George S. (George Samuel) Clason.

Free homestead lands of Colorado described; a handbook for settlers online

. (page 18 of 39)
Online LibraryGeorge S. (George Samuel) ClasonFree homestead lands of Colorado described; a handbook for settlers → online text (page 18 of 39)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


sloping to the south. There is more or less pinon, pine and cedar timber.
There are a number of basins in the central and southern portions with
fine grass. Very little surface water. Value, $4 to $7 per acre. A railroad
runs within a half mile east of the boundary. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15
inches. Elevation, 6,500 feet.

Township 33 N., R. 10 W. This township is mostly hills and mesa
land; but all is valuable either for agricultural or grazing purposes. The
timber is mostly aspen. Not much surface water. The valley of the Rio
de Las Animas and a railroad runs along the eastern boundary. The level
bottom lands have been all taken up, but other portions of the township
look very promising for homeseekers. Value, $5 to $8 per acre. Annual
rainfall, 12 to 18 inches. Elevation, 6,500 feet.

Township 34 N., R. 10 W. This is a rolling, hilly township, naturally
covered with a fine growth of grass and timbered with pine, pinon and
cedars. A railroad runs along the eastern boundary. Value, $5 to $7 per
acre. Annual rainfall, 12 to 18 inches. Elevation, 6,500 feet.

Township 35 N., R. 10 W. With the exception of the southeastern por-
tion, the surface of this township is badly broken with steep ridges and
high parks. There are valuable timber and coal lands here. Value, $3.50
to $10 per acre. This township is crossed by railroad, and lies west of
Durango. Annual rainfall, 15 inches. Elevation, 7,000 feet.

Township 32 N., R. 11 W. The surface of this township is a series of
mesas, separated by level sagebrush plains. The streams are dry most
of the time. There is a little timber along the ridges. The soil is of fail-
quality. Distance from railroad, six miles. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.
Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Elevation, 6,000 feet.



LA PLATA COUNTY 157



Township 33 N., R. 11 W. The surface of this township is made up of
a series of more or less broken mesas, separated and drained by arroyos in
little valleys. Heavy pinon and cedars grow on the uplands, while the
valleys are filled with rank sage brush. There are indications of coal.
Water is scarce. The soil is deep and rich. Grass very scanty and timber
has little or no commercial value. Distance from railroad, six miles. Value,
$5 to $8 per acre. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Elevation, 6,500 feet.

Township 34 N., R. 11 W. The southeastern portion of this township,
in which the vacant lands occur, is high mesa land, crossed by rocky ridges,
covered with a dense growth of sage and oak brush and quite a little cedar.
Distance from railroad, one mile. Value, $4 to $6 per acre. Annual rain-
fall, 15 to 20 inches. Elevation, 7,000 feet.

Township 35 N., R. 11 W. This township is generally mountainous and
a coal mining section. The lands are adapted for grazing, but not for agri-
culture. Heavy pine timber abundant in many parts. Other sections are
rough and mountainous without timber, but well covered with grass. Value,
$5 per acre. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Elevation, 7,500 feet. Crossed
by railroad.

Township 32 N., R. 12 W. This is a fractional township, only three miles
wide by four miles north and south, on the extreme southern boundary of
Colorado, adjoining the New Mexico state line. The surface is generally rocky
and broken, with a notable absence of grass; timber of a scrubby growth,
being mostly pine and cedar, with frequent outcroppings of coal. There is no
surface water, with the exception of a soda spring. Distance from railroad,
twelve miles. Value, $3.50 per acre. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Eleva-
tion, 6,000 feet.

Township 33 N., R. 12 W. The southern and eastern parts of this town-
ship are cut up by deep canons and covered with a dense growth of pine, cedar
and pinon timber. The soil is a rich, sandy loam. There are coal indications
in some places. Value, $5 to $15 per acre. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches.
Elevation, 6,500 feet. Distance from railroad, twelve miles.

Township 34 N., R. 12 W. The surface of this township is broken and
rolling. It is crossed by the La Plata river and several good size creeks.
Most of the township is settled and under irrigation. Good grass in all
portions and more or less timber along the ridges. Value, $5 to $8 per
acre. Distance from railroad, five miles. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches.
Elevation, 6,500 feet.

Township 35 N., R. 12 W. The surface of this township is rough and
broken. Spruce, cedar, pine and cottonwood timber found throughout the
township. It is crossed by one small stream, Cherry creek. Not much
of a farming section, but fine for stock. There are some natural meadows
in the gulches. Good grass everywhere. Distance from railroad, one mile.
Value, $5 to $10 per acre. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Elevation, 7,500
feet.

