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George Henry Tinkham.

History of Stanislaus County California : with biographical sketches of the leading men and women of the county who have been identified with its growth and development from the early days to the pres online

. (page 73 of 177)
Online LibraryGeorge Henry TinkhamHistory of Stanislaus County California : with biographical sketches of the leading men and women of the county who have been identified with its growth and development from the early days to the pres → online text (page 73 of 177)
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Holt of Oakland ; and Ora H. is at home. ' He entered the United States service in
October, 1917, and trained at Camp Lewis with the Ninety-first Division and while
fighting for the defense and honor of his country in France, was wounded. As a
member of Company B of the Three Hundred and Sixty-fourth Infantry, he was dis-
charged in April, 1919, receiving the credential which will attest, for all time, that he
did his duty.

JACOB CURTIS MOORE. — A progressive, experienced rancher who easily
ranks among the successful agriculturists of Stanislaus County, is Jacob Curtis Moore,
who lives not far from Keyes and was born near Indianapolis, Ind., on March 13,
1860. His father was Jacob N. Moore, of Darke County, Ohio, who removed to
Indiana and there became a pioneer in Boone County. He married Leali M. Ribber,
of Pennsylvania, whose parents came from Germany, settled for a while in the Key-
stone State, and then migrated on to Indiana.

Jacob was five years old when his parents moved to Marshall County, Iowa,
where he attended the district school until he was thirteen. He spent his boyhood
and youth upon his father's farm, working from sunrise until sunset, and then con-
tinuing after dark with the usual chores; but after his sixteenth year he managed,
during the winter season, to get two short terms of two months each of additional
schooling. At twenty-two years of age, he left the parental roof and started out into
the world on his own account, and for a number of seasons he worked as one of a crew
on a threshing machine. When the threshing season was over, he took up the carpenter
trade, continuing for some years to do carpentering in various sections of Iowa.

In 1906 he reached Los Angeles, and after stopping for six months there, he
removed to the upper Sacramento Valley. His experience with unsatisfactory condi-
tions there, however, led him to abandon the intention of settling there; and in 1908
lie came down to Modesto, and for five years, as a carpenter, both expert and original,






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HISTORY OF STANISLAUS COUNTY 619

lie helped to build that rapidly growing town. Selling his property there in 1914,
he purchased twenty acres one and one-fourth miles southwest of Keyes, on the Service
Road, and here he is now engaged successfully in diversified farming. He belongs to
the Educational Cooperative Union of America, the Keyes local.

In 1886, Mr. Moore was married to Miss Ella Simpkins, a native of Ohio, and
the daughter of Nathan and Anna (Welker) Simpkins, both of whom also first saw
the light in the Buckeye State. Her father was a master carpenter, and he worked at
his trade during his entire lifetime. Naturally gifted intellectually, Mrs. Moore is a
graduate of the State Normal School of Iowa, and she taught school in Marshall
County of that state for three terms before her marriage. Three children have blessed
the union. Vera is the wife of John Haine, a rancher at Keyes, and they have three
children. Harry C. Moore, also a rancher at Keyes, has a record for honorable,
efficient service as a soldier in the U. S. Army. Wilbur, who married Miss Edna
Ellis, and is ranching at Keyes, served in the army as a noncommissioned officer. Mr.
Moore is a Mason, and both he and his good wife are members of the First Baptist
Church at Modesto, where their straightforward, unpretentious walk in life has
brought them the highest esteem of all who know them.

ULYSSES GRANT STRADER.— The citizens of Stanislaus County, appre-
ciating the value to posterity of those who early dwelt here and lived their lives well,
will always honor the memory of Ulysses Grant Strader, who at one time farmed on
the Maze & Wren Tract south of Modesto and had the honor of bringing into
Stanislaus County the first herd of imported "Dutch Belt" dairy cattle. He was
born at Newton, N. J., on October 12, 1864, one of a family tracing its ancestry
back to German blood too good to remain in the Fatherland, in the stormy days of
1848, and to endure there what was exacted of the patriot. Three Strader brothers
then came to America; the eldest, from whom Ulysses Grant Strader descended, set-
tled in New Jersey; the next in the order of birth located in Philadelphia; while the
_voungest pitched his tent in the Mississippi Valley and later on controlled a fleet of
river barges which made him wealthy. The family in New Jersey were known as
well-to-do farmers, of high integrity and good moral standing; and this precious legacy
was fully inherited by the deceased. The father of our subject was John Strader, who
was born in New Jersey, and married Miss Margaret Space, also of that state.

Ulysses attended for a time the country school of the district, and then learned
the carpenter trade — so thoroughly that he was emploved in the railroad shops. At
Jersey City, on July 16, 1890, Mr. Strader married Miss Jennie Gillanders, who was
born on October 11, 1868, the daughter of James and Ann Jane (Moore) Gillanders,
both natives of the County Monaghan, Northern Ireland. Her father was a well-to-
do business man and farmer, and served as district county tax collector for many years,
the daughter helping him when she grew old enough to make out the reports. Her
mother died when she was four years old, and she was reared by her father. She was
able to attend the Model School, where she took up her work later as nursery
governess, and later on she mastered telegraphy. Then, at the a



Online LibraryGeorge Henry TinkhamHistory of Stanislaus County California : with biographical sketches of the leading men and women of the county who have been identified with its growth and development from the early days to the pres → online text (page 73 of 177)