George S. (George Samuel) Clason.

Free homestead lands of Colorado described; a handbook for settlers online

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Online LibraryGeorge S. (George Samuel) ClasonFree homestead lands of Colorado described; a handbook for settlers → online text (page 28 of 39)
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Township 38 N., R. 20 W. The surface of this township is cut by deep
canyons and the mesas are heavily timbered with scrub cedar and pinon;
there is a dense undergrowth of sage and buckbrush. This township affords
good range for stock. The soil on the mesa is of fine quality. Aztec ruins
abound here. Distance from railroad, thirty miles. Value, $3.50 per acre.
Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 6,000 feet.

Township 39 N., R. 20 W. The southern portion of this township is cut
by deep canyons, but the northern portion is high rolling, mesas, covered
with sage brush and scattering pinons and cedars. Good soil and good
grass, but a scarcity of water. Value, $3.50 per acre. Distance from rail-
road, fifteen miles. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 6,000 feet.



MONTROSE COUNTY

MONTROSE LAND DISTRICT Area Vacant Lands, 476,061 Acres.

Montrose county is located in the west-central portion of Colorado,
adjoining the Utah state line on the west. In this county is located the very
productive Uncompahgre valley, irrigated from the waters of the Gunnison
river, through a six-mile tunnel, constructed by the United States Reclamation
service.

This county is divided by the Uncompahgre Plateau, a high rolling table
land, covered with timber and included in the Uncompahgre National forest.

The western portion of Montrose county is a fertile country of valleys
and plateaus, being rapidly developed.

Montrose county is comparatively sparsely settled outside of the irrigated
districts, the total population of the county being less than 12,000, while the
population of Montrose, the county seat and largest town, is 3,500.

The approximate value per year of the agricultural products is as follows :

Wheat and other grains $300,000.00

Hay 650,000.00

Vegetables 300,000.00

Fruits 400,000.00

Other crops 75,000.00

Township 47 N., R. 6 W. This township consists of fine grazing and agri-
cultural land except in the southeastern part, which is composed of a high
mesa. Most of the township can be irrigated. There is a scattering growth
of oak, pinon, cedar and pine. Elevation, 8,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20
inches. Located six miles from a railroad. Value, $5 to $10 per acre.

Township 48 N., R. 6 W. There is fine grazing and agricultural land in
this township except in the northeastern portion, which is cut by canons and
ridges. There is a scattering growth of cedar, scrub oak and pinon timber.
The northern portion of this district is crossed by the Gunnison river and
railroad. Elevation, 7,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Value, $5 to
$10 per acre.

Township 49 N., R. 6 W. The surface is largely mountainous or high,
rolling mesa land. The Gunnison river crosses in a canon of 2,000 feet in
depth. There are several settlers in the valley of Crystal creek and farming
is carried on to some extent. Timothy hay and vegetables being the principal
crops. Most of this township consists of good grazing land. There are some
quaking aspen and spruce timber in the eastern portion. Good water is plenti-
ful. Elevation, 7,000 to 9,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value,
$3.50 to $5 per acre. Located two miles from railroad.

Township 50 N., R. 6 W. The surface varies from valleys to high ridges
and hills. The soil of the valley is a loam and that of the rolling and hilly
country adobe. Both are capable of producing abundant crops under irriga-
tion. This township is well watered by numerous streams and has a scatter-
ing growth of pine, cedar, sage and oak brush. Elevation, 8,000 feet. Annual
rainfall, 10 to 15 inches, Located six miles from a railroad. Value, $6 to $10
per acre,



232 MONTROSE COUNTY



Township 51 N., R. 6 W. The northwestern portion of this township is
covered with a good growth of bunch grass and is well watered bv springs and
creeks. The northern portion is mostly made up of high adobe ridges and hills,
being covered with a thick growth of cedar and pinon timber. There are some
good farm lands along the creek bottoms. Located ten miles from a railroad.
Elevation, 7,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Value, $5 to $10
per acre.

Township 47 N., R. 7 W. The greater portion of this township lies at an
elevation of above 9,000 feet, and is too high for agricultural purposes; but
this is an excellent grazing district. Located five miles from a railroad. An-
nual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 48 N., R. 7 W. This is an unsurveyed township.

