George J. (George Jones) Varney.

The young people's history of Maine; from its earliest discovery to the final settlement of its boundaries in 1842 online

. (page 1 of 20)
Online LibraryGeorge J. (George Jones) VarneyThe young people's history of Maine; from its earliest discovery to the final settlement of its boundaries in 1842 → online text (page 1 of 20)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


.^*



'd>. * . ., ,,



\.



.<>>






"^.^X






N^^



.Oc



,0 o^.






-/• ,C'



\^^^-



C^-



cJ>.







""mwMmmms^''"' ' -^'f



THE



YOUNG PEOPLE'S



HISTORY OF MAINE;



FROM ITS EARLIEST DISCOVERY TO THE FINAL
SETTLEMENT OF ITS BOUNDARIES IN 1843.



By GEO. J. VARNEY,

Member of Maine Historical Society.



A-DA-FTED FOR TJSE IIS" SCHOOLS,
ILLUSTRATED.



^■^eii^5ir^?:^i^s=^tiiT~-




PORTLAND, ME. : ^
DRESSER, MoLELLAN & CO.,

1873.,.,,



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1873, by

GEORGE J. VARNEY,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress at "Washington,



Daily Press Printing House, Portland, Me.,
Wm. M. Marks, Manager.



To THE Young People op Maine, whose acts will
form an important part in the future history of our
country, this record of our beginnings is hopefully dedi-
cated — with the wish that its lessons and examples may
stimulate their j^atriotism, and influence them to emu-
late its noble deeds and copy its worthiest characters.



PREFACE



In this little volume I have endeavored to present
faithfully and clearly the beginnings of our State, what
manner of life the early residents led, and what notable
events have marked the progress of its affairs.

Though the book is devoted wholly to setting forth
the deeds of the people of Maine, it has not been my
purpose to foster state above national pride, neither to
prolong any bitterness toward those whom our fore-
fathers met in mortal strife ; but, by exhibiting the ex-
cellent record of the Pine Tree State, to furnish grounds
of justification for that regard which all would like to
entertain toward their native region, or the home of their
adoption.

I have endeavored so to treat the subject as to make
the lessons of our brief history useful to the youngest
readers, without descending to such trivial details or
trifling manner as would prove unj^leasant to those more
mature. The proj^er limits of the volume would not
admit so much fulness of incident as might be desired
by some; and in making a selection I have preferred
such as best illustrate their time and are also closely
connected with the movement of affairs; and in this
respect I think my work will be sustained by those accu-
rately conversant with our historical records. As the
nature of this history does not require it, I have avoided
burdening its pages with references to authorities. In



PEEFACE. VII

regard to dates, new style exclusively has been used, as
avoiding all confusion.

For those desiring a more complete record of early
times, I am happy to recommend the "Beginnings of
New England," by R. K. Sewell, Esq., of Wiscasset, to-
gether with those learned and exhaustive volumes of
the "Documentary History of Maine," by Rev. Leonard
Woods, D. D., L. L. D.

My thanks are due for courtesies and valuable aid, to
Reverend Professor A. S. Packard, D. D., the accom-
plished librarian of the Maine Historical Society, as well
as to its late president, the lamented Judge Bourne ; also,
to Hon. J. W. North, the historian and biographer of
Augusta, and to J. G. Elder, Esq., of the Lewiston public
library.

It would be unjust to close without acknowledging
that this volume has proceeded from a suggestion of the
desirableness of such a work, by Hon. Nelson Dingley,
Jr. — a gentleman widely known in connection with the
educational interests of this State.

At the suggestion of friends long familiar with schools
I have added a few questions at the close of each chap-
ter, giving the work a special adaptation for use as a
text book. Where it is not deemed best to make the
history a subject of formal recitation, it may be used for
reading lessons — when the questions will be found useful
in fixing the essential points of the narrative upon the
mind of the pupil.

With these remarks I leave the book in the hands of
a generous public, hoping that my efforts will meet
with a kind approval.

