George S. (George Samuel) Clason.

Free homestead lands of Colorado described; a handbook for settlers online

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On account of the rich soil, dry farming is carried on with great success.
Grass is fairly abundant in the mountains. Located twelve miles from a
railroad. Elevation, 7,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Value,
$4 to $8 per acre.

Township 4 S., R. 92 W. The surface is mountainous and very rough,
with the exception of narrow strips of level, rolling lands along the valleys
of the creeks and along the bottoms of the gulches and canons. There are
small areas of mesa land in various portions of the township, usually on the
mountain tops. The soil varies from a poor sandy clay to a rich, deep loam
of remarkable fertility. The lands along the bottoms produce a fine grass
for grazing purposes. Some timber is in evidence. This is a beautiful country.
Located eight miles from a railroad. Elevation, 6,500 feet. Annual rainfall,
15 to 20 inches. Value, $4 to $10 per acre.

Township 5 S., R. 92 W. Fine crops are raised along the river and creek
bottoms, and many good ranches are to be found in this section. There is not
much timber, although along the slopes of the Big Hogback, cedar and pinon
timber is in evidence. Elevation, 6,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches.
Value, $4 to $8 per acre. Located two miles from a railroad.

Township 6 S., R. 92 W. Along Grand river, which crosses the township,
there are some very fine agricultural lands. To the north of the river there
is a low mesa country, called Cactus Valley, containing a few cedar and
pinon covered hills. South of the river the country is more broken, and just
west of Mann creek there is a very level mesa covered with dense under-
brush. Elevation, 5,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Crossed by
a railroad. Value, $5 to $10 per acre.

Township 7 S., R. 92 W. This township is a high mesa, covered mostly
with sage oak and patches of cedar and pinons. There are fertile lands along
the creek bottoms, well watered by running streams. A number of years ago,
when Ex-President Roosevelt made a hunting trip to this State, he killed
many bear hunting along the headwaters of Mann creek in this section.

Township 8 S., R. 92 W. The soil in this township varies from a light
red to a black, rich loam of good depth and fine texture. There are good



GARFIELD COUNTY 109



water holes in this section. The northern portion consists of mesa lands and
the bottom lands are suitable for cultivation. Farming is carried on here
both irrigation and the modified dry farming methods and are meeting with
good success. Distance from a railroad, ten miles. Elevation, 7,000 feet.
Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Value, $5 to $10 per acre. The western
half is included in the Battlement Mesa National Forest.

Township 4 S., R. 93 W. There is good soil in the creek valleys, also in
the uplands and wide flats and mesas. There is enough water in this township
to irrigate the bottom lands, but water must be brounght from a considerable
distance to irrigate the uplands. There is some coal in this section, and some
timber. Elevation, 6,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Located ten
miles from a railroad. Value, $4 to $10 per acre.

Township 5 S., R. 93 W. The southwest corner of this township is rough
and worthless. The northern portion is cut by the Great Hogback. Along
Government creek, which crosses the township diagonally in a northwestern
and southeastern direction, the soil is first-class. There are mesas on each
side of this creek, which, if cultivated, would produce corps of vegetables and
grains. Gypsum and coal are found in this township. Located three miles
from a railroad. Elevation, 6,000 feet. Value, $3.50 to $10 per acre. Annual
rainfall, 10 to 15 inches.

Township 6 S., R. 93 W. This township is crossed by the Grand river
and railroad. The southern and southeastern portions are extremely rough
and broken. Along the river and Rifle creek there are fine bottom lands,
which have all been taken up for the last thirty years. Elevation, 5,500 feet.
Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value, $5 to $8 per acre.

Township 7 S., R. 93 W. The lands in this township are nearly all moun-
tainous, consisting of rolling mesas and narrow valleys. The soil is mostly
a sandy loam, inclining to be rocky. Along the valleys there are rich patches
of narrow, black loam, suitable for farming. There is some timber in the
southern and northern portions. A rank growth of sage brush is to be found
in both the valleys and on the mesas. Distance from railroad, three miles
Value. $4 to $10 per acre. Elevation, 6,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15
inches.

