George S. (George Samuel) Clason.

Free homestead lands of Colorado described; a handbook for settlers online

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means a succession of low hills suitable for cultivation. Rough
and broken prairie lands mean unsuitable for cultivation.

The word "hilly" is used to describe a decidedly undulating
or rolling section. Lands described as hilly are not necessarily
unsuitable for cultivation.

The word, mountainous, is used to describe lands steep and
rugged in character, the slopes of which are not suitable for cul-
tivation.

A valley is open, level bottom land along streams and it may
be of any size.

The word "park" signifies a comparatively level piece of
ground located in the mountains. A park is not a valley, as it
may be high upon a mountain side or on top of the divide; it
may be a large district including numerous valleys and low roll-
ing hills or prairie lands between.

A mesa is a flat- topped hill, a formation frequently called
"table mountains." Mesas may be of any size, large or small,
and of any height, but the general characteristics must be flat-
topped with precipitous sides. Plateau table lands differ from
mesas in that they do not have the precipitous sides.



OF COLORADO DESCRIBED 41

An arroyo is a gulch or gulley , usually cut out by erosion ;
having very steep sides and being a formation that accompanies
mesas.

WATER.

Considerable emphasis is laid in the descriptions with
regard to surface water. This is important for two reasons. If
there is a considerable amount of surface water it usually indi-
cates that there will be some lands in the immediate vicinity that
could be irrigated. Surface water is also important in the stock
industry, especially running water and springs that give a
permanent supply the year round.

Water in this State in running streams or wells is almost
universally pure and good.

In the mountainous sections are many mineral springs.
These most commonly contain sulphur, iron and other harmless
minerals. A good many of Colorado's mountain springs, espe-
cially the hot springs, are radio-active. Eminent physicians are
now studying the affects of these to see what curative properties
they may have. At some later time these undoubedly will be
valued highly.

In the prairie sections, well water can be obtained at varying
depths; in some places over large areas at just a few feet under
the surface. It generally can be found within 75 or 100 feet,
but occasionally it will be 200 or 300 feet in depth. In the de-
scriptions, the depth of water for wells is frequently given.

In some of the shallow watered districts, for example, North-
eastern Weld county, irrigation farming is carried on by raising
the water from shallow wells by means of gasoline pumps. There
is a possibility for wide development along these lines.

There are several artesian belts in the State. The best
known are in central Baca county, and in the San Luis valley,
where water can be tapped at a comparatively shallow depth and
spouts under considerable pressure.



ADAMS COUNTY

DENVER LAND DISTRICT Area of Vacant Lands, 99,680 Acres.

Adams county is located in the central part of the State, just northeast
of the city of Denver. It is all in a plain section. The western end is crossed
by the South Platte river. Large areas of this county are irrigated and very
productive. The eastern portion of the county is a dry farming and stock
raising section.

In the last few years land has been very rapidly taken up in this county,
and at the present time there is not a large area available for settlement.
The population of the county is 9,000.

The annual production of the principal agricultural products, is as fol-
lows:

Cereals . $700,000.00

Hay 400,000.00

Vegetables 200,000.00

Other crops 150,000.00

The central portion of Adams county is underlaid with coal. This is not
being mined commercially; probably lies quite deep.

While there is not much vacant land in the county, there is a large
amount of land that has been taken up for a good many years and used as
pasturage, which can be bought at a very nominal price and is suitable for
cultivation.

Adams county, has good railroad facilities; is right at the door of Den-
ver's market, and is a good location for farming, dairying or stock raising.
Brighton is the county seat; population 1,000.

Township 1 S., R. 57 W. The surface is generally rolling prairie land
with some bottom land along Badger creek. In the bottom land, the soil is
of good quality; other portions, sand loam. There is no surface water ex-
cepting along the creek. Good natural grass. Value, $11 to $15 per acre. An-
nual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation 5,000 feet; sixteen miles from rail-
road.

Township 2 S., R. 57 W. The surface is generally rolling prairie; with a
good growth of buffalo grass. The soil varies from a clay loam to a sandy
loam. Suitable for cultivation. Value, $10 to $15 per acre. Annual rainfall,
10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 5,000 feet. Fifteen miles from railroad.

Township 3 S., R. 57 W. The surface of this township is rolling and
badly broken in places. This is fair grazing land, but no surface water.
Value, $5 to $8 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 5,000
feet. Fifteen miles from railroad.