Brunswick, Me., Nov. 15th, 1873.



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER I.
THE COAST EXPLORED.
Cabot's Discovery. Visits of the Northmen, French, Spanish and
English. Gosnold on the coast of Maine. Pring's voyage.
Fox Islands. Pring trades with the natives. Weymouth dis-
covers Monhegan. Crystal Hills. The garden at Pentecost
Harbor. Sagadahoc or Kennebec. Indian men, women and
children. Drinking tobacco. Catching savages. The em-
bassy. A French colony. To Cape Cod and back. Port
Royal founded.

CHAPTEE 11.
THE FIRST COLONY OF NEW ENGLAND.
The North and South Virginia Company. The Popham colony.
Monhegan. Skidwarroes. The first sermon. Escape of
Skidwarroes. The vessels at Sagadahoc. Description of
Sabino. The colonists disembark. Building a village.
The first English vessel. Explorations. The Bashaba.
Indians at the x>lantation. Indian opinion of the Eng-
lishman's religion. The trick with the cannon. The store-
house blown up. Death of Popham. Departure of the
colonists.

CHAPTER in.
EARLY EVENTS ON THE COAST OF MAINE.
The Jesuit colony at Mt. Desert. Argal destroys* it. Capt. John
Smith explores Maine. The Bashaba overthrown. Pestilence.
Gorges' colony at Saco. Rocrof t. Dermer. The French-
man's prophecy. Samoset and the Pilgrims. Samoset and
Capt. Levett.



CONTENTS. IX

CHAPTER lY.

COLONIES AND COLONISTS.
The New England Charter. Sir Ferdinando Gorges. Laconia.
The Pilgrims at New Plymouth. Earlier settlements. First
general government in New England. The Kennebec Patent.
Puritan trading houses. The Lygonia, or Plough Patent.
Muscongus grant, or "Waldo Patent. Pemaquid Patent.
Sheepscot, or the garden of the East. Massachusetts Bay
Colony. New Scotland ceded to the French. Sir William
Alexander's right acquired by La Tour. Plunder of English
trading houses and vessels in Acadie. The first Pirate.
D'Aulney at Biguyduce.

CHAPTEE Y.
POLITICS, PROPERTY, AND CIVIL AFFAIRS.

Maine divided into four provinces. New Somersetshire. Its gov-
ernment. Drunkenness. Oppressions by the king. The
Province of Maine. Rights of the proprietor and of the king.
Divisions and government of the province. Legal decisions.
Agricultural products. Manufactures and commerce. City
of Gorgeaua. The Plough Patent revived. ' Religious free-
dom. Death of Gorges.

CHAPTEE YI.
COUNTIES, CUSTOMS AND CHARACTERS.

Six governments in Maine. John Alden. Homicide on the Ken-
nebec. Thomas Purchas. Elasticity of the Massachusetts
Bay Charter. Gorges' government dissolved. John Bony-
thon. Western Maine becomes the County of Yorkshire.
Courts. The militia. Musketeers and pikemen. The boys'
training. The stocks, pillory, whipping-post, and ducking
stool. Other penalties. Religious oppression. Rev. John
Brock.

CHAPTEE YIL

WARS AND RUMORS OF WARS.

Fears of war with the Indians. The conquest of Acadia. Sir



X HISTORY OF MAINE.

Thomas Temple. Grant to the Duke of York. The king's
commissioners. County of Cornwall. New Scotland again
ceded to France. Governor Nichols' warning. The Conquest
of Maine. Purchase of Gorges' right. The County of
Cornwall becomes the County of Devonshire.

CHAPTEH VIII.

THE INDIANS OF MAINE.

The Abuakis. Anasagunticooks or Androscoggins. * Canibas.
Etcchemins. Tarratincs. Openangoes. The Bashaba. Oys-
ter shell mounds. Cannibals. Personal description of the na-
tives. Dress. Labors. Wigwams. Hunting. Canoes,
Bows and Arrows. Hooks, nets and weirs. Food and cook-
ing. Domestic utensils. Little Indians. Merrymakings.
Indian belles. AVeddings. Sports. Smoking. Diseases.
Pow-wows. Religion. Government. Councils. Lan-
guage.

