George S. (George Samuel) Clason.

Free homestead lands of Colorado described; a handbook for settlers online

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is nearly level prairie. The soil is well adapted in this township to dry
farming. Excellent grains are raised in the river bottoms under natural con-
ditions. Water is found close to the surface anywhere in the basin of the
Big Sandy creek. Value, $6 to $12 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches.
Elevation, 4,500 feet.



74 CHEYENNE COUNTY



LAMAR LAND DISTRICT.

Township 16 S., R. 42 W. The surface of this township is high, level
prairie, slightly broken in the southwestern portion, also in the northern.
There is no water in the township except as taken from wells at a depth of
from 160 to 200 feet. The soil is a dry, light, rough clay loam about twelve
inches in depth and is quite productive, when properly cultivated; it is un-
derlaid with a subsoil of stiff clay. This is naturally an excellent grazing
township. Distance from railroad, ten miles. Elevation, 4,000 feet. Annual
rainfall, 10 to 15 'inches. Value, $5 to $10 per acre.

Township 16 S., R. 43 W. The surface of this township is practically
level prairie land, although gently rolling in places. The soil is a dark clay
loam of about medium texture, with a clay subsoil. A dense growth of short
buffalo grass covers the entire township, affording good grazing. Dry farm-
ing is practiced in this township with some success. Water is obtained by
boring wells 160 feet deep. Distance from railroad, eight miles. Elevation,
4,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value, $5 to $15 per acre.

Township 16 S., R. 44 W. The surface of this township is gently roll-
ing prairie land. The soil throughout being a brown clay loam, of from six
to twelve inches deep and of medium texture, with a clay subsoil. A thick
growth of buffalo grass covers the entire township. Well water of poor
quality and containing much alkali is obtained by boring wells from a depth
of 50 to 300 feet. This is a dry farming district. Distance from railroad,
eight miles. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value, $5 to $10 per acre.
Elevation, 4,000 feet.

Township 16 S., R. 45 W. The surface of this township is level and
gently rolling prairie land in the northern portion; the southern portion is
rolling with a soil of brown clay loam of from eight to fourteen inches in
depth and of medium texture with a subsoil of clay. In the northern por-
tion the soil is a sandy loam of fine texture, with a dry sandy subsoil. The
township is covered with a heavy growth of buffalo grass. Water, which is
obtained only by boring, is strongly alkaline. The land in this township is
suitable for dry farming. Value, $5 to $10 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to
15 inches. Elevation, 4,000 feet. Distance from railroad, eight miles.

Township 16 S., R. 46 W. The surface of this township is level and
gently rolling prairie land, sloping gradually to the south. The soil in the
northern portion, is a stiff clay, but is quite sandy in some places; it is of
medium texture with a clay subsoil. In the remaining portion of the town-
ship the soil is a light, sandy loam of from eight to fifteen inches deep and
of a medium texture, with a dry clay subsoil. There is a heavy growth of
buffalo grass covering the entire township. Water is obtained by boring
wells to a depth of 200 feet. Distance from railroad, eight miles. Eleva-
tion, 4,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value, $5 to $10 per
acre.

Township 16 S., R. 47 W. The surface of this township is rolling prairie
land with a number of sand hills, sloping gently south. The soil is sandy
and light in color; it is of fair texture and dry, being on a sandy subsoil.
There is a thick growth of short buffalo grass covering the entire township,
affording excellent pasturage for several hundred head of cattle. Water of
good quality, containing only a slight trace of alkali, is obtained by sink-
ing wells 10 to 150 feet. There are a few cottonwood trees along Big Sandy
creek. Distance from railroad, six miles. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches.
Elevation, 4,000 feet. Value, $5 to $10 per acre.



CHEYENNE COUNTY 75



Township 16 S., R. 48 W. The surface of this township is rolling prairie
in the northern portion, and more rolling hills in the southern part. The
soil is a light, sandy loam of fine texture, on a clay subsoil. There is a
thick growth of buffalo grass covering the entire township, affording good
grazing. A few scattering cottonwoods are found along Rush creek. Water
of a fair quality is obtained by sinking wells 60 to 200 feet. A portion of
this township is under cultivation. Distance from railroad, five miles.
Elevation, 4,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value, $5 to $10 per
acre.

Township 16 S., R. 49 W. The surface of this township is composed of
rolling prairies and low sand hills. The soil is a light, fine grained sand mixed
with clay in places, on a clay subsoil. A heavy growth of buffalo grass
mixed with scattering short sage brush covers the entire township. Water
is obtained at a depth of ten feet along Rush creek, and at a depth of 200
feet in higher portions of the township. No water in Rush creek during the
summer season. There are a few scattering cottonwoods. This is mostly a
grazing country, although some land is cultivated. Distance from railroad,
three miles. Elevation, 4,300 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value,
$4 to $8 per acre.