Township 1 S., R. 58 W. The surface is rolling prairie, rough in places
and covered with a good growth of natural grasses. The northern part is
sandy, the southern part, hilly and rocky. Value, $5 to $15 per acre. There
is no surface water. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 5,000 feet.
Fifteen miles from railroad.

Township 2 S., R. 58 W. The surface is rolling prairie, rough and broken
in some places. There is a good growth of buffalo grass. Destitute of wood



ADAMS COUNTY 4iB



or water. There are some rolling sand hills. Value, $5 to $10 per acre. An-
nual railfall, 10 to 16 inches. Elevation, 5,200 fet. Twenty nutei from rail-
road.

Township 1 S., R. 59 W. The surface is generally rolling prairie land.
There is abundance of good grazing. The soil is a sandy loam. There is no
surface water excepting in Deer Trail creek. There is farming in this town-
ship. Value, $6 to $15 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation,
5,000 feet. Fifteen miles from railroad.

Township 2 S., R. 59 W. The surface is rolling prairie land. The soil is a
sandy loam. There is farming in this township. No surface water. Value,
$6 to $12 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 5,000 feet.
Ten miles from railroad.

Township 3 S., R. 60 W. The surface is rolling prairie land. Soil, a
sandy loam. There is good growth of grass. There is no surface water ex-
cepting in Bijou creek. This is in the dry farming district. Value, $7 to $12
per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 5,000 feet. Three
miles from railroad.

Township 2 S., R. 61 W. The surface is rolling prairie land, nearly level
in places. The soil is sandy. This is fair grazing land. Water in ravines
and pools. Value, $5 to $12 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Eie-
vation, 5,000 feet. Eight miles from railroad.



ALAMOSA COUNTY

DEL NORTE LAND DISTRICT Area of Vacant Lands, 43,748 Acres.
PUEBLO LAND DISTRICT Area of Vacant Lands, 12,274 Acres.

Alamosa county is located in the south-central portion of Colorado, in
the heart of the San Luis valley, with the exception of the northeast corner,
which crosses the Sangre de Cristo Range of mountains. The rest of the
county is flat and level, lying in a splendid agricultural district.

The fertility of the soil of this valley is unusual and while the altitude
of the valley is comparatively high for farming, being 8,000 feet, yet the
fact that it is so far south and sheltered by the surrounding mountain
ranges, make it a very good farming section.

The yields of wheat, potatoes, alfalfa, field peas and other crops suitable
to this valley, are tremendous and not excelled anywhere in the world.

Alamosa county has good railroad facilities. A large part of the county
is under irrigation. Alamosa, the county seat, is the largest town, with a
population of 3,000 people.

This county lies in the artesian belt and has many flowing artesian wells.

DEL NORTE LAND DISTRICT.

Township 38 N., R. 10 E. In the center of the San Luis valley, just one
mile north of Alamosa, the county seat. This township is crossed by rail-
road. The land is comparatively level and is covered with chico brush and
grease wood and sage brush. The soil is a fairly, rich, sandy soil and pro-
duces fine alfalfa. Some artesian water secured at a depth of from 150 to
400 feet. Value, $20 per acre. Annual rainfall, 5 to 10 inches. Elevation,
8,000 feet.

Township 36 N., R. 11 E. The vacant lands in this township are mesa
lands, rather above the valley level and not up to the standard of the bot-
tom lands. The soil is covered with sage brush. Value, $5 per acre. Dis-
tance from railroad, four miles. Annual rainfall, 10 inches. Elevation, 8,000
feet.

Township 37 N., R. 11 E. This township is in the center of the San Luis
valley. The surface is comparatively level and covered with sage brush.
Fairly good sandy soil underlaid with artesian water at a depth of 150 to
400 feet. Value, $5 per acre. This township is crossed by railroad. Annual
rainfall, 10 inches. Elevation, 8,000 feet.

Township 38 N., R. 11 E. A level, sage brush covered section without
surface water. Fairly good grass growing among the sage brush. The
soil is sandy and good underlaid with artesian water at a depth of 150 to 400
feet. A considerable area of this township is already under irrigation.
Value, $5 to $15 per acre. Distance from railroad, two miles. Annual rain-
fall, 10 inches. Elevation, 8,000 feet.

Township 39 N., R. 11 E. This is a rolling sage brush country. Water
is found a short distance below the surface. The township is partially in
the sand hills. The soil is a good sandy soil and raising exceptionally good



ALAMOSA COUNTT 45



alfalfa. Distance from railroad, two miles. Value, $6 to $10 per acre. An-
mual rainfall, 10 ineheg. Elevation, 8,000 feet.