CHAPTER IX.
THE FIRST INDIAN WAR COMMENCES.
The French fraternize with the Indians. They become Roman
Catholics. AVrongs of the Indians. They become hostile to
the English. Decrease in the numbers of the Indians. Pas-
saconaway. His prophecy. The petition of Rowles. Squan-
do's child drowned. Squando has revelations from the spirit
world. King Philip's war. Mo-ho-tiwormet's treaty. The
Androscoggins plunder the settlement of Thomas Purchas.
The slaughter of the Wakely family. The captive girl, John
Bonythou warned. Attack on Phillips' garrison at Saco. The
battle at Winter Harbor. Attack on Berwick. A noble girl.
A fast. Death of Lieut. Plaisted. The cannon shot at Ports-
mouth. Retreat of the savages. Losses. The treaty. Re-
turn of Elizabeth.

CHAPTER X.
FIRST INDIAN WAR CONTINUED.

Forebodings of war. Seizure and sale of Indians for slaves.
Abraham Shurte. Demands of the Indians. Death of King



C0>'TEXT5. S-

Philip. Simon, the Yankee- killer. Mr. Brackett's cow.
Attack on Casco Neck. The massacre at Georgetown. The
flight of a girl. The surprise of Arrowsic. Escape of Capt.
Davis. Destruction of the eastern settlements. The Attack
on Peaks' Island. Waldron's Ruse. The stone house on
Peaks' Island. Capture of Fryer's crew at Richmond's Island.
Pluck in Wells. Winter expedition against the Sokokis.
Mugg's treaty. Captives restored, 3Iugg's treaty a sham.
Waldron meets the Indians at ilare Point. Ruse of the Tar-
ratines. The 3Iohawks in Maine. The Indians aroused-
Their successes. The fight at Black Point. Death of Mugg.
Savages turn sailors. The fort at Pemaquid rebuilt. The
war closed. Terms of peace. Losses of the war.

CHAPTEE XI.
THE FIRST FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR.
Baron Castine. The Dutch at Castine. Andros' treaty with the
Indians. Attack on North Yarmouth. Death of Walter
Gendell. Jamestown at Pemaquid destroj'ed. Abdication of
James IL and overthrow of Andros. The people's govern-
ment revived. Indian revenge on Major Waldron. Capt.
Swaine. 3iIajor Church meets the Indians at Falmouth Neck.
Berwick destroyed. A flotUla of canoes. Indians camp in
Falmouth. The surprise on Munjoys HiiL The massacre on
Falmouth Neck.

CHAPTEE XII.
FIRST FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR CONTENTED.
Sir WiUiam Phipps. He builds a vessel at Woolwich. Raises the
treasure from a Spanish wreck. Takes Acadia from the
French. Unfortunate expedition against Canada. First pa-
lmer money. 3Iajor Church routs the Indians on the Andros-
coggin. The sagamores regain their wives and make peace.
Settlements destroyed. A vUlage of blockhouses. Wells at-
tacked by 3Ioxu5. Cape Neddock destroyed. King's exi)edi-
tion eastward. Fatal attack on York. (Generosity. Persist-
ent attacks on WeUs. The scout's trick. Bravery of Capt
Converse. The enemy retire. The torture of a prisoner.
Phipps appointed gOTemor. Builds a fort at Pemaquid.



XII HISTORY OF MAINE.

Church's expedition up the Penobscot. Fight with the Indians
on the Kennebec. Converse builds a fort at Saco. The In-
dians afraid of the Mohawks, and mal^e peace with the Eng-
lisli. Tlie treaty brol^en and Cocheco destroyed. Capt.
Chubb seizes the bearers of a flag of truce. Chubb surrenders
the fort at Pemaquid to Iberville. Major Church goes east-
ward again. IMajor March's skirmish with Indians at Dama-
riscotta. The war closed. Losses in the war.