Township 16 S., R. 50 W. The surface of this township is rolling prairie
and low sand hills. The soil is a light, dry, fine grain sand on a clay sub-
soil. The entire township is covered with a good growth of buffalo grass
mixed with a fair quality of short sage brush. There are a few scattering
cottonwoods along the dry bottoms of Rush creek. The water is of poor
quality, containing a large amount of alkaline; it is found at a depth of
from five to ten feet, along this creek. Only a small area of the township
is under cultivation. Distance from railroad, eight miles. Elevation, 4,500
feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Value, $4 to $8 per acre.

Township 16 S., R. 51 W. The surface of this township is partially
rolling and partially level prairie land. The soil in the southern portion
consists of a light, sandy, clay loam, eight to twelve inches in depth, of a
medium texture and is on a subsoil of clay. The soil of the northern por-
tion is a light, fine grain sand. A good growth of buffalo grass and scat-
tering short sage brush covers the township. A few scattering cottonwoods
grow along Rush creek, which is a dry creek. Good water can be obtained
by sinking wells to a depth of 100 to 200 feet. Alkali water is obtained
along the creek at a depth of five to ten feet. This is chiefly a grazing
township, although dry farming is practiced with some success. Distance
from railroad, four miles. Elevation, 4,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15
inches. Value, $6 to $12 per acre.



CLEAR CREEK COUNTY

DENVER LAND DISTRICT Area of Vacant Lands, 79,811 Acres.

Clear Creek county is located on the eastern slope of the Great Continental
divide, high up among the mountains. Nearly the entire county is included
in the Pike national forest. This is not an agricultural county. There are
a few little mountain ranches and a little stock range, but no opportunities
for settlers desiring to homestead.

Clear Creek county has been famous as a producer of gold and silver for
many years. At Idaho Springs are located the famous radium hot springs,
whose water possesses great medicinal values for the treatment of rheumatism
and other diseases.

A detailed description of the vacant land in this county will be omitted,
as the open lands are either mineral lands, subject to entry only as mining
claims, or grazing lands worth from $3.50 to $5 per acre.



CONEJOS COUNTY

DEL NORTE LAND DISTRICT Area of Vacant Lands, 193,828 Acres.

Conejos county, pronounced "co-ne-us," is located along the southern
boundary of Colorado, adjoining the New Mexico state line. It is in the south-
ern end of San Luis valley and is bounded by the Rio Grande Del Norte on
the east and the Continental divide on the west.

This is a good agricultural district with a large area under irrigation.
The foothills and mountainous districts are used for grazing sheep and cattle.

Conejos, the sounty seat, has a population of 350. Antonito, the largest
town, has a population of 1,000. The total population of the county is 12,000.

The approximate value per year of the agricultural products in Conejos
county is as follows:

Grains $600,000.00

Hay 400,000.00

Vegetables 75,000.00

Township 35 N., R. 5 E. The surface of this township is very rough,
rocky and mountainous. The soil is generally 'third rate. There is a scat-
tering growth of spruce and pine timber, and a number of running streams.
The only vacant lands are best suited for grazing. Value, $3.50 per acre.
Elevation, 9,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 25 inches. Distance from railroad,
twenty-two miles.

Township 34 N., R. 6 E. The surface of this township is mountainous,
rough and broken. There are large bodies of fine pine and spruce timber and
a thick growth of aspen. The only stream is the La Jara river, which is
bordered with high, steep bluffs. Grazing land well suited for sheep and
goats, but not for cattle or horses. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre. Elevation,
9,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 20 inches. Distance from railroad, ten miles.



CONEJOS COUNTY 77



Township 35 N., R. 6 E. This entire township is rough and mountainous,
excepting the extreme western part, which is an open mesa, used for sheep
grazing. Annual rainfall, 20 inches. Elevation, 8,500 to 10,000 feet. Value,
$3.50 to $5 per acre. Distance from railroad, fifteen miles.

Township 36 N., R. 6 E. This township is mountainous and heavily tim-
bered with spruce, pine and aspen. It is all included in the Rio Grande na-
tional forest, with the exception of a narrow strip along the Alamosa river.
Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre. Annual rainfall, 15 to 20 inches. Elevation,
8,500 to 10,000 feet. Distance from railroad, fifteen miles.