Township 49 N., R. 7 W. This township is crossed by the Gunnison river,
which flows through a canon 2,000 feet deep, and also by a railroad. Only
the southwestern quarter is surveyed; the balance being too high and rough
for agricultural purposes, but a good grazing section. The soil is very fertile
in the valleys and on the mesas. Potatoes and alfalfa yield well where irri-
gated. There is plenty of scrub cedar and quaking aspen, but very little tim-
ber suitable for lumber. This district is well provided with spring water.
The Gunnison tunnel is located in this township. Elevation, 7,000 to 9,000 feet.
Value, $4 to $6 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches.

Township 50 N., R. 7 W. The surface of this township is quite varied
in its topography with many varieties of soil. This district is crossed by the
Black canon of the Gunnison river, and there are high mesas on each side.
On the mesa and in the gulches the loam is rich and capable of producing
good crops when irrigated. This district contains very little large timber.
The vegetation is mostly sage, oak brush and grass. Elevation, 8,500 feet.
Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Located three miles from a railroad. Value,
$3.50 to $8 per acre. Distance from railroad, five miles.

Township 51 N., R. 7 W. This is a hilly, mesa country. The mesas and
valleys have good soil, capable of cultivation if irrigated. There is no large
timber, the vegetation consists of cedar, sage and oak brush and grass. Lo-
cated seven miles from a railroad. Elevation, 7,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 15
to 20 inches. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 47 N., R. 8 W. This is principally a mountainous district, cov-
ered with scattering cedar and pinon timber. There is thin but good grass on
the mountains. There are good farm lands in the valley of the Uncompahgre
river in the eastern portion, where the river crosses the township. This dis-
trict is well watered by small streams in addition to the river. Iron ore is
found in different portions of this township. Elevation, 6,500 to 8,500 feet.
Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Value, $3.50 to $8 per acre. Crossed by a
railroad.

Township 48 N., R. 8 W. This township consists principally of rough and
broken land. There are some good flats which would be very productive if
irrigated, but water is very scarce. Elevation, 6,000 to 8,000 feet. Annual
rainfall, 15 inches. Located two miles from a railroad. Value, $4 to $8
per acre.

Township 49 N., R. 8 W. This township lies at the western portal of the
Gunnison tunnel of the United States reclamation service. The character of
the township is generally mountainous. The mountains are covered with a
thick growth of pinon and cedar timber, with a heavy underbrush. Good grass



MONTROSE COUNTY 233



is to be found in the valleys. Elevation, 6,000 to 8,000 feet. Annual rainfall,
10 to 15 inches. Value, $4 to $8 per acre. This district is crossed by a railroad.

Township 50 N., R. 8 W. This is a mountainous, rocky township crossed
by the Black canon of the Gunnison river. It is covered with heavy pinon
timber and a dense underbrush. Elevation, 6,500 to 8,000 feet. Annual rain-
fall, 10 to 15 inches. Value, $4 to $5 per acre. Distance from a railroad,
four miles.

Township 51 N., R. 8 W. This is an exceedingly rough and mountainous
township throughout. It is located on the northern slope of a high mesa.
There is no surface water in this district. There is some verv good soil, but
water would have to be supplied to make it productive. Dwarf cedar and sage
brush are found throughout this section. Elevation, 7,000 feet. Annual rain-
fall, 10 to 15 inches. Located six miles from a railroad. Value, $4 to $8
per acre.

Township 47 N., R. 9 W. This township is wholly mountainous and box
canons have made it rough and broken. No running water is to be found
here. Most of the timber has been cut off. The Uncompaghre river and rail-
road crosses the northeastern corner. Elevation, 6,000 to 8,000 feet. Annual
rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 48 N., R. 9 W. The surface of this township is rough and moun-
tainous. It is covered with a dense undergrowth of sage and oak brush. The
Uncompaghre river and railroad cross it diagonally. Elevation, 6,500 feet.
Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value, $4 to $8 per acre.

Township 49 N., R. 9 W. Montrose, the county seat, and the location of
the United States land office, is situated in the southwestern corner of this
township, which is crossed by two railroad lines. This district contains quite
a variety of land from level plains and irrigated valleys to mountains. There
is fine soil in the bottom lands and on the mesas, which are covered with a
scant growth of bunch grass. On the mountains the soil is adobe and barren
of timber. Elevation, 6,000 feet. Annual rainfall, under 10 inches. Value,
$5 to $10 per acre.

Township 50 N., R. 9 W. The western portion consists of flats, which are
irrigated from the Gunnison tunnel project. The eastern side rises to the
crest of the divide between the Gunnison and Uncompaghre rivers. Some good
timber and grazing land occurs on the hills and on the slopes. Elevation,
6,000 to 7,000 feet. Annual rainfall, under 10 inches. Located four miles from
a railroad. Value, $4 to $8 per acre.