CHAPTER XIII.
WITCHCRAFT, PIRACIES AND AN INDIAN TREATY.

The Witchcraft Delusion. Governor Phipps' wife accused. The
governor's eyes opened. Phipps succeeded by Bellamont as
governor. Pirates. Bellamont succeeded by Dudley. An-
other war expected. A new treat}'' with the Indians. Capt.
Simmo. The Two Brothers. Outrage on Castine, the
younger.

CIIAPTEE XIV.

QUEEN ANNE'S WAR.
Queen Amie's war commences. Simultaneous attacks on the set-
tlements. Ruse of the savages at Fort Loyal. The fort be-
sieged, Capt. Southwick attacks the Indian fleet. Troops of
Horse. Expedition to Ossipee and Pigwacket. Nineteen men
shot down. Plunniwell, the Indian killer. Major March at
Pigwacket. A bounty for Indian scalps. The Mohegans and
Pequots at Berwick. Col. Church goes eastward again.
Norridgewock burned. French privateers. Col. Hilton sur-
prises eighteen savages. Col. March goes against Acadia.
Exploit of the Indians in Winter Harbor. Acadia conquered
by Gen. Nicholson. Castine, the younger, guides Major Liv-
ingston through the wilderness. Col. Walton scouts along
the coast. The Indians intrude at a wedding. Another treaty.
Moxus' pretentions.

CHAPTER XY.

LOVEWELL'S WAR COISOIENCES.

Increase of settlements. Indian deeds. English missionaries to the



CONTENTS. XIII

Indians. False teaching of the Jesuits. An Indian speech.
Threats of the Indians against the settlers of Sagadahock.
Another expedition to Norridgewock. Settlements on Merry-
meeting Bay destroyed. Another attack on the fort at St.
George's. Brunswick burned. Night attack on the Indians
in Topsham. Deering's garrison surprised, and children cap-
tured. Mohawks on the Kennebec. The Micmacs and St.
Francis Indians at Arrowsic. Col. Westbrook burns the
Indian fort near Bangor. Another expedition to Norridge-
wock. The fight on St, George's River. Death of the brave
Captain Winslow.

CHAPTEK XYI.
THE DESTRUCTION OF NORRIDGEWOCK.
Final expedition against Norridgewock. Description of the village.
The engagement. Death of Mogg. Death of Ralle. Ac-
count of the missionary. An Indian's mistake. A writing.
The Jesuit's deceptions. Estimate of Ralle's character. In-
dian Old Point. Burning of the village by the Mohawk. Re-
sults of the expedition.

CHAPTER XYII.
LOVEWELL'S FIGHT.
Capt. Lovewell at Winnipesaukee. Lovewell starts for the Soko-
kis. The fort on Ossipee Pond. Pigwacket. Lovewell's
Pond. An Indian discovered. The packs left on the plain.
Capt. Lovewell wounded. An ambush, A close fight.
Lovewell's men retire to the pond. Chaplain Frye. Cham-
berlain and Paugus. Wyman and Paugus. Indians draw off.
English retreat. Kies escapes in a canoe. Frye and Far well
left. Jones reaches Biddeford. Arrival of the men at Ossi-
pee Pond. Fort foimd deserted. Col. Tyng visits Pigwacket
and buries the dead. The Pig^^ackets disappear. Capt.
Heath goes up the Penobscot. Indians want peace. Gov-
ernor Dummer's treaty.