Township 32 N., R. 7 E. The surface of this township is rough and
mountainous with an abundance of good timber. There are some desirable
open parks and valleys. There is good grazing over all, and especially along
the creeks. Used for sheep grazing at the present time. Annual rainfall, 15 to
20 inches. Elevation, 8,500 to 9,000 feet. This township is nearly all in-
cluded in the Rio Grande national forest. It lies on the extreme southern
boundary of Colorado, adjoining the New Mexico state line, and is touched
by railroad. Value, $3.50 per acre.

Township 33 N., R. 7 E. This is rough, mountainous land with the ex-
ception of a fertile and well watered valley, of which section 28 is the center.
This township is located in the foothills and aside from the valleys is grazing
land. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre. No stock water. Elevation, 8,500 to 9,500
feet. Annual rainfall, fifteen inches. Distance from railroad, five miles.

Township 34 N., R. 7 E. This township is crossed by the La Jara river
and is good grazing land. In most parts the soil is of fair quality. Some
scattering pine and pinon timber. Some sage brush land; also some bottom
land. Used at the present time for sheep grazing. Value, $3.50 to $5 per
acre. Elevation, 8,500 to 9,500 feet. Annual rainfall, 15 inches. Distance
from railroad, ten miles.

Township 35 N., R. 7 E. This township is located in the foothills. It is
largely rough, hilly land best suited for grazing. There is good grass through-
out. Some scattering pine and pinon. In sections 6 and 7 there are hot
springs and a hot creek flows from them. Elevation, 8,000 to 9,000 feet. An-
nual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Distance from railroad, ten miles. Value,
$3.50 to $5 per acre.

Township 36 N., R. 7 E. The eastern portion of this township is rolling
land. The soil of good quality. There is not much timber or water. The
western portion is in the foothills and is principally valuable for grazing.
Value, $3.50 to $8 per acre. Elevation, 8,000 to 9,500 feet. Annual rainfall,
ten inches. Distance from railroad, twelve miles.

Township 32 N., R. 8 E. This township is on the extreme southern bor-
der of Colorado, adjoining the New Mexico state line. It is on a high, barren
mesa; very stony with little pasture. Mexicans occupy all of the habitable
portions. This township is crossed by railroad. Annual rainfall, 8 to 12
inches. Elevation, 8,000 feet.

Township 33 N., R. 8 E. A fair portion of this township is excellent bot-
tom lands, situated along the Conejos river. In other portions there are
some good trout streams. The northwestern portion consists of high table land
with medium quality soil. A scattering growth of cottonwood, pinon and
scrub cedar. There are outcroppings of iron ore on the table land in several
places. Value, $5 to $7 per acre. Elevation, 8,000 to 9,000 feet. Annual rain-
fall, 10 inches. This district is settled principally by Mexicans. Crossed by
railroad.



78 CONEJOS COUNTY



Township 34 N., R. 8 E. The surface of this township is rolling prairie
land; alkaline in places. Poor grazing land. Value, $3.50 per acre. Eleva-
tion, 8,500 feet. Annual rainfall, ten inches. Distance from railroad, three
miles.

Township 35 N., R. 8 E. A small portion of this township consists of
bottom lands; the remainder is rolling uplands. There is a hot water creek
in sections 17 and 18. The only timber is a few scattering cottonwoods.
Value of the vacant land, $3.50 to $5 per acre. Annual rainfall, under 10
inches. Elevation, 8,000 feet. Distance from railroad, four miles.

Township 32 N., R. 9 E. This township is on the extreme southern
boundary of Colorado, adjoining the New Mexico state line. It is crossed by
railroad. The vacant lands lie on a gravelly mesa and are worthless for
agriculture and stock raising. Annual rainfall, under 10 inches. Elevation
8,500 feet.

Township 32 N., R. 10 E. The surface of this township comprises rolling,
hilly, rough, broken and mountainous land. There is some fair grazing land
used for sheep grazing and occupied by Mexicans. Elevation, 8,000 feet. An-
nual rainfall, 10 inches. Value, $3.50 per acre. Distance from railroad, three
miles.

Township 33 N., R. 10 E. The vacant lands in this township are uplands,
rolling and hilly. The soil is a medium quality. This township is better
adapted for grazing than for cultivation. There is a scattering growth of
pinons and cottonwoods. Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre. Annual rainfall, 5 to 10
inches. Elevation, 8,000 feet. Distance from railroad, four miles.

Township 34 N., R. 10 E. There is some very good farming land in the
rich bottom lands along the Conejos river. The uplands in the eastern part of
the township are generally hilly and second rate, only suitable for grazing.
Value, $3.50 to $5 per acre. Annual rainfall, 5 to 10 inches. Elevation, 8,000
feet. Distance from railroad, three miles.

