and withal fearless, he early took up riding in
the hunting stables of Col. Garrett, a retired British gentleman of wealth and distinc-
tion, and broke young horses to the sadlde, at the same time that he taught them how
to jump fences and other barriers, and prepared them for the hunt, polo and other
sporting evolutions. He had reached the eighth grade in the public schools, • and
had been carefully reared in the Church of England; and when only seventeen, he
volunteered in the Glamorganshire Yeomanry, a cavalry regiment of rough riders
for the Boer War. He consequently shipped for South Africa, and in March, 1900,
disembarked at Cape Town, after which he participated in the various engagements
in the Orange River Colony campaign. He fought at Spion Kopf, and endured his
share of each hard day's work in the campaign in the Orange Free State ; and he also
fought to the finish in the Transvaal in 1901, and was honorably discharged at
Harrismith, and there mustered out of the service.

The eventful moments of this great struggle in the progress of the world led
Mr. Lock to ponder deeply the real significance of life and to resolve that, when
the war should be at an end, he would come out to California where he might
enjoy the greatest field for his abilities; a resolution that was quickened, no doubt,
by the fact that he had an uncle, Henry Cavill, a Stanislaus County pioneer — now
eighty-eight years old — living at 1119 Eighteenth Street, Modesto. At the end of
a six weeks' visit with relatives in England, therefore, Mr. Lock bought a through
ticket for Riverbank, Cal., and set sail from Southampton for his uncle's home.

Mr. Lock arrived at Riverbank in November, 1902, and at once began to
work out on farms. In 1915 he bought his present place of fifty-three acres, although
for years he had leased the same, a tract for a long time a grain field, where he
became one of the most extensive and successful grain farmers of Stanislaus County,
raising barley and wheat. On purchasing the property, however, he leveled and
checked it, and sowed it to alfalfa; he erected the necessary buildings, roomy and
substantial, and there he is now operating on a large scale as a dairy farmer. How
active Mr. Lock has been in his chosen field may be judged from the fact that he
has cultivated as much as 1,800 acres at one time, and farmed this whole stretch of
country from the Old Oakdale Road to Riverbank station, and has harvested barley,
in fact, where Riverbank now stands. He has a cow-barn 64x75 feet in size, with
a concrete foundation capable of holding 130 tons of hay, and a horse-barn 28x50
feet in size, which holds forty tons of hay, and also a substantial poultry house and
poultry yards; a blacksmith shop; a tank house, a milk house, and a garage, as well
as a thoroughly up-to-date bungalow of seven living rooms. His tank house is con-
nected with a well sixty-one feet deep, from which an aeromotor windmill furnishes
plenty of water for stock and domestic purposes. He also keeps in reserve a gas
engine of two and one-fourth horsepower. Around the residence are fine lawns, a
young family orchard, and an adequate vegetable garden. He keeps twenty graded
Holstein cows, and has an excellent registered sire, a full-blooded Holstein bull.




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Online LibraryGeorge Henry TinkhamHistory of Stanislaus County California : with biographical sketches of the leading men and women of the county who have been identified with its growth and development from the early days to the pres → online text (page 101 of 177)