Township 32 N., R. 13 W. The only agricultural lands are along the
La Plata river. Sections 14, 15, 22 and 23 contain extensive coal deposits.
The balance of the township is cut up by canyons and covered with a thick
growth of pine, pinon and cedar timber. Value, $3.50 per acre. Distance
from railroad, fifteen miles. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Elevation,
6,000 feet.

Township 33 N., R. 13 W. The surface is high mesa lands. The south-
eastern portion is mountainous and cut by deep ravines. The southern and



158 LA PLATA COUNTY



western portions are covered with dense pinon timber, excepting along the
ravines, where some good grass is to be found. The central and northern
portions are covered with scattering pinons and cedars and sage brush. The
soil is good. No water for irrigation. Value, $5 to $7 per acre. Annual
rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Elevation, 6,500 feet. Distance from railroad,
eighteen miles.

Township 34 N., R. 13 W. This township contains land of nearly every
description, from fine farming lands to worthless rocky ridges. Only one
small stream of flowing water in the township. No attempt has been made
to find water by drilling nor by digging wells. Value, $5 to $10 per acre.
Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Elevation, 7,000 feet. Distance from rail-
road, ten miles.



LARIMER COUNTY

DENVER LAND DISTRICT Area of Vacant Lands, 339,960 Acres.

Larimer county is located in the north-central portion of Colorado, ad-
joining the Wyoming state line. It is bounded on the west by the Medicine
Bow range of mountains. In the eastern portion of the county is the Poudrc
valley; the rest of the county is rough and mountainous, interspersed with
fine valleys and open parks. Fort Collins, the county seat, has a population
of 8,500. The Poudre valley is a highly cultivated and very productive
district, raising grains, potatoes, sugar beets and large quantities of berries.

In the southwestern corner of Larimer county is located the famous
Estes park, near which has just been created the Rocky Mountain national
park. This is a very rugged section of the State and will always be pre-
served by the government for its scenery.

The mountainous sections of Larimer county are very sparsely settled,
although they are interspersed with many fertile little valleys that are at-
tractive to the eye and would prove profitable as places of residence to
those desiring to go into the stock raising business.

A large part of the mountainous section of the county is included in
the Colorado national forest.

The approximate value per year of the agricultural products is as
follows :

Sugar beets $1,500,000.00

Wheat and cereals 1,000,000.00

Hay 900,000.00

Vegetables 200,000.00

Other important towns, besides Fort Collins, are Loveland, with a
population of 4,000; Berthoud, with a population of 900.

Larimer county is well watered by the Poudre river and the Big Thomp-
son river. The mountainous sections are very attractive to the tourist
for hunting, fishing and sightseeing.

Township 9 N., R. 68 W. The surface slopes westward from a ridge
on the eastern line and all except the extreme northwestern corner is under
irrigation. The soil is a sandy loam. There is good natural grasses. There
is no surface water outside of the irrigation systems. Value, $10 to $12
per acre. This township is crossed by the railroad. Annual rainfall, 10 to
15 inches. Elevation, 5,500 feet.

Township 10 N., R. 68 W. The surface is gently rolling on the western
half; inclining to be hilly on the eastern half. Section 24 is quite rough.
Value, $5 to $6 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 5,000
feet. Railroad crosses this township.

Township 5 N., R. 69 W. The northeastern corner of this township is
cut by hogbacks or sandstone ridges. The only land vacant is on top of
these, and worthless,



160 LARIMER COUNTY



Township 6 N., R. 69 W. The western portion of this township is
traversed by precipitous sandstone ridges running north and south. The
only vacant lands in this township are on top of these ridges and worth-
less.

Township 8 N., R. 69 W. The only vacant lands in this township are
on top of stony, rocky ridges and of no value.

Township 9 N., R. 69 W. The only vacant lands in this township are
in the extreme western edge lying to top along the rocky ridges and are of
no value.

Township 10 N., R. 69 W. Most of this township is good dry farming
land, comparatively level. The soil is a sandy loam. The surface of the
two western tiers of sections very broken, not suitable for farming. The
northern part of Section 4 lies on a steep hillside, not suitable for cultiva-
tion. Value, $5 to $8 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation,
5,500 feet. Four miles from the railroad.

Township 11 N., R. 69 W. The surface is generally broken by ridges
and gullies; some parts are hilly and some fairly level. The soil is a
sandy loam, with outcrops of rock. Fair grazing. Very little surface
water. Value, $8 to $12 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Eleva-
tion, 6,000 feet. Five miles from the railroad.