Township 51 N., R. 9 W. In the western portion there are two long val-
leys with a number of smaller tributaries, all good soil and watered from the
Gunnison tunnel project. Originally this land was almost barren excepting
for scattering sage brush and occasionally light grass in the valleys, but water
has turned it into a garden spot. The mountains bordering on the divide be-
tween the Gunnison and Uncompaghre rivers are covered with a heavy growth
of cedar timber. Elevation, 6,000 to 7,000 feet. Annual rainfall, under 10
inches. Value, $4 to $8 per acre for the lands above the canals.

Township 47 N., R. 10 W. This township consists of a high mesa on the
northern slope of the Horse Fly mountain, 2,000 feet above the river valley.
It is very much cut up by deep draws and canons, especially on the southern
and western sides and has but very little permanent water, but furnishes a
good range for cattle. In the southern portion there is some excellent pine
timber, which is in the Uncompaghre national forest. There is also a large
amount of cedar and pinon timber. Elevation, 7,000 feet. Annual rainfall,



234 MONTROSE COUNTY



15 to 20 inches. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre. Located five miles from a
railroad.

Township 48 N., R. 10 W. This township consists of high mesa land,
where there is good grazing and remarkably fertile soil. In the northeastern
portion, near Montrose, this land is under irrigation and very valuable. An-
nual rainfall, 15 inches. Elevation, 6,000 to 7,000 feet. Value, $5 to $10 per
acre. Located one mile from a railroad.

Township 49 N., R. 10 W. This township is principally fine mesa land,
mostly under irrigation and very productive. A railroad crosses this section
and Montrose, the county seat, is only two miles distant. Elevation, 6,000
feet. Annual rainfall, 10 inches. Value, $10 to $12 per acre.

Township 47 N., R. 11 W. This township lies on top of the northern slope
of the Uncompaghre plateau. The surface is broken by deep canons and moun-
tain ranges. Nearly all of this district is suitable for grazing only. There is
a dense growth of scrubby spruce, aspen and oak brush in many parts. Eleva-
tion, 8,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 20 to 25 inches. Located ten miles from a
railroad. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 48 N., R. 11 W. A rocky and mountainous township with a
broken, rolling surface. This district is cut by creeks, canons and gulches,
which are nearly all dry. There is a dense growth of pinon, cedar and scrub
oak. Elevation, 6,500 to 8,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Located
six miles from a railroad. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 49 N., R. 11 W. This township is rough and broken by canons
and gulches. The timber consists of heavy pinon and cedar, with a dense
undergrowth. The water is poor. Elevation, 6,000 to 7,000 feet. Annual
rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value, $4 to $8 per acre. Located four miles from
a railroad.

Township 50 N., R. 11 W. This district consists of rolling mesa land cut
up by narrow canons principally on the west side. The eastern part of the
township is under a canal. Pinons and cedars are plentiful in some portions.
Elevation, 5,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 inches and less. Value, $4 to $8
per acre. Located four miles from a railroad.

Township 48 N., R. 12 W. This is a mountainous township. The whole
western portion is included in the Uncompaghre national forest. The surface
is generally rough and rocky; broken by creeks and canons. There is a heavy
growth of aspen and spruce timber with a dense growth of scrub oak brush
and aspen. Located ten miles from a railroad. Elevation, 8,000 feet. Annual
rainfall, 20 to 25 inches. Value, $3.50 $5 per acre.

Township 49 N., R. 12 W. This is a rough and rocky township, mostly in-
cluded in the Uncompaghre national forest. The surface is broken by numer-
ous creeks and canons. It is heavily wooded with pinon and cedar, with a
dense undergrowth. Elevation, 7,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches.
Located ten miles from a railroad. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 50 N., R. 12 E. This is an extremely rough, broken country, cut
by canons and gulches, which are mostly dry. It is heavily wooded and cov-
ered with a dense undergrowth of pinon, cedar and some scattering cotton-
wood trees along the creek bottoms. Elevation, 6,000 feet. Annual rainfall,
10 to 15 inches. Located ten miles from a railroad. Value, $4 to $8 per acre.

