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26, 78 note, 96, 140, 192, 218 note,
233, 240, 243 note, 269, 273, 274,
308, 309, 313, 334-52, 374. 389.
390, 398, 418-20, 422-4, 436, 508

^4-' 531. 539. 549-51
Sylvester, Prof. J. J., 444, 445
Sylvia, 148
Symonds, Mr. J. A., 446, 447, 474

Syzygy, 136 sq-

Talfourd, 270
Tarn 0' Shanter, 56 note
Taylor, Sir H. , 272
Taylor, W. , 39, 40, 397
Tennyson, 24, 58, 78 note, 89, 91,
122 note, 124, 147, 150, 170, 183-
217, 220, 222, 234, 239, 240, 249,
251, 269-72, 296-9, 308, 309, 313,
335. 415-17. 420, 421, 430, 436,
S08 sq., 529, 536, 537, 542
Tennyson-Turner, C. , 313
Terza rinia, 106, 107, 112, 361-5
Thackeray, 80, 103, 267, 268, 300,

302, 376
Thalaba, 39, 51-3, 78, 104, 140 note,

177, 250, 295
The I, Book of , 0.2
Thelwall, John, 157-9
Thomas, M. Walter, 468, 469
Thompson, Francis, 384, 385
Thomson, James (the First), 105
Thomson, James (the Second), 308,

372-S
Thomson, Mr. W. , 464, 469, 470,

477
Thoreau, 483
"Through the Metidja," 223



562



INDEX



" Thyrsis," 257, 258

Tillbrook, Samuel, 164, 430

Timbuctoo, 184

" Time of Roses, The," 145

Tillies, The, 530

" Tintern Abbey," 74, 105

Tiriel, 22

Tithonzis, 212, 213

" To Constantia Singing," 113

Traill, Mr. H. D. , 389 note

Triolet, the, 387-91

"Tristram and Iseult," 253

Tristram of Lyonesse, 341, 349

Triumph of Life, The, 112

"Triumph of Time, The," 233

Triumphs of Temper, The, 32

Tucker, 397

Two Poets of Croisic, The, 239

" Ulalume," 485

" Ulysses," Tennyson's, 200, 201
UnknoTvn Eros, The, 386
Urizen, The Book of, 26, 31

Vala, 27, 28

Van Dam and Stoffel, MM., 458-62

Vane's Story, 374

Veley, Margaret, 247 note, 366, 380,

381
Verlaine, 338
\''ernon MS. , 265

Verrier, M., 114 note, 158 note, 463-68
Victor and Cazire, 103
Victories of Love, The, 385
" Vilikins and his Dinah," 137
Vision of Judgment, Byron's, 100, loi
Vision of Judgment, Southey's, 400-403
" Vision of Sin, The," 196, 197, 529
" Vision of the Sea," Shelley's, 114
Plaices of the Night, 488, 489
Voltaire, 60



"Voyage, The," Tennyson's, 210
"Voyage of Maeldune, The," 211,
212, 297

Wade, 314

Wadhani, Edward, 440-42

Walker, John, 154, 155

Walker, Sidney, 438

Waller, 522-35

Wallis, 394

Warner, Dr. John, 160, 161, 164

" Watching of the Falcon, The," 321

Watts, I. , 14, 39

" West Wind, Ode to the," 106 note,

107, 114
" Westminster Abbey," 257, 258
Whewell, 410
" Whistlecraft," 99
White, Blanco, 314
"White, Thomas, jun. ," 492 note
Whitman, Walt, 22, 372, 383, 480,

490-92
Williams, Mr. A. M. , 550
Williams, Helen Maria, 34, 35
Witch of Atlas, The, no, in, 125
Wither, 131, 529
Wolfe, 91 72ote
Woodford, Dr. Samuel, 552
Wordsworth, 46, 48, 60, 68-77, 95

note, 104, 116, 119, 171, 175, 184,

242, 300, 302, 313, 314, 542
Worsley, Mr. , 421
Wortley Montagu, Lady M. , 96 tiote,

140
" Wreck of the Hesperus, The," 489
Wynn, 48, 49, 171

Yeats, Mr. W. B. , 8 note 22, 27, 392

Zoas, The Four, 27, 28
Zophiel, 481



THE END



Printed try R. & R. Clark, Limited, Edinburgh.



A HISTORY OF

ENGLISH PROSODY

FROM THE TWELFTH CENTURY
TO THE PRESENT DAY

By Professor GEORGE SAINTSBURY

Three Vols. 8vo.

Vol. I. From the Origins to Spenser, ios. net.
Vol. II. From Shakespeare to Crabbe. 15s. net.
Vol. III. From Blake to Mr. Swinburne.

SOME PRESS OPINIONS OF VOLUME I.