Township 12 N., R. 69 W. This is a fractional township adjoining the
Wyoming state line. The surface is broken and hilly. Water scarce. There
is no timber. The soil is a sandy loam with rock outcrops. Fair grazing.
Very little surface water. Not suitable for farming. Value, $5 to $8 per
acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 6,500 feet. Six miles from
the railroad.

Township 4 N., R. 70 W. This is rough mountainous land, suitable for
grazing only. Some timber. Plenty of water. Value, $5 to $10 per acre.
Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Elevation, 5,500 feet. Three miles from the
railroad.

Township 5 N., R. 70 W. All the valleys and agricultural lands have
been taken in this township, leaving only the rough broken mountainous
lands. There is some timber. Generally, fair grazing. Value, $3.50 to $8
per acre. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Elevation, 5,500 feet. Five miles
from the railroad.

Township 6 N., R. 70 W. This is rough mountainous land, partly rock.
There is quite a growth of pine and spruce trees. The small valleys along
the creeks are all taken up. Value, $3.50 to $8 per acre. Annual rainfall,
15 to 20 inches. Elevation, 6,000 feet. Five miles to the railroad.

Township 7 N., R. 70 W. The surface of this township is mountainous
and badly broken; very rocky. The soil is sandy and gravelly. Valley land
all taken up. Value, $3.50 to $8 per acre. Plenty of surface water. Annual
rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Elevation, 6,000 feet. One mile from the rail-
road.

Township 8 N., R. 70 W. With the exception of the valley in the east-
ern portion, this township is all rough and mountainous; it is crossed by
numerous creeks and gulches and also by the Poudre river. The land suit-
able for cultivation is all taken up; the only vacant land is mountainous,
valuable only for what little timber there is and grazing purposes. Reached
by spur railroad. Value of vacant lands, $7 per acre. Good water. Annual
rainfall, 15 inches. Elevation, 6,000 feet.



LARIMER COUNTY 161



Township 9 N., R. 70 W. The surface is nearly all mountainous. The
small area, suitable for agriculture, all taken. Reached by a spur railroad.
Value, $3.50 to $8 per acre. Elevation, 5,500 to 7,000 feet. Annual rainfall,
10 to 15 inches.

Township 10 N., R. 70 W. The northern and central portions of this
township are of a sandstone formation; the eastern portion is clay and
limestone and the southern and western granite. It consists of alternate
ranges of hills and fertile valleys. The valleys of the Stonewall and Lone
Blue creeks and the North Poudre river are well watered and produce large
quantities of hay, vegetables and small grains. The mountains are covered
with good nutritious grasses and in the northwestern part with a scattered
growth of pine timber. Stock raising and hay farming, the principal in-
dustries. Value, $3.50 to $10 per acre. Nine miles from the railroad. An-
nual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Elevation, 6,000 feet.

Township 11 N., R. 70 W. The eastern portion is hilly and broken; in
the western portion, although the surface is hilly, it has much rolling
ground. Good sandy loam. Well watered. Fine grazing. Some timber.
Elevation, 6,000 to 7,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Value, $3.50
to $7 per acre. Ten miles from the railroad.

Township 12 N., R. 70 W. The eastern portion is rather rough and
hilly with some timber and excellent grass; the western portion is rolling
with meadow land; well watered and with good soil. Elevation, 6,500 to
7,000 feet. Value, $3.50 to $8 per acre. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches.
Twelve miles from the railroad.

Township 4 N., R. 71 W. The agricultural lands in this township are
limited to small parks and valleys; many of these being occupied and cul-
tivated. There is good grazing, especially in the eastern part. There is
some timber. Plenty of water. Elevation, 5,800 to 8,500 feet. Annual rain-
fall, 15 to 20 inches. Value, $5 to $13 per acre. Three miles from the railroad.

Township 5 N., R. 71 W. The surface is mountainous, rough, broken
and rocky. There are some small parks and valleys available for farm-
ing; these are all taken up. There is some timber. Good grazing land.
Value, $5 to $8 per acre. Elevation, 6,500 to 8,500 feet. Annual rainfall,
15 to 20 inches. Eleven miles from the railroad.

Township 6 N., R. 71 W. This is a very rough, mountainous township.
There is no available tillable land unclaimed. Scattered pine timber. Value.
$2 to $8 per acre. Elevation, 6,200 to 10,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20
inches. Eleven miles from the railroad.

Township 7 N., R. 71 W. The surface is very mountainous. There is a
fair stand of timber in portions. Well watered with running streams. All
lands adapted for cultivation already picked out by settlers. Elevation,
6,000 to 8,800 feet. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20
inches. Eight miles from the railroad.