Township 8 S., R. 93 W. This township lies high up on Battlement mesa,
with the exception of a small portion in the northeastern corner. In general, the
surface is mountainous and covered with oak and spruce timber. There is
also some good spruce timber on the high ridges. There is a fine supply of
water, making this an excellent grazing country. Elevation, 7,000 feet.
Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Located ten miles from a railroad. Value,
$3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 4 S., R. 94 W. Located on top of the Divide, between the
Grand and White rivers. This township is well watered by several creeks and
their branches. Some timber is in evidence. There is only a little land avail-
able for cultivation. Ten miles from a railroad. Elevation, 7,000 feet. An-
nual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Value, $4 to $8 per acre.



Township 5 S., R. 94 W. A very high, rough, mountainous township.
Only three sections have been surveyed. There is no agricultural land here.

Township 6 S., R. 94 W. This township is crossed by the Grand river
and railroad. The southern portion is well settled and all of the land is
under cultivation. The northern portion is very rough and mountainous, being
unfit for settlement or cultivation. Value, $3.50 per acre. Elevation, 6,000
f.ct. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches.



110 GARFIELD COUNTY



Township 7 S., R. 94 W. The southern half of this township is located
on the northern slope of the Battlement mesa and is included in the national
forest. It is very precipitous. In the northern portion the soil is very fertile.
The slopes are steep and covered with a natural growth of underbrush and
abundance of grass. There are fertile valleys along the creek bottoms. The
portion adjacent to the uplands are suited to cultivation. This is considered
by many to be an excellent dry farming district. There is some timber in the
township. Value, $4 to $8 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Eleva-
tion, 5,500 to 8,000 feet. One mile from railroad.

Township 5 S., R. 95 W. A rough, mountainous district unsurveyed.

Township 6 S., R. 95 W. The Grand river and railroad crosses the south-
ern portion of this district. Outside of the river valleys, which are all taken
up, the township lies on top of a very high mesa with steep precipitious sides.
There are small areas of land here available for cultivation. Value, $3.50
per acre. Elevation, 8,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches.

Township 7 S., R. 95 W. This township lies on the northwestern slope
of Battlement mesa. A large portion of the land is either excellent grazing
land or suitable for cultivation. The southern portion is very mountainous,
ranging to an altitude of 3,000 feet higher than the Grand river, which
crosses the northern portion. A small amount of timber is found here. A
railroad crosses this township. Elevation, 5,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to
15 inches. Value, $4 to $8 per acre.

Township 8 S., R. 95 W. The northeastern corner of this township is
the only portion not included in the national forest. Well watered by Wallace
creek and its tributaries. This is a good grazing district. The mountain
sides are covered with a dense growth of scrub oak. There is an abundance of
balsam and quaking asp timber. The soil on the creek bottoms is excellent.
Elevation, 6,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Located three miles
from a railroad. Value, $4 to $8 per acre.

Township 5 S., R. 96 W. A mountainous township not surveyed.

Township 6 S., R. 96 W. This township is mountainous in character and
used for grazing purposes except the bottoms of Parachute creek, and some
of the wider gulches where the land is level and gently rolling. There is a
little timber in this township. Most of the surface lies on top of high, inac-
cessible ridges. Value, $3.50 to $8 per acre. Elevation, 6,000 feet. Distance
from railroad, three miles. Annual Rainfall, 10 to 15 inches.

Township 7 S., R. 96 W. This township is crossed by the Grand river and
a railroad. Along the river bottoms there are some good agricultural lands.
The rest of the township is generally rocky and mountainous and of no value,
except for grazing. Elevation, 5,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches.
Value, $3.50 per acre.

Township 5 S., R. 97 W. This township is located on top of a high mesa
of an elevation of 8,500 feet, being too high for farming, but affords good
grazing. There is a little timber, and some springs are in evidence. Value
$3.50 per acre. Located fifteen miles from a railroad. Annual rainfall, 10 to
15 inches.

Township 6 S., R. 97 W. This township is very mountainous, composed
of rough ridges divided by streams; the gulches are high and rough. There
is considerable water found in many gulches and canyons, being sufficient
for stock. The soil is thin and poor, being unfit for cultivation. There is an



GARFIELD COUNTY 111



abundance of excellent grass in this township, making it well adapted for
grazing purposes. Pinon timber is quite plentiful and there is some pine
located on top of the high mesas. Elevation, 8,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10
to 15 inches. Distance from railroad, six miles. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 7 S., R. 97 W. A very mountainous township, composed prin-
cipally of ridges which are high, abrupt and rocky, divided by streams. The
soil is thin and poor, being unfit for cultivation. Water is found in the
ravines and gulches, which are generally dry a large portion of the year.
This is a fine grazing country, there being an abundance of blue grass. Some
timber. Elevation, 6,000 to 8,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches.
Value, $3.50 per acre. Distance from railroad, three miles.