THE ATHENyEUAI. — "A thing complete and convincing beyond any
former work from the same hand. ' Hardly any one who takes a sufficient interest
in prosody to induce him to read this book ' will fail to find it absorbing, and even
entertaining, as only one other book on the subject of versification is : the Petit
TraM de po^sie franfaise of Theodore de Banville. . . . We await the second
and third volumes of this admirable undertaking with impatience. To stop read-
ing it at the end of the first volume leaves one in just such a state of suspense as
if it had been a novel of adventure, and not the story of the adventures of prosody.
' I am myself quite sure,' says Prof. Saintsbmy, ' that English prosody is, and
has been, a living thing for seven hundred years at least.' That he sees it living
is his supreme praise, and such praise belongs to him only among historians of
English verse."

THE TIMES. — "To Professor Saintsbury English prosody is a living thing,
and not an abstraction. He has read poetry for pleasure long before he began to
read it with a scientific purpose, and so he has learnt what poetry is before making
up his mind what it ought to be. It is a common fault of writers upon prosody
that they set out to discover the laws of music without ever training their ears to
apprehend music. They theorise very plausibly at large, but they betray their
incapacity so soon as they proceed to scan a difficult line. Professor Saintsbury
never fails in this way. He knows a good line from a bad one, and he knows
how a good line ought to be read, even though he may sometimes be doubtful
how it ought to be scanned. He has, therefore, the knowledge most essential to
a writer upon prosody. . . . His object, as he constantly insists, is to write a
history, to tell us what has happened to our prosody from the time when it began
to be English and ceased to be Anglo-Saxon ; not to tell us whether it has
happened rightly or wrongly, nor even to be too ready to tell us why or how it has
happened."

Professor W. P. Ker in the SCOTTISH HISTORICAL EEVIEW.—
" The history of verse, as Mr. Saintsbury takes it, is one aspect of the history of
poetry ; that is to say, the minute examination of structure does not leave out of
account the nature of the living thing ; we are not kept all the time at the
microscope. This is the great beauty of his book ; it is a history of English poetry
in one particular form or mode. . . . The author perceives that the form of verse
is not separable from the soul of poetry ; poetry ' has neither kernel nor husk, but
is all one ' to adapt the phrase of another critic."



SOME PRESS OPINIONS OF VOLUME II.

THE ATHENE UM. — "We have read this volume with as eager an im-
patience as that with which we read the first, for the author is in love with his
subject ; he sees ' that English prosody is and has been a living thing for seven
hundred years at least,' and, knowing that metre, verse pure and simple, is a means
of expressing emotion, he here sets out to show us its development and variety
during the most splendid years of our national consciousness."

THE STANDARD. — ' ' The second volume of Professor Saintsbury's elaborate
work on English prosody is even more interesting than his former volume. Extend-
ing as it does from Shakespeare to Crabbe, it covers the great period of English
poetry and deals with the final development of the prosodic system. It reveals the
encyclopasdic knowledge of English literature and the minute scholarship which
render the Edinburgh professor so eminently suited to this inquiry, which is, we
think, the most important literary adventure he has undertaken. ... It is
certainly the best book on the subject of which it treats, and it will be long indeed
before it is likely to be superseded."

THE CAMBRIDGE RE VIE W.—' ' It is the capacity of being able to depart
from traditional opinion, the evidence shown on every page of independent
thought based upon a first-hand study of documents, which make the present volume
one of the most stimulating that even Professor Saintsbury has written. The work,
as a whole, is a fine testimony to his lack of pedantry, to his catholicity of taste,
to his sturdy common sense, and it exhibits a virtue rare among prosodists (dare
we say among scholars generally?) — courtesy to opponents."

THE PALL MALL GAZETTE. — "This volume is even more fascinating
than was the first. For here there are even greater names concerned — Shakespeare
and Milton. ... It appears to us that Professor Saintsbury hardly writes a page
in which he does not advance by some degree his view of the right laws of verse.
We cannot imagine any one seriously defending, after this majestical work, the old
syllabic notion of scansion. . . . The book is written with all the liveliness of style,
richness of argument, and wealth of material that we expect. Not only is it a
history of prosody ; but it is full of acute judgments on poetry and poets."



OTHER WORKS BY PROFESSOR SAINTSBURY.
A HISTORY OF ELIZABETHAN LITERATURE.

Crown 8vo. "s. 6d.

A HISTORY OF NINETEENTH CENTURY

LITERATURE (1780- 1900). Crown 8vo. 7s. 6d.

A SHORT HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERA-
TURE. Crown Svo. 8s. 6d.

DRYDEN. Library Edition, Crown Svo, 2s. net. Popular
Edition, Crown Svo, is. 6d. Sewed, is. Pocket Edition,
Fcap, Svo, IS. net.

MACMILLAN AND CO., Ltd., LONDON.



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Online LibraryGeorge SaintsburyA history of English prosody from the twelfth century to the present day (Volume 3) → online text (page 50 of 50)