Township 40 N., R. 11 E. The vacant lands in this township are just
outside of the irrigated portion of the valley. The surface is comparatively
level. There is considerable alkali on part of the land. The soil produces
a good growth of alfalfa; and is underlaid with artesian water at a depth
of 150 to 400 feet. Value, $8 to $10 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 inches.
Elevation, 8,000 feet. Distance from railroad, three miles.

Township 37 N., R. 12 E. This township is located in the eastern portion
of the valley; it is crossed centrally by a railroad. The surface is level,
covered with sage brush and greasewood. A good sandy soil, underlaid with
artesian water at a depth of 150 to 400 feet. Value, $5 to $10 per acre. An-
nual rainfall, 10 inches. Elevation, 8,000 feet.

Township 37 N., R. 12 E. This township is located in the eastern portion
of the valley. It has a good sandy soil, well covered with chico and sage brush;
underlaid with artesian water at a depth of 150 to 400 feet. Distance from
railroad, two miles. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 8,000 feet.
Value, $5 to $10 per acre.

Township 40 N., R. 12 E. The eastern portion of this township is hilly and
sandy covered with sage brush. The western portion is level, fine grazing land.
Some artesian water at a depth of from 150 to 400 feet. Some surface water
at a shallow depth. Value, $5 to $10 per acre. Annual railfall, 10 to 15
inches. Elevation, 8,000 feet.

Township 39 N., R. 13 E. A fractional township only about a half mile
wide by six miles north and south. The soil is generally sandy and is cov-
ered with sage brush. Value, $5 per acre. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches.
Elevation, 8,500 feet. Distance from railroad, fifteen miles.

PUEBLO LAND DISTRICT.

Township 27 S., R. 73 W. A rough and mountainous township on the
western slope of the Sangre De Cristo range. The soil is generally sandy and
rocky. This is fair grazing land. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre. Distance
from railroad, fifteen miles. Elevation, 9,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to
20 inches.

Township 28 S., R. 73 W. The surface of this township is mountainous,
reaching to the crest of Sierra Blanca, the highest mountain in southern
Colorado, and sloping westward. The eastern portion is mostly above timber
land. The western portion is well timbered with spruce and pinon, and some
cottonwood. This township is well watered by streams and creeks and the
land is suitable for grazing. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre. Distance from
railroad, fifteen miles. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Elevation, 9,000
feet.

Township 29 S., R. 73 W. Outside of the regular bottom lands, the soil
in this township is sandy, covered with sage brush. This township is in the
extreme eastern portion of the San Luis valley, just under Mt. Sierra
Blanco. The elevation is so high that frost occurs almost at any time during
the year, making agriculture hazardous. Mostly grazing land. Value, $3.50
to $5 per acre. Distance from railroad, three miles. Elevation, 8,500 feet.
Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches.



ARAPAHOE COUNTY

DENVER LAND DISTRICT Area of Vacant Lands, 4,040 Acres.

Arapahoe county is in the central part of the State, adjoining Denver.
In the western end of the county, around Littleton, the county seat, there
is considerable irrigated land. The rest of the country is used for dry farm-
ing and stock raising.

The vacant lands have recently been taken up very rapidly in this county.
There is very little left at the present time. There are, however, large areas
suitable for cultivation, which are used for pasturing or not used at all, that
can be purchased at a very nominal price.

Its closeness to Denver, and the good market facilities, makes this an
especially desirable section in which to locate. The population of the county
is 12,000. The population of Littleton is 1,500.

The value per year, for the principal agricultural products, is as follows:

Cereals $250,000.00

Hay 400,000.00

Vegetables and other crops 125,000.00

Township 4 S., R. 57 W. Most of the surface of this township is badly
broken up with deep ravines and rough hills. The soil is of poor quality.
There is a good growth of grass. Water can be found in pools in several
ravines. The southern portion is a little better, rolling prairies. Value, $5
to $8 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 5,200 feet.
Fifteen miles from railroad.

Township 5 S., R. 57 W. The surface is broken by large ravines; very
difficult to cross. The soil is generally third rate. This land is good only
for grazing purposes. There is no surface or running water. Value, $3.50
to $6.00 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 5,300 feet.
Ten miles from railroad.

Township 4 S., R. 58 W. The surface is broken up by ravine? running
in all directions. Some portions are suitable for farming, some rolling hills.
There is no surface water. Value, $5 to $10 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to
15 inches. Elevation, 5,200 feet. Eight miles from the railroad.