Township 5 S., R. 98 W. This township lies on top of a high plateau
at an elevation of 8,500 feet. The elevation is too high for farming, conse-
quently this township is only fit for summer grazing. This district is rather
barren, the growth of grass being very scant. In the canyons there are a few
running creeks and along the ridges are found a few pines and scattering
groves of aspens. Distance from railroad, eighteen miles. Annual rainfall,
10 to 15 inches. Value, $3.50 per acre. Elevation, 8,000 feet.

Township 6 S., R. 98 W. A very mountainous, rough and broken town-
ship; the ridges dividing the streams are high, abrupt and rocky. Roan
creek carries running water. The soil is of poor quality and unfit for cul-
tivation. Aspen, pinon and spruce are found throughout the district. This
is a fine grazing section. Located twelve miles from a railroad. Elevation,
6,000 to 8,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value, $3.50 per acre.

Township 7 S., R. 98 W. A rough, broken, mountainous township. The
ridges between the water courses are high and rocky. There is some good
soil along Lone creek ; but in general it is quite sandy. There is an abundance
of running water and grass throughout, making this a good grazing section.
Pinon and cedar timber covers most of this district. Located five miles from
a railroad. Elevation, 6,000 feet. Value, $4 to $8 per acre. Annual rainfall,
10 to 15 inches.

Township 5 S., R. 99 W. A rough township on the southern slope of
Book Cliffs plateau. The southern portion is broken by canyons and almost
inaccessible. In the northwestern and northeastern corner the small streams
and low ridges afford good grazing during the summer. Most of this town-
ship lies at an elevation of about 8,000 feet and contains no agricultural
land. Distance from railroad, twenty miles. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15
inches. Value, $3.50 per acre.

Township 6 S., R. 99 W. A very rough, mountainous district; the ridges
between the streams being high and abrupt and very rocky. There is con-
siderable water in the gulches. The soil is too poor to cultivate, except
along the valley of the larger streams, where agricultural lands are quite
good. A good grazing district. The surface is covered with a scattering
growth of pinon, pine and cedar. Distance from railroad, fifteen miles.
Elevation, 6,000 to 8,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value, $3.50
to $5 per acre.

Township 7 S., R. 99 W. A very rough district, crossed east and west
by two barren, high, rolling mesas, the bluffs of which are rocky and abrupt.
Along the principal streams there is excellent soil, but in other portions of
the township the soil is very poor. There is considerable pinon timber and
an abundance of bunch and blue grass. This section is well adapted to graz-



GARFIELD COUNTY



ing purposes. Located twelve miles from a railroad. Elevation, 6,000 to
8,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 5 S., R. 100 W. This township is located on top of the Book
cliffs and is too high in altitude for agricultural purposes, not even good for
grazing. This is a rough, mountainous section. The timber is mostly
aspen and pine. Distance from railroad, thirty miles. Elevation, 8,500 feet.
Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value, $3.50 per acre.

Township 6 S., R. 100 W. A rough, mountainous township on the south-
ern slope of the Book cliffs; it is cut by high mesas and deep canyons. The
mesas are rough and rocky, covered with scattering pine and aspen timber.
There is an abundance of grass and water. Located at the headwaters 01
Roan creek. Distance from railroad, twenty miles. Elevation, 7,000 feet.
Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value, $3.50 per acre.

Township 7 S., R. 100 W. A very rough, broken district at the top of
Little Book cliffs. The streams run through deep canyons between abrupt
and rocky ridges. None of the soil is suitable for cultivation. There is an
abundance of grass and w r ater, making this section well adapted for graz-
ing purposes. Pinon and cedar timber is quite plentiful. Located fifteen
miles from a railroad. Eelevation, 6,000 to 8,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to
15 inches. Value, $3.50 per acre.