Township 35 N., R. 10 E. The land along the river is fine bottom land.
The rest of the township is a sterile, alkaline prairie, barren of all vegetation
but sage brush. Value, $3.50 per acre. Annual rainfall, 5 to 10 inches. Ele-
vation, 8,000 feet. Distance from railroad, three miles.

Township 32 N., R. 11 E. On the extreme southern boundary of Colo-
rado, adjoining the New Mexico state line. This township is covered with
high hills and canyons. Some good grazing lands. Fair timber. Much vol-
canic rock. Some stock water. Value, $3.50 per acre. Elevation, 8,000 feet.
Annual rainfall, 10 inches. Distance from railroad, ten miles.

Township 33 N., R. 11 E. The land of this township is very poor; it is
mostly covered with volcanic rock and but little soil. Used for sheep grazing.
Value, $3.50 per acre. Elevation, 8,000 to 9,500 feet. Annual rainfall, ten
inches. Distance from railroad, ten miles.

Township 34 N., R. 11 E. This township lies principally in the San Luis
hills. The surface is rolling and covered with lava. Some parts are quite
rough and mountainous. Third rate soil. Grazing, poor. Value, $3.50 per
acre. Annual rainfall, 10 inches. Elevation, 8,000 to 9,000 feet. Distance
from railroad, ten miles.

Township 35 N., R. 11 E. The vacant lands in this township lie in what
is called the foothills. The soil is poor and is only good for grazing land.
Used for sheep pasture at the present, Value, $3.50 per acre. Elevation, 8,000
feet. Annual rainfall, 10 inches. Distance from railroad, eight miles,.



COSTILLA COUNTY

Costilla county, pronounced Cos-te-a, is located in the extreme southern
portion of Colorado, adjoining the New Mexico state line. This county cov-
ers the east portion of the San Luis Valley. It is walled in on the extreme
east by the Culebra range of mountains and the entire county forms a por-
tion of the Sangre de Cristo grant, being a tract of land granted by the king
of Spain to one of his subjects, at the time this territory belonged to Spain.
The land in this county, therefore, is all under private ownership and not
open to entry. The owners of the estate have placed the land on the market
during the last few years, constructing a railroad and several irrigation
systems.

The county is settling up fairly rapidly. San Luis is the county seat,
with a population of 500.

The approximate value per year of the agricultural products in Costilla
county is as follows:

Grains $160,000.00

Hay 125,000.00

Vegetables and other crops 20,000.00



CROWLEY COUNTY

PUEBLO LAND DISTRICT Area of Vacant Lands, 183,524 Acres.

Crowley county is located in the southeastern part of the State, thirty
miles east of the city of Pueblo and on the north side of the Arkansas river.

The southern part of the county is a very fertile, highly cultivated, irri-
gated district. It is the location of a large sugar factory and an important
producing point for sugar beets, grains, fruits, etc.

The northern portion of the county is comparatively a level plain with
very little surface water, but sufficient rainfall to produce crops by dry
farming methods. It is a good natural range with fine grass.

The lands in this county are all close to a railroad and should prove
very attractive to the settler. While the general character of the soil is
sandy, it has been demonstrated that sandy soil is the most productive of
all soils on the plains and holds the moisture well.

Ordway, with a population of 800, is the county seat. Sugar City, with
a population of 800, is the next city of importance.

Township 18 S., R. 55 W. The surface is rolling. The soil is of medium
quality. This is good grazing land with a fairly good supply of surface
water. A few cottonwood trees are to be found along the creeks. Value,
$5 to $8 per acre. Twelve miles from the railroad. Elevation, 4,700 feet.
Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches.



80 CROWLEY COUNTY



Township 19 S., R. 55 W. The surface is gently rolling. The soil is light
clay loam. There is a large amount of grazing land. Six miles from the
railroad. Value, $3,50 to $8 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Eleva-
tion, 4,500 feet.

Township 20 S., R. 55 W. The surface is gently rolling prairie land.
The soil is a light clay loam. There is no surface water. There is some very
good grazing. The railroad crosses the extreme southeast corner of the town-
ship. Rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 4,500 feet. Value, $5 to $8 per
acre.

Township 18 S., R. 56 W. The surface is level and soil of fair quality.
There is no running water in this township. The grass is generally good.
Value, $5 to $8 per acre. Located thirteen miles from the railroad. Annual
rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 4,500 feet.