CHAPTER XVni.
MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF THE ENGLISH SETTLERS.
The desolation of the wars in Maine. Easier times for the old



XIV HISTORY OF MAINE.

settlements. About immigrants. The king's woods. Masts
and knees for the royal navy. The king's surveyors and the
lumbermen. The king gives Col. Dunbar the province of
Sagadahock. The Scotch-Irish. Lutherans. Dunbar and
his friends throw Gov, Belcher out of office. Whitefield, the
evangelist, visits Maine. Anecdote of Whitefield and Ben
Franklin. The eccentric Mr. Moody. Puritan ministers.
The "Puritans" become "Congregationalists." Form of wor-
ship. Meeting houses. IIow the congregation kept warm.
Ministers. Boys and girls at meeting. The tythingman.
Singing. Sunday regulations. Schools. Social amusements.
IIow houses were built. Pork and pumpkins. Furniture.
Spinning wheels. Hand looms. Dress. Social customs.
Heir looms. Noble names.

CHAPTER XIX.

KING GEORGE'S WAR.

Louisburg, the Dunkirk and Gibraltar of America. An expedition
against it. Sir William Pepperell. Whitefield gives a motto
for the expedition. Col. Vaughn burns up the wine and
brandy. The English build batteries in the dark. Tyng cap-
tures a French vessel. A flag of truce. Dismay of the
French. A grand discharge of artillery. The city surren-
dered. Strong fortifications. Prizes. British claim all.
Rejoicings. The Tarratines. Mischief. The young warriors
pant for glory. Fort at St. George's assaulted. North Yar-
mouth surprised. The savages at Flying Point. Outrages at
other places. Bounties for Indian scalps.

CHAPTER XX.
KING GEORGE'S WAR CONTINUED.
Attack upon Gorham. Massacre of Bryants' family. Destruction
of Waldoboro. Dogs. French attempt to capture Louisburg.
The fleet scattered. Fever. Death of D'Anville. Suicide of
the vice-admiral. Western Maine swarms with Indians. An-
other French fleet. Attacks on Pemaquid and St. George's.
Peace of Aix-la-Chapelle. Indians talk peace. The St. Francis
Indians on a raid. Wiscasset attacked. A canoe upset. In-



CONTENTS. XV

dian depredations westward. A hunter shoots a chief.
French forces. The Indians make peace.

CHAPTER XXI.
THE SIXTH AND LAST INDIAN WAR.

French outrages. George Washington. French fortresses ex-
tended. English forts. French offer bounties for English
scalps. Braddock's defeat. Siege of Beau-sejour. Acadians
removed from Nova Scotia. Capt. Cargill kills friendly In-
dians. Manchester kills Poland, an Indian chief. Distresses.
Gen. Wolfe. Indian outrages cease. Fort Pownal. Death
of General Waldo. Successes. The swinging scalps at St.
Francis. Rejoicings. The French nation atones by Lafayette.

CHAPTER XXn.
THE DAWN OF THE REVOLUTION.

Peaceful times. Maine all border. The heroism of the settlers of
Maine. Two new counties. Gov. Pownal. New towns east
of the Penobscot. Drought and fire. British oppressions.
Taxation without representation. A new tax, Boston Mas-
sacre . First act of rebellion in Maine. The Boston "Tea
Party." Gen. Gage governor of Maine. First American
government.

CHAPTER XXm.

EARLY EVENTS OF THE REVOLUTION.

Captain Mowatt dismantles Fort Pownal. English missionaries.
Indians true to America. Battle of Lexington. Companies
set out from York and Falmouth. Col. Scammon's regiment.
The affair at King's dock in Bath. Captain Mowatt captured.
Battle of Bunker Hill. Capture of the Margrauetto. Cap-
. ture of the Diligent. Mowatt burns Falmouth. A war ves-
sel frightened off.

CHAPTER XXIV.
ARNOLD'S EXPEDITION AND THE WAR IN THE EAST.
Arnold's force ascends the Kennebec. Bombazec Rips. Dead



XVI HISTOEY OF MAINE.

River Carry. Col. Enos returns. The Chandiere. Flagstaff
Plantation. Mt. Bigelow. The accident. Bear broth. The
troops meet cattle. Defeat. Post offices. Maine a grand
military division. Independence declared. Colonel Eddy's
expedition. Colonel John Allan. His boys held as hostages.
British attack on Machias. Surrender of Burgoyne.