Township 8 N., R. 71 W. The surface is rough and mountainous. There
are few narrow valleys, but well taken up. Scattered timber. Well watered
with running streams. Fair grazing. Value, $5 to $6 per acre. Elevation,
6,000 to 8,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 inches. Five miles from the rail-
road.

Township 9 N., R. 71 W. The surface is rough and mountainous. Land
suitable for cultivation already taken. Some timber. Plenty of running



162 LARIMER COUNTY



streams. Elevation, 6,000 to 7,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches.
Value, $3.50 to $10 per acre. Six miles from the railroad.

Township 10 N., R. 71 W. The surface is broken and mountainous, but
along the creek bottom and gulches is fine agricultural land. There is con-
siderable timber. Plenty of water. Fair grazing. Elevation, 6,500 to 7,000
feet. Value, $3.50 to $7 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Fifteen
miles from the railroad.

Township 11 N., R. 71 W. The eastern one-third of this township is a
high grassy plateau, well adapted to the culture of small grains without
irrigation. The balance of the township is mountainous and broken, al-
though containing some good valleys. There is considerable timber in the
northwestern portion. Elevation, 6,500 to 7,000 feet. Value, $3.50 to $8
per acre. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Sixteen miles from the rail-
road.

Township 12 N., R. 71 W. The surface is mountainous with small val-
leys and rolling hills. The soil is excellent. Well watered. Considerable of
this township is under cultivation. Elevation, 6,800 to 7,500 feet. Annual
rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Value, $3.50 to $8 per acre. Ten miles from the
railroad.

Township 4 N., R. 72 W. This township is very mountainous. There
are some natural parks and valleys, but the good land has already been
taken up. The surface is generally well covered with timber. Elevation,
7,500 to 10,000 feet. Fair grazing land. Value, $5 to $6 per acre. Annual
rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Ten miles from the railroad.

Township 5 N., R. 72 W. The eastern portion of this township is rough,
rocky and barren, with poor timber and grass, excepting along the bottom
of the Big Thompson. The western half is much better, forming the eastern
portion of Estes park, in which there are some fine hay lands and good tim-
ber. The altitude is very high. The desirable lands are very well taken
up in this township. Elevation, 7,000 to 9,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to
20 inches. Value vacant lands, $5 to $8 per acre. Eighteen miles from the
railroad.

Township 6 N., R. 72 W. The northwestern portion of this township is
covered by the Colorado national forest. The rest is rough and mountain-
ous. Fairly good grazing. Some fair timber. Elevation, 7,000 to 9,500 feet.
Value, $3.50 to $8 per acre. Well watered. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20
inches. Eighteen miles from the railroad.

Township 7 N., R. 72 W. This township is mountainous and is mostly
included in the Colorado national forest. There is considerable timber and
plenty of water. Very poor grazing land. It is partially covered with fallen
and burnt timber. Elevation, 7,000 to 10,000 feet. Too high for agriculture.
Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Value, $2 to $5 per acre. Twelve miles
from the railroad.

Township 8 N. R. 72 W. This township is all included in the Colorado
National forest, excepting Section 1, which is a steep hillside and worthless,
excepting for timber and grazing purposes.

Township 9 N., R. 72 W. Through the central part of this township,
east and west, the country is well open and adapted to stock raising. It is
rough in the southern and northern portions. Plenty of running water in
streams. There are a few trees. Elevation, 7,000 to 8,000 feet. Annual



LARIMER COUNTY 163



rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value, $5 to $8 per acre. Twelve miles from the
railroad.

Township 10 N., R. 72 W. The surface is rough and mountainous with
considerable pine and spruce timber, some of it is very heavy. The creek
bottoms in the northern part of the township carry very fine grass and the
soil is good. Elevation, 6,700 to 8,000 feet. Value, $5 to $8 per acre. An-
nual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Twenty-five miles from the railroad.

Township 11 N., R. 72 W. This township is mountainous and broken.
It is covered with a good growth of pine and spruce timber. The valleys
are generally narrow. The soil is very fertile, producing fine crops of small
grains and vegetables. Irrigation unnecessary. Fair grazing in the moun-
tainous sections. There is some timber. Elevation, 6,500 to 8,000 feet. Value,
$6 to $16 per acre. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Fifteen miles from the
railroad.

Township 12 N., R. 72 W. The surface is broken and mountainous. There
is a scattered growth of pine and spruce timber. Elevation, 7,500 to 8,000
feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Value, $4 to $8 per acre. Ten miles
from the railroad.

