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George Henry Tinkham.

History of Stanislaus County California : with biographical sketches of the leading men and women of the county who have been identified with its growth and development from the early days to the pres online

. (page 43 of 177)
Online LibraryGeorge Henry TinkhamHistory of Stanislaus County California : with biographical sketches of the leading men and women of the county who have been identified with its growth and development from the early days to the pres → online text (page 43 of 177)
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years old, Miller came to Stanislaus County and started in as a farm hand on the
Clark Ranch near Paradise Ferry, soon breaking wild horses. Later he was able to
start out for himself on a ranch in the Westport district, and there he owned 640
acres of land. In 1907 he retired to Modesto. He and his good wife became the
parents of two children. Eva Lillian is now the wife of D. D. Christman of Modesto,
while Walter C, who married Miss Ila May of this town, also resides here.

Mr. McPherson was one of the first directors in the Turlock Irrigation Dis-
trict, and served in that capacity for twenty years. He was a hard, but rational
worker, and owned three ranches when he died on January 31, 1915. Surviving him
is a brother, Lycurgus McPherson, of Sonoma County, Cal. Curiously enough, although
he contributed greatly to the success of irrigation, he was among the opponents of
the enterprise when it was first proposed. Among various positions of responsibility
held by him in his active life was that of a director in the Farmers & Merchants
Bank of Modesto. He passed away at the Modesto Sanitarium, and the funeral was
held at the family residence. Esteemed for her accomplishments as well as for her
virtues, Mrs. McPherson has long occupied an enviable position of influence in
Modesto. She belongs to the Rebekahs and the Woman's Relief Corps; and she has
been very active in Red Cross work.

In the passing of Mrs. McPherson's mother, Mrs. Mary Vivian, death called
another old and very respected resident of Modesto and pioneer of Stanislaus County.



296 HISTORY OF STANISLAUS COUNTY

She had lived in this community continuously since 1854, having come from England
to the United States when only fourteen years of age. After coming to America in
1842, she settled with her brother at Hazel Green in Grant County, Wis., and five
years later married Mr. Vivian, who was mining in that section. In February, 1851,
they left for California, sailing around the Horn, and arrived in this State the follow-
ing April. In 1855 they bought 4,000 acres in the Westport section, south of
Modesto, and there they were very successful in stock raising, and Mr. Vivian died
in his sixtieth year. In 1901 the family moved to Modesto, and when Mrs. Vivian
died she was survived by ten children — two sons and eight daughters — thirty-five grand-
children and ten great-grandchildren. Had Mrs. Vivian lived a- week or two longer,
she would have attained to her eighty-second year.

MRS. FLORENCE LANDER PORTER.— A highly-esteemed early resident of
Turlock who has not only seen the town grow to a city, but with her lamented hus-
band, also one of the long-honored citizens here, helped in the building, is Mrs. Flor-
ence Lander Porter, who first came to California in the late '60s. She was born near
Cassville, Grant County, Wis., on March 23, 1841, the daughter of Isaac Chrisman
Lander, a native of Kentucky, who was reared there, and who later removed to
Grant County, Wis., where he followed the trade of wheelwright. In those early
days he also spent several seasons in the pineries of Wisconsin, assisting in logging and
lumbering. Her mother, before her marriage, was Thurza Ann Ray, a native of
Kentucky who came, in her girlhood, with her father, Capt. Richard Ray, to Galena,
111., the town so historic through its association with General Grant, and later removed
to Cassville, Grant County, Wis. He served in the Black Hawk Indian War as
captain of a company. Mrs. Porter was the fourth eldest child, and was reared and
educated in Wisconsin, attending the public schools in Grant County, and the Mazo-
inanie schools in Dane County.

After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Lander moved on to a farm at Cassville, but
in 1850, Mr. Lander joined the rushing tide across the plains in ox-teams to the Pacific
Coast, first going to Oregon, where Mr. Lander followed the industry of catching
salmon. In 1856, Mr. Lander returned East to his family on the Wisconsin farm,
and then they moved to another farm at Mazomanie, near Madison, where they con-
tinued until 1872, when he migrated with his wife and son to California and located
at Turlock. He bought a farm of eighty acres in the western part of the district,
and Lander Avenue, named for him, is the east line of what was once his ranch.
There he resided until his death, at the age of eighty-one, in 1880. Sometime after
his death, his children sold the eighty acres, and it was afterwards laid out into lots,
and is now entirely built up. Ten of their children grew to maturity. Eliza, Mrs.
McCapes, died in Fresno; Minerva, Mrs. Ransom, died in Albert Lea, Minn.; Henry
died in Sonoma County, Calif., he had come to California in 1861 ; Florence L. is the
subject of this review. Richard, who came here in January, 1870, was an early settler
of Turlock. He served in Company D, Thirty-third Wisconsin Regulars in the Civil
War, and died in Healdsburg. Isaac also had the honor of serving in the Civil War
as a soldier in the Second Wisconsin Regiment, and died in Iowa. Lavina, Mrs.
Harvey, passed away in North Dakota; Clarke died in Turlock; Alice, Mrs. Mann,
died in Minnesota, while Charles still resides in Oakland.

Stephen V. Porter was born in Mammacating, Sullivan County, N. Y., the son
of John Porter, who brought the family to Dane County, Wis., where he was a suc-
cessful dairy farmer. He had received a good training in the local schools in Wisconsin,
and when he became a farmer, he operated in the most intelligent manner and enjoyed
proportionate success.

Mr. and Mrs. Porter were married on February 28, 1867, and the following year
they came out to California, by way of Panama, on the old Constitution from New
York to Aspinwall, and then journeying to San Francisco on the Henry Chancery,
came to Turlock, where they leased 600 acres of John Mitchell's farm and went in
•for the raising of grain. They went through many hardships, when for many sea-
sons there was a total loss of crops. Before the railroad was built to Turlock. the
Turlock post office was in Mr. and Mrs. Porter's farm house, one mile north of what




y?j^u*i



HISTORY OF STANISLAUS COUNTY . 309

here when she was nineteen. Mr. and Mrs. Church had six children, five daughters
and a son, and Mrs. Mullin was the fourth in order of birth. The others were:



Online LibraryGeorge Henry TinkhamHistory of Stanislaus County California : with biographical sketches of the leading men and women of the county who have been identified with its growth and development from the early days to the pres → online text (page 43 of 177)