CHAPTER XXY.
EVENTS OF THE REVOLUTION ON SEA AND LAND.

Terrible fires. Hon. John Adams and Commodore Tucker. Three
British ships pursue the Boston. Tacker saves "that egg."
Capture of the Thorn, A French fleet. Maine made a Dis-
trict. British at Biguyduce, or Castine. Americans besiege
Castine. The embargo. The British on the Kennebec.
Capture of Gen. Wadsworth. His escape. More troops.
Capture of Cornwallis. More raids of the Canada Indians.
The treaty. Boundaries. Independence acknowledged.

CHAPTER XXVI.

AFTER THE REVOLUTION.

Customs and dress of the wealthy. Of farmers and mechanics.
Of their waves and daughters. Indian dress, new style. New
settlers. Big pine trees. First American flag. Exports regu-
lated. First newspaper. The Bingham Purchase. Germans,
Scotch and Irish. Commercial districts. Governor Hancock.
Bowdoin college.

CHAPTER XXYH.

THE MALTA WAR.

The Muscongus Patent. Major Gen. Knox. Lucy, his wife. The
old patents in new hands. Squatters. Murder of Chadwick.
Augusta invaded. The trial.

CHAPTER, xxyni.

THE WAR OF 1813.
Impressment of seamen. Little Belt. Commerce of Maine. Com.
Preble. Battle of the Enterprise and Boxer. Other suc-
cesses. Increase of manufacturers. The British at Eastport.



CONTENTS. XVII

The treasury notes. The Drovers. Com. Tucker captures
the Crown.

CHAPTER XXIX.
THE BRITISH ON THE PENOBSCOT.

Castine captured by the British. Preparations for defense at Hamp-
den. The engagement and retreat. Leading citizens impris-
oned. A bond and other exactions. The enemy at Bangor.
Robbery of stores. The town threatened by fire. Saved by a
bond. Flames in the night. Hampden rifled. Alarm on the
Kennebec. The militia at Wiscasset. They march to harass
the enemy. A part of Maine declared territory of Great
Britam. Expedition against Machias. Capture of a party of
the enemy. Commerce on the Penobscot. Treaty at Ghent.
The British evacuate Maine.

CHAPTER XXX.

THE SEPARATION AND ATTENDANT EVENTS.

Results of the war upon society. How the evil was met. Depres-
sion of manufactures. The Ohio fever. Affairs improve.
Separation voted. Slavery delays the admission of Maine to
the Union. Maine the twenty-second State. Gov. King.
Acts of first Legislature. Waterville College. Maine Wes-
leyan Seminary. Religious and other societies. Statistics of
Maine. No carriages. How people traveled. Mail coaches
introduced. Steamboats arrive. Lafayette's visit.

CHAPTER XXXI.
MEN AND AFFAIRS AFTER THE SEPARATION.

Governors Parris, Lincoln, Hunton and Smith. Northern bound-
ary of Maine. King of the Netherlands award. Removal
of the Capital. The State House. Governor Dunlap. Mad-
awaska settlements. Maine census officer arrested by the
British. Claims of Maine territory by the British. Appear-
ances of war. Disturbances in Canada. Burning of the Car-
oline. Military road through Aroostook. Conflict with a slave
state. Governor Kent. Representative Cilley falls in a duel.
Scientific survey.



XYI HISTOEY OF MAIXE.

Eiver Carry. Col. Enos returns. The Chaudiere. Flagstaff
Plantation. Mt. Bigelow. The accident. Bear broth. The
troops meet cattle. Defeat. Post offices. Maine a grand
military division. Independence declared. Colonel Eddy's
expedition. Colonel John Allan. His boys held as hostages.
British attack on Machias. Surrender of Burgoyne.

CHAPTER XXY.

EVENTS OF THE REVOLUTION ON SEA AND LAND.