Township 5 S., R. 58 W. The surface is broken with gullies and ravines-
Some portions of this township are nice level land; others hilly; some valleys-
The soil is adobe. Grazing only medium. Value, $5 to $8 per acre. Annual
rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 5,300 feet. Five miles from railroad.

Township 5 S., R. 59 W. The surface is generally rolling. The soil is
adobe. Grazing, medium. There is considerable farming in this township;
also indications of coal and iron. Value, $5 to $10 per acre. Annual rainfall,
10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 5,100 feet. This township is crossed by a rail"
road,



ARCHULETA COUNTY

DURANGO LAND DISTRICT Area of Vacant Lands, 114,789 Acres.

Archuleta county lies on the extreme southern boundary of Colorado,
adjoining the New Mexico state line. It is located on the southern slope of
the San Juan mountains and is largely included in the San Juan national
forest.

This is a fertile, well-watered section, originally very heavily timbered,
although much of the timber has been cut off. Archuleta county is very
sparsely settled, the total population of the county being only 3,500 people.
There are good farming lands in this county. Much of the vacant land offers
excellent opportunities for homesteaders, both in taking up new land and
in farming the logged off lands.

This is quite a productive stock country, but up to the present time the
agricultural output is very small, about as follows:

Cereals $ 75,000.00

Hay 125,000.00

Vegetables and other crops 25,000.00

Pagosa Springs, population 1,000, is the county seat and the location of
some large medicinal hot springs that some day will have a national reputation
for their wonderful curative properties.

Township 32 N., R. 1 E. The surface of this township is very moun-
tainous, with deep canyons along the state line. Grazing is good along the
river and in the valleys. This section was originally heavily timbered, but
most of it has been cut. There are some large open parks, where feed is
good and abundant. This township is crossed by a logging railroad. Value,
$3.50 per acre. Annual rainfall, 20 to 25 inches. Elevation, 8,000 feet.

Township 32 N., R. 2 E. This township is generally rough and moun-
tainous, much sage brush and valleys where the grazing is good. There are
some good lands along the river bottoms, with the exception of a strip a
mile wide. The rest of the township is included in the Tierra Amarilla
grant, a grant made by the king of Spain to one of his favorites, when this
section still belonged to Spain. This township is reached by a logging rail-
road from the main line. This section of Colorado was originally heavily
timbered. Much of the timber has been cut. Annual rainfall, 20 to 25
inches. Elevation, 8,000 feet.

Township 33 N., R. 2 E. This township is mountainous and well watered.
There is some fertile bench land along the river bottom. All of the town-
ship except a strip one mile deep in the southern boundary of the township,
is included in the San Juan national forest. A logging railroad runs within
one mile of the southeastern corner. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre. Annual
rainfall, 20 to 25 inches. Elevation, 8,500 feet.

Township 32 N., R. 1 W. This township is generally mountainous. A
portion of it is fairly level and fine for grazing purposes. There is more
or less pine timber. This township is crossed by a logging railroad. Value,
$7 per acre. Annual rainfall, 20 to 25 inches. Elevation, 8,000 feet.



48 ARCHULETA COUNTY



Township 35 N., R. 1 W. This township is just east and adjoining
Pagosa Springs, the county seat. The east one-half of the township is in-
cluded in the San Juan national forest. The district is hilly. It is well
watered by several streams, which have some good land along their bottoms.
Good grazing. Originally this section was covered with heavy mill timber,
most of which has been cut, as the lumbermen were not very particular as
to whose timber they cut. It is probable that the good timber has been
stolen from the few tracts of land still vacant in this township. When the
stumps are cleared off the lands make excellent farms. Value, $5 to $8 per
acre. Annual rainfall, 20 to 25 inches. Elevation, 7,500 feet. Distance from
railroad, one mile.

Township 36 N., R. 1 W. This township is mountainous and with the
exception of sections 31 and 32, is included in the San Juan national forest.
This district is well watered and was originally covered with heavy timber,
most of which has been cut off. Value, $5 to $10 per acre. Annual rainfall, 20
to 25 inches. Elevation, 7,500 feet. Three miles from railroad.