Township 5 S., R. 101 W. A high, mountainous, elevated plateau, with
considerable timber, consisting of pine, spruce and aspen. The sides of the
canyons, south of the divide, are very sharp, covered with blue joint grass,
while in the gulches rye grass prevails. This is a fair summer grazing dis-
trict, but too high and mountainous for winter grazing. There are no agri-
cultural lands.. Value, $3.50 per acre. Located eight miles from a railroad.
Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches .

Township 6 S., R. 101 W. In this district there is a little land at the
headwaters of the Salt Wash creek under cultivation by means of irrigation
The rest of the township is rough and mountainous. Scrub cedar and pinon
timber is found on the high places and there are a few groves of aspen. This
is a good grazing section. Located fifteen miles from a railroad. Elevation,
6,000 to 8,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value, $3.50 to $5
per acre.

Township 7 S., R. 101 W. This township is principally rough and moun-
tainous. There is very little agricultural land. What land there is suitable
for agriculture is along the benches of Salt W r ash creek, which would require
irrigation, this would mean the construction of storage reservoirs. The tim-
ber is nearly all scrub cedar, pinon and aspen, with a few groves of pine.
Most of this township is covered with an undergrowth of scrub oak and
sage brush and is well adapted to grazing, being covered with a fine growth
of nutritious grasses. Elevation, 7,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches.
Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre. Located fifteen miles from a railroad.

Township 5 S. R. 102 W. A very rough mountainous township on top
of Roan plateau. There is considerable growth of scattering pine, spruce and
aspen timber. This is a good summer range for cattle. Too high for winter
range and contains no agricultural lands. Located one mile from railroad.
Value, $3.50 per acre. Elevation, 7,000 to 9,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to
15 inches.

Township 6 S., R. 102 W. A mountainous township on the southern
slope of Roan plateau and at the headwaters of East Salt creek. The soil



GARFIELD COUNTY 113



is generally poor. There is considerable scrub cedar and pinon; also an un-
dergrowth of scrub oak and sage brush. The surface is generally moun-
tainous. This is a grazing district only. Located eight miles from a rail-
road. Elevation, 6,000 to 8,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value,
$3.50 per acre.

Township 7 S., R. 102 W. This township is wholly mountainous. There
is a little grass, sage brush and grease wood with an abundance of scrub
cedar and pinon throughout the rocky portions. There are occasional alka-
line water holes, but no living streams. No coal indications in this town-
ship, but a brown shale is found that burns with the odor of naptha. Eleva-
tion, 5,000 to 6,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Located eight
miles from railroad. Value, $3.50 per acre.

Township 5 S., R. 103 W. A rough, mountainous township on the crest
of Roan plateau, being on the divide between the Grand and White rivers.
In general it is covered with a scattering growth of spruce, pine and aspen
timber. Rye grass grows in most of the gulches. There are good springs
of living water in sections 14 and 15. There is also water in most of the
gulches, near their heads, but it disappears and sinks in the rough, sandy
soil. This township is a fine summer range for stock, but too high for any
other purposes. Elevation, 7,000 to 8,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15
inches. Value, $3.50 per acre. A railroad crosses this township.

Township 6 S., R. 103 W. A rough and mountainous section, covered
with scrub cedar and pinon, also with a dense undergrowth of sage brush.
The entire township is well adapted to stock grazing and raising on account
of it being covered with a good growth of nutritious grasses. Stock can
feed here all year round on the open range. Coal formations extend through
the township and there is an abundance of water for stock, but not enough
for irrigation unless retained by storage reservoirs, in which case a few
small patches could be placed under cultivation. This district is crossed by
a railroad. Elevation, 6,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value,
$3.50 per acre.

Township 7 S., R. 103 W. This township is what is known as the Fruita.
desert and is considered to include the best winter range in this part of the
State. Water could be placed on this land as the soil is good and the sur-
face is comparatively level, although broken by some arroyos and gulches.
The northern section is mountainous and is covered with a dense growth of
sage, greasewood and rabbit brush. The water in this township is alkaline
Located three miles from a railroad. Value, $4 to $8 per acre. Annual rain-
fall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 5,000 to 7,000 feet.

Township 5 S., R. 104 W. An unsurveyed township.