Township 51 N., R. 12 W. This township is broken by canons and creeks,
which are mostly dry. It is heavily wooded and has a dense undergrowth of



MONTROSE COUNTY 286



pinon and sage brush, also considerable cactus. Elevation, 6,500 feet.
rainfall, less than 10 inches. Located three miles from a railroad. Value, $4
to $8 per acre.

Township 46 N., R. 13 W. This township is very rough and mountainous
The only lands classified as good agricultural lands consist of about eighty
acres each in sections 6 and 11. The deep rocky canons occupy a large part of
the territory. The township is well covered with cedar, pinon and oak brush.
Elevation, 6,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Value, $3.50 to $5
per acre. Located eighteen miles from a railroad.

Township 49 N., R. 13 W. Rough uplands, intersected by numerous
canons and gulches. The southern portion is covered with spruce, pine and
aspen, and is included in the Uncompahgre national forest. The northern
portion is covered with pinon, cedar, and a dense undergrowth of scrub oak
and other brush. This township is well watered by small springs and creeks.
The land is more fit for grazing than agriculture. Elevation, 7,000 to 8,000
feet. Annual rainfall, 20 inches. Located fifteen miles from a railroad.
Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 50 N., R. 13 W. The surface of this township is rough uplands,
intersected by numerous canons and covered with cedar, pinon, scrub oak and
sage brush. Water is scarce. This land is only fit for pasturage. Elevation,
6,000 to 7,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Located ten miles from
a railroad. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 51 N., R. 13 W. This township is composed of rough uplands,
with the exception of the valley of the Escalante river, where the soil is sandy
loam. There is plenty of water for irrigation. The balance of the township
is only suited for pasturage. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre. Elevation, 5,500
feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Located five miles from a railroad.

Township 46 N., R. 14 W. This is a very rough, mountainous township on
the western slope of the Uncompaghre plateau. It is covered with a heavy
growth of pinon timber. The agricultural lands are in the San Miguel canon.
Elevation, 6,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 20 inches. Located eighteen miles from
a railroad. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 47 N., R. 14 W. The entire township is mountainous and much
cut up by deep canons. There are no agricultural lands to be found here.
The surface is generally covered with cedar, pinon and scrub oak. Located
twenty-five miles from a railroad. Elevation, 7,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 20
to 25 inches. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 46 N., R. 15 W. In general, the surface is mostly mountainous
and rocky, although there are some good lands in sections 7, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 17
and 18. More than three-fourths of the township is covered with heavy tim-
ber. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Elevation, 6,000 feet. Located twenty
five miles from a railroad. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 47 N., R. 15 W. This is an exceedingly rugged and mountain-
ous township. It is practically arid. There is a heavy growth of pinon and
cedars covering nearly the entire township, with some pine timber in spots.
Elevation, 6,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Located thirty miles
from a railroad. Value, $3.50 to $8 per acre.

Township 48 N., R. 15 W. A very rough and mountainous township. The
southern half is covered with dense underbrush and scattering growth 01 heavy
yellow pine timber. The northern and western portions are well watered by
numerous springs. The abundance of water, together with a good growth of



286 MONTROSE COUNTY



grass, makes excellent grazing. Located thirty-five miles from a railroad.
Elevation, 6,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 16 to 20 inche*. Value, $3.60 to $6
per acre.

Township 46 N., R. 16 W. Some good grazing lands and some irrigated
lands are to be found in the canon of San Miguel. In general, the surface of
the township is rough and rocky with scattering timber, principally heavy
pinon. Elevation, 6,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 ot 20 inches. Located thirty
miles from a railroad. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 47 N., R. 16 W. This is an extremely rough and mountainous
section. The greater portion is covered with pinon timber. There are some
clumps of cottonwoods along the San Miguel river. No farming land is to be
found here. Some of the land is utilized for grazing. There are several min-
eral claims throughout this district. Elevation, 5,500 feet. Annual rainfall,
15 to 20 inches. Located thirty-five miles from a railroad. Value, $3.50 to $5
per acre.

Township 48 N., R. 16 W. The surface is rough and broken by deep
canons. There are no farming lands here. Pinon timber abounds in this
township, except in the two northern tiers, which have a dense growth of
scrub oak and aspen. Located thirty miles from a railroad. Elevation, 6,000
feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 49 N., R. 16 W. This township is very rough and broken
throughout. It is covered with scrub oak and some good yellow pine timber.
The grass is good and there is an abundance of water, making this a good
grazing country. Located thirty miles from a railroad. Elevation, 6,000 feet.
Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 46 N., R. 17 W. The upper end of the Paradox valley in this
township contains excellent feed for cattle. The rest of the township is
mountainous with low cedar and pinon trees. The only water found in this
district is in section 24. Located thirty-six miles from a railroad. Elevation.
6,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Value, $5 per acre.