Township 32 N., R. iy 2 W. This township is a narrow strip of land
about one-half mile in width by four miles north and south. In general it
is mountainous. Valuable yellow pine and Douglass fir timber may be found
in portions. There is plenty of surface water for stock. Excellent grazing
throughout. The soil is a thin black or sandy loam with many rocks and
stones and is fairly moist. This land would not be considered as agricul-
tural land at present, but is of value for its timber and grazing. Distance
from railroad, six miles. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Elevation, 8,500
feet. Value, $5 to $8 per acre.

Township 36 N., R. iy 2 W. This is a narrow strip of ground about one-
half mile wide by six miles north and south. It is mountainous and the soil
unfit for agricultural purposes. The only creek crossing it is alkaline and
unfit for domestic use. There is some good timber in section 36 and the rest
is covered with scrub oak and other brush. Distance from railroad, seven
miles. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre. Annual rainfall, 20 to 25 inches. Eleva-
tion, 7,500 feet.

Township 32 N., R. 2 W. This township is entirely mountainous, rough
and broken, more or less covered with scrub pine, spruce, cedar and pinon.
A few small springs are to be found in some of the canyons. There is a
little farming land. Value, $3.50 to $7 per acre. Crossed by railroad. Eleva-
tion, 7,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches.

Township 33 N., R. 2 W. This township is hilly and high mesa land
There is very little land suitable for agriculture, excepting that along the
river bottoms. This township was originally covered with good pine and
cedar timber. Excellent grazing throughout. Distance from railroad, three
miles. Value $5 to $8 per acre. Annual rainfall, 20 inches. Elevation, 7,000
feet.

Township 34 N., R. 2 W. This township is mountainous and nearly all
included in the San Juan national forest. The lands outside of the forest
are all taken up with the exception of a few pieces, ranging from 40 to 360
acres in size. It is probable that the best timber has been cut from these
and that they would be classified as logged off lands with a value of $5 to
$8 per acre. Annual rainfall, 20 inches. Elevation, 7,000 feet.

Township 35 N., R. 2 W. In the eastern part of this township is located
Pagosa Springs, the county seat of Archuleta county. There is considerable
farming being done without irrigation in this district around Pagosa Springs,



ARCHULETA COUNTY 49



utilizing the logged-off lands. Some portions of this township are rough
and unsuitable for cultivation; others fairly level. Value, $6 to $12 per acre.
This township is crossed by railroad. Annual rainfall, 20 to 25 inches. Eleva-
tion, 7,500 feet.

Township 32 N., R. 3 W. This is a fractional township on the extreme
southern border of Colorado, adjoining the New Mexico state line. The
southern tier of sections are mountainous and covered with a dense growth
of pine, pinon and cedars, with excellent grass. The rest of the township is
a rolling mesa. The lands along the river bottoms are good. Value, $5 to
$8 per acre. This township is crossed by railroad. Annual rainfall, 15 to
20 inches. Elevation, 6,500 feet.

Township 33 N., R. 3 W. This township is mainly adapted to grazing.
There is good agricultural land along Cat creek. Water and grass is abund-
ant. There is a heavy growth of pine timber in the northwest portion.
Value, $5 to $8 per acre. This township is crossed by railroad. Elevation,
6,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches.

Township 34 N., R. 3 W. The soil in this township is considerably below
the average for this district. The surface is mountainous in the western
portion and rough and broken in the eastern part. The timber is mostly
pine with a dense growth of brush in most parts. The soil is adobe. Value,
$5 to $10 per acre. Crossed by railroad. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches.
Elevation, 8,000 feet.

Township 32 N., R. 4 W. The river valley is from one-quarter to a
mile wide and is good agricultural land; the balance of this township is
high rolling mesa, covered with pine, pinon and cedar. There is an abund-
ance of good gramma grass. This township is crossed by railroad. Value,
$5 per acre. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Elevation, 6,500 feet.

Township 33 N., R. 4 W. The surface is hilly and mountainous with pine
timber on the ridges, and cedar and pinon over the rest. The only water
consists of small springs along El Rondo creek and a very large flowing
spring in a small valley in the northeast quarter of section 9. This township
is chiefly valuable for timber and grazing purposes. Value, $5 to $8 per
acre. Distance from railroad, two miles. Elevation, 8,000 feet. Annual
rainfall, 15 to 20 inches.

Township 32 N., R. 5 W. The agricultural lands in this township are
confined to the river valleys, the remainder being mostly mountainous and
covered with heavy pine timber. This township is crossed by railroad.
Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation,



Online LibraryGeorge S. (George Samuel) ClasonFree homestead lands of Colorado described; a handbook for settlers → online text (page 4 of 39)