Township 6 S., R. 104 W. The surface of this township is rough and
mountainous throughout, having but very little agricultural land; and is in
general covered with a line growth of good, nutritious grasses. This section
is well adapted to grazing. There is some poor timber, but quite a dense
growth of oak and sage brush. There is plenty of water in springs and
holes for stock. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 7,000 to 8,000
feet. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 7 S., R. 104 W. The surface is generally rough and moun-
tainous. This township contains but a few small patches of agricultural
land. There is considerable cedar and pinon timber, especially the southern
part. This district contains some coal lands. There is plenty of water in
the springs and water holes for stock. This is an arid section requiring irri-



114 GILPIN COUNTY



gati
fall,



tion for farming. This township is crossed by a railroad. Annual rain-
10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 5,000 to 7,000 feet. Value, $4 to $6 per acre.

Note: Townships 8 S., Ranges 94 to 104 West will be found under Mesa
county.



GILPIN COUNTY

DENVER LAND DISTRICT Area of Vacant Lands, 16,060 Acres.

The first discovery of gold in a vein or lead in Colorado was first made
at Central City, in Gilpin county. This is a very small county, being only
about 12 square miles. It is located high up in the mountains, and the west-
ern boundary is along the Continental divide. The elevation is from 8,000 to
13,000 feet above sea level. It is strictly a mining country and for fifty
years has been adding steadily millions and millions of dollars to the world's
wealth of gold. The first commercial radium was made from the pitchblend
ores of Gilpin county. A detailed description of the vacant lands in this
county will be omitted as those not mineral lands are ordinary grazing lands.
Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.



GRAND COUNTY

DENVER LAND DISTRICT Area of Vacant Lands, 197,440 Acres.

Grand county, or Middle park, as it is more commonly known, is a large,
natural park practically surrounded by high mountain ranges. The moun-
tains, except where they are above timber line, are well covered with a heavy
growth of pine and spruce timber and are nearly all included in the National
forests.

This county is very well watered by creeks nourished by the snows on
the mountains, forming the headwaters of the Grand river. Grand lake, one
of the largest natural lakes in the State, and one of the most popular pleas-
ure resorts in the west, is located in this county.

About five years ago, the Denver and Salt Lake railroad was
built across the Continental divide from Denver, and crosses Grand county
on its way to Salt Lake.

For some reason, perhaps because the country further west had been bet-
ter advertised as the land of opportunity, few settlers have gone into Grand
county, even though it is now opened up by the railroad. The population is
very nominal for the size of the county.

It is an excellent stock country. The mountains are well watered by
live streams, and along the streams are fertile valleys. Not to exceed one-
third of the land area, not included in the forests, has been taken up. Those
looking for opportunities to go into the stock business would do well to look
into Grand county.

The streams in this county are well stocked with fish and there is
plenty of wild game of all kinds, native to Colorado, to be found in the moun-
tains.

The approximate value per year of the agricultural products is as fol-
lows:

Cereals $ 10,000.00

Hay 250,000.00

Vegetables and other crops 25,000.00

The total population of Grand county is 1,862. Hot Sulphur Springs, the
county seat, has a population of 200.

The climate of Grand county is quite even; that is to say, there are but
few intensely warm days and but few intensely cold ones. The farmer can
begin his seeding in the middle of April and can count on the season being
open until the middle of November. This gives him ample time after the
harvest season to do his fall plowing. An occasional frost has no effect upon
the high altitude crops, and the quality of the product is made better be-
cause of the cool nights. Grand county lands will raise an average of fifty
bushels of wheat per acre, year in and year out. Crops which do exception-
ally well and come to the fullest maturity are barley, oats, alfalfa, spring
wheat, timothy, alsike, clover and stock beets. Grains raised at this altitude
have a much greater weight than those raised in lower altitudes.

Township 1 S., R. 75 W. The character of the land in this township is
above the average in the park. The bottom lands are exceptionally good.



116 GRAND COUNTY



The grass is very fine, especially that on the bottoms of Fraser river and
along St. Louis and Hamilton creeks. The eastern and southern portions are
very mountainous and the rest is rolling and covered with small parks. The east-
ern part is included in the Arapahoe national forest and is covered with fine
white pine and spruce timber. The township is crossed by the railroad and
well watered with good streams. Value, $5 to $10 per acre. Annual rainfall,
15 to 20 inches. Elevation, 8,000 feet. Four miles from the railroad.

Township 4 N., R. 75 W. This township is very rough and mountainous.



Online LibraryGeorge S. (George Samuel) ClasonFree homestead lands of Colorado described; a handbook for settlers → online text (page 12 of 39)