Township 47 N., R. 17 W. This is a high, mountainous region. The land
is mostly worthless. Some placer mining for gold is being carried on. Some
good pine timber. Elevation, 6,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 4 to 10 inches. Lo-
cated thirty-five miles from a railroad. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 48 N., R. 17 W. The surface of this township is very moun-
tainous. Much of it is broken by deep, inaccessible canons. It contains some
grazing land in the eastern portion, known as Pierson's range. Elevation,
6,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 inches. Located thirty-six miles from a rail-
road. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 46 N., R. 18 W. This township is very rough and badly cut up
by ravines and canons, which are impassable in many places. The soil in
general is of little value. There is some fair timber in the southern part, it
is mostly scattering. Located forty-five miles from a railroad. Elevation,
6,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value, $3.50 per acre.

Township 47 N., R. 18 W. The surface is mostly mountainous and cut
by many canons. The river bottoms along the Dolores river contains good
soil and in the northwestern portion the land is rolling and the soil first
quality. The timber is mostly pinon and cedar with some heavy pine. Locat-
ed forty miles from a railroad. Elevation, 6,000 feet. Value, $3.50 to $5
per acre,



MONTROSE COUNTY 237



Township 48 N., R. 18 W. The eastern portion is badly cut up by the
Dolores canon. There is fine white, red and brown sandstone found in the
western portion and some heavy pine timber in the northwestern part. There
is a scattering growth of pinon and cedar on the mountain sides and some
spruce in the canons. Elevation, 5,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches.
Located thirty-five miles from a railroad. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 46 N., R. 19 W. The land is rolling and broken, but affords
excellent grazing. There is a scattering growth of cedars and pinons. Water
can be had in limited quantities from the gullies and ravines. This township
is crossed by the Dolores river. Elevation, 5,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to
15 inches. Located fifty miles from a railroad. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 47 N., R. 19 W. This is a good grazing country. The agricul-
tural lands are in the northeastern portion. Water can be obtained from the
streams in limited quantities. There is some scattering pine and pinon tim-
ber on the mesas. Located forty miles from a railroad. Annual rainfall, 10
to 15 inches. Elevation, 5,500 feet. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 48 N., R. 19 W. The northern portion is rolling mesa land.
There is a scattering growth of pine timber and some good bunch grass, mak-
ing this a fine grazing district. The remainder is fine farming and grazing
land. There is an abundance of water. This township is located north of the
Paradox valley. Elevation, 5,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches.
Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre. Forty miles from a railroad.

Township 47 N., R. 20 W. -The soil along La Sal creek is very fertile and
the valley is occupied for its entire length by settlers. In other parts the soil
in this township is good, but too rocky for cultivation. There are several
uranium prospects in this district. On the hills there is a heavy growth of
cedar and pinons, with a scattering growth of pines. Elevation, 7,000 feet.
Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre. Distance from
railroad, forty miles.

For township 45 N., ranges 9 to 20 W. see San Miguel county.



MORGAN COUNTY

STERLING LAND DISTRICT Area Vacant Lands, 52,135 Acres.
DENVER LAND DISTRICT Area Vacant Lands, 27,540 Acres.

Morgan county is located in northeastern Colorado. It is thirty-six
miles square. It is crossed east and west by the South Platte river. A por-
tion of the county is valley land under irrigation and in a high state of culti-
vation.

Fort Morgan is the county seat, and is a prosperous town of about 3,000.
The next town of importance is Brush, with a population of 1,000. The pop-
ulation of the entire county is 10,000.

Morgan county has good railroad facilities; has sugar beet factories
and is an industrious district.

The approximate value per year of the agricultural products is as follows:

Wheat and other grains $350,000.00

Hay and forage crops 400,000.00

Vegetables 100,000.00

Sugar beets 500,000.00

STERLING LAND DISTRICT.

Township 1 N., R. 55 W. The surface of this township is rolling prairie.
Beaver creek runs across it, along which there are a few scattered cottonwoods.
The soil is a sandy loam covered with a good growth of buffalo grass. This



Online LibraryGeorge S. (George Samuel) ClasonFree homestead lands of Colorado described; a handbook for settlers → online text (page 28 of 39)