Terrible fires. Hon. John Adams and Commodore Tucker. Three
British ships pursue the Boston. Tucker saves "that egg."
Capture of the Thorn. A French fleet. Maine made a Dis-
trict. British at Bigu3^duce, or Castine. Americans besiege
Castine. The embargo. The British on the Kennebec.
Capture of Gen. Wadsworth. His escape. More troops.
Capture of Cornwallis. More raids of the Canada Indians.
The treaty. Boundaries. Independence acknowledged.

CHAPTEE XXYI.
AFTER THE REVOLUTION.
Customs and dress of the wealthy. Of farmers and mechanics.
Of their wives and daughters. Indian dress, new style. New
settlers. Big pine trees. First American flag. Exports regu-
lated. First newspaper. The Bingham Purchase. Germans,
Scotch and Irish. Commercial districts. Governor Hancock.
Bowdoin college.

CHAPTER XXYH.

THE ]\IALTA WAR.

The Muscongus Patent. Major Gen. Knox. Lucy, his wife. The
old patents in new hands. Squatters. Murder of Chad wick.
Augusta invaded. The trial.

CHAPTER. XXYin.

THE WAR OF 1812.
Impressment of seamen. Little Belt. Commerce of Maine. Com.
Preble. Battle of the Enterprise and Boxer. Other suc-
cesses. Increase of manufacturers. The British at Eastport.



CONTENTS. XVII

The treasury notes. The Drovers. Com. Tucker captures
the Crown.

CHAPTER XXIX.

THE BRITISH ON THE PENOBSCOT.

Ca&tine captured by the British. Preparations for defense at Hamp-
den. The engagement and retreat. Leading citizens impris-
oned. A bond and other exactions. The enemy at Bangor.
Robbery of stores. The town threatened by fire. Saved by a
bond. Flames in the night. Hampden rifled. Alarm on the
Kennebec. The militia at Wiscasset. They march to harass
the enemy. A part of Maine declared territory of Great
Britain. Expedition against Machias. Capture of a party of
the enemy. Commerce on the Penobscot. Treaty at Ghent.
The British evacuate Maine.

CHAPTER XXX.
THE SEPARATION AND ATTENDANT EVENTS.

Results of the war upon society. How the evil was met. Depres-
sion Ox manufactures. The Ohio fever. Affairs improve.
Separation voted. Slavery delays the admission of Maine to
the Union. Maine the twenty-second State. Gov. King.
Acts of first Legislature. Waterville College. Maine Wes-
leyan Seminary. Religious and other societies. Statistics of
Maine. No carriages. How people traveled. Mail coaches
introduced. Steamboats arrive. Lafayette's visit.

CHAPTER XXXI.
MEN AND AFFAIRS AFTER THE SEPARATION.
Governors Parris, Lincoln, Hunton and Smith. Northern bound-
ary of Maine. King of the Netherlands award. Removal
of the Capital. The State House. Governor Dunlap. Mad-
awaska settlements. Maine census oflicer arrested by the
British. Claims of Maine territory by the British. Appear-
ances of war. Disturbances in Canada. Burning of the Car-
oline. Military road through Aroostook. Conflict with a slave
state. Governor Kent. Representative Cilley faUs in a duel.
Scientific survey.



XYIII HISTORY OF MAINE.

CHAPTEE XXXII.

THE AROOSTOOK WAR, AND FINAL SETTLEMENT
OF BOUNDARIES.

The British trespass on our timber lands. Two hiindred men sent
to eject them. Capture of the land agent. Sheriff Strick-
land's ride. Sir John Harvey announces that possession will
be retained by force. The eastern militia ordered out. A
draft ordered. Action of Congress. General Scott arrives.
Capture of the British land warden. Gen. Scott opens ne-
gotiations. Troops dismissed. The Great Pacificator. The
Webster and Ashburton treaty. Gov. Fairfield. Important


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Online LibraryGeorge J. (George Jones) VarneyThe young people's history of Maine; from its earliest discovery to the final settlement of its boundaries in 1842 → online text (page 1 of 20)