Township 19 S., R. 56 W. The surface is very level with some rolling
bluffs along Horse creek. The soil along the creek is very sandy and covered
with sage brush. The creek is dry. The balance of the township com-
prises very good land, covered with good grass. There is very little
water. Located seven miles from the railroad. Value, $5 to $10 per acre.
Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 4,300 feet.

Township 20 S., R. 56 W. The surface is very level. The soil is of
medium quality and is covered with buffalo grass. There is no surface water.
Located one mile from the railroad. Value, $5 to $10 per acre. Annual
rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 4,000 feet.

Township 22 S., R. 56 W. The surface of this township is mostly level;
the southern part slightly rolling. The soil is a light clay loam in places,
and adobe soil in others. Fine grazing. Two miles from railroad. Value,
$7 to $12 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 4,000 feet.

Township 18 S., R. 57 W. The surface is quite level and well covered
with a heavy growth of buffalo grass. There is no surface water. Fifteen
miles from railroad. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 4,700 feet.
Value, $5 to $12 per acre.

Township 19 S., R. 57 W. The surface is level prairie land covered with
a fair stand of buffalo grass. There is no surface water in the township
except in pools along the creeks. Nine miles from railroad. Value, $8 to $12
per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 4,500 feet.

Township 20 S., R. 57 W. The surface is generally level and is covered
with a fair growth of bunch grass. The soil is clay and sandy loam. Three
miles from railroad. Value, $6 to $10 per acre. Elevation, 4,500 feet. Rain-
fall, 10 to 15 inches.

Township 21 S., R. 57 W. This township consists principally of bottom
lands along the river, which are farming lands of first quality and prac-
tically all under irrigation. The uplands are covered with a fair growth
of native grasses and sage brush. There is no stock water on the uplands.
Value, $6 to $12 per acre. Elevation, 4,000 feet. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15
inches.

Township 18 S., R. 58 W. The surface is gently rolling prairie land.
Soil is light and sandy. There is no surface water. Sixteen miles from
railroad. Value, $5 to $12 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Eleva-
tion, 4,800 feet.



CIIOWLEY COUNTY 81



Township 19 S., R. 58 W. The surface is mostly level, with some roll-
ing and some mesa land. There is no surface water. Good grazing. Ten
miles from railroad. Value, $6 to $12 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15
inches. Elevation, 4,500 feet.

Township 20 S., R. 58 W. The surface is rolling prairie land. The soil
is dark and heavy. There is some good buffalo and bunch grass. Very
little water. Some of the land in this township could be irrigated with
pumps which would make it good agricultural land. Five miles from the
railroad. Value, $6 to $12 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Eleva-
tion, 4,500 feet.

Township 21 S., R. 58 W. The surface is partly level and partly rolling
prairie land. There are some cottonwood trees. The soil is a sandy loam.
Railroad crosses the southern portion of this township. A large proportion
of this township is under a canal. There are considerable vacant lands in the
upland district. Value, $6 to $12 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches.
Elevation, 4,000 feet.

Township 18 S., R. 59 W. The surface is prairie land. In this township
the soil is sandy and below the average. There is no surface water. Eighteen
miles from railroad. Value, $5 to $8 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15
inches. Elevation, 5,000 feet.

Township 19 S., R. 59 W. The surface is high and level land. The soil
is sandy. There is quite a growth of bunch and buffalo grass of fair quality.
No surface water. Thirteen miles from the railroad. Value, $6 to $12 per
acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 4,800 feet.

Township 20 S., R. 59 W. The surface is almost level, with some small
sand hills. No surface water. Poor grazing land. Six miles from the rail-
road. Value, $4 to $8 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation,
4,600 feet.

Township 21 S., R. 59 W. The surface of this township varies from good
rolling land to sand hills and bluffs. The soil is generally sandy. No tim-
ber. A few springs. Not much surface water. One mile from the railroad.
Value, $6 to $12 per acre. Annual rainfall, 10 to 15 inches. Elevation, 4,500
feet.



CUSTER COUNTY

PUEBLO LAND DISTRICT Area of Vacant Lands, 142,169 Acres.

Custer county is located in the south-central portion of Colorado. Most
of the county is a rough and mountainous mining and stock raising district.
In Antelope Creek valley, in the western part of the county, is fine agricul-
tural land, a large area of which is under irrigation.

The approximate value per year of the agricultural products in Custer
county is as follows:

Cereals . $ 60,000.00

Hay 170,000.00

Other crops 30,000.00

The total population of Custer county is 2,000. The county seat is Sil-



Online LibraryGeorge S. (George Samuel) ClasonFree homestead lands of Colorado described; a handbook for settlers → online text (page 8 of 39)