Township 4 N., R. 73 W. This township is quite rough and mountainous,
in the southern portion raising to an elevation of 14,000 feet at the crest of
Long's peak. The western portion is included in the Colorado national forest.
In the northern part there is some park land, being in the Estes park dis-
trict. No available land suitable for cultivation. Value, $2 to $5 per acre.
Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Twenty-five miles from the railroad.

Township 5 N., R. 73 W. This township includes the famous Estes Park,
the largest and most important summer resort in the mountains of Colo-
rado. There is no vacant land of value in the townhsip.

Township 9 N., R. 73 W. Mountainous and rough. Scattered pine tim-
ber. Well watered. Fairly good grazing section. Some good timber. Value,
$5 to $15 per acre. Elevation, about 7,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20
inches. Value, $5 to $15 per acre. Twenty miles from railroad.

Township 10 N., R. 73 W. This township is mountainous, the northern
part being pretty well broken and covered with a good growth of pine and
spruce timber. Good grazing. Well watered. Some land suitable for cul-
tivation. Value, $3.50 to $8 per acre. Elevation, above 7,500 feet. Annual
rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Twenty miles from railroad.

Township 11 N., R. 73 W. The surface is mountainous. Well timbered
with pine and spruce. Plenty of water. Good grazing. Value, $5 to $8 per
acre. Elevation, above 7,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to 25 inches. Ten
miles from railroad.

Township 12 N., R. 73 W. The surface is hilly. The soil sandy and
rocky, covered with bunch grass. There is scattered pine and spruce timber.
Very well watered from small streams. Elevation, 8,000 feet. Value, $3 to $5
per acre. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Ten miles from railroad.

Township 10 N., R. 74 W. This township is all mountainous. The south-
western portion is included in the Colorado national forest. There is a dense
growth of pine and spruce. Plenty of water. Good grazing. Annual rainfall,
15 to 20 inches. Twenty miles from railroad. Elevation, 9,000 feet.



164 LARIMER COUNTY



Township 11 N., R. 74 W. This township is mountainous and decidedly
broken. Not adapted for the settler. Well watered with small streams.
Fine growth of timber. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre. Annual rainfall, 15 to
20 inches. Eighteen miles from railroad.

Township 12 N., R. 74 W. The sun ace is rolling. The soil sandy and
rocky. There is a fair growth of buffalo ana bunch grass. This township ad-
joins the Wyominpr state line. Suitable only for stock-raising. Value, $3.50
to $5 per acre. Fifteen miles from railroad. Elevation. 8,000 feet. Rainfall,
15 to 20 inches.

Township 11 N., R. 75 W. The surface is mostly mountainous. Some
hay is cut along Sand creek, which runs northeast through the township.
The southeastern portion is covered with pine and spruce timber of a fail-
quality. This township suitable only for stock raising. Value, $3.50 to $5
per acre. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Elevation, 8,000 feet. Twenty
miles from railroad.

Township 12 N., R. 75 W. The surface is mountainous, rolling and hilly.
It is covered with good grass. The soil is sandy and rocky in places. Sand
creek flows through the township. The land is of little value excepting for
stock raising. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 10 N., R. 76 W. Most of this township is included in the Colo-
rado national forest. It is crossed by Laramie river. The rainfall is suffi-
cient for crops. It is partially mountainous and partially bottom land. There
are good hay lands along the rivers and creeks. This valley is well adapted
to the culture of small grain and vegetables. Value, $3.50 to $12 per acre.
Elevation, 8,000 feet. Amount of rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Thirty miles
from the railroad.

Township 11 N., R. 76 W. This township is partially mountainous and
partially valley land. Along the Laramie river and tributary creeks is good
agricultural land. This township is well watered. There is a little available
timber. Aside from the valley land, the surface of this township is a second
grade of grazing land. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre. Elevation, 8,000 feet.
Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Twenty miles from railroad.

Township 12 N., R. 76 W. The surface of this township is generally
mountainous but covered with a luxurious growth of grass. Very little tim-
ber. There is water in the gulches, sufficient for all purposes. Value, $5 to
$12 per acre. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Elevation, 8,500 feet. Twenty
miles from railroad.

Township 11 N., R. 77 W. The surface of this township is nearly all
mountainous. The southwestern portion is included in the Colorado national
forest and is covered with pine and spruce timber. In the eastern portion
there is little timber. The mountains are rolling and covered with the best
of grass. This is a good stock country. Value, $3.50 to $10 per acre.

Township 12 N., R. 77 W. The surface is mostly mountainous. The



Online LibraryGeorge S. (George Samuel) ClasonFree homestead lands of Colorado described; a handbook for settlers → online text (page 18 of 39)