George Stanley Faber.

Horae Mosaicae, or, A view of the Mosaical records with respect to their coincidence with profane antiquity, their internal credibility, and their connection with Christianity .. (Volume 2) online

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LIBRARY

PIUM'ETON, N. J.

No. Case,
No. Sl>rli\



BR 45 .B35 1801 v. 2



Hampton lectures




HOR^ MOSAICE;

OR

A VIEW OF THE MOSAICAL RECORDS,

WITH RESPECT TO

THEIR COINCIDENCE WITH PROFANE ANTIQUITY ;
THEIR INTERNAL CREDIBIIJTY5

AND

THEIR CONNECTION WITH CHRISTIANITY:

COMPREHENDING

The Subftance of Eight Leaures read before the Univerfity
of Oxford, in the Year 1801 5 purfuant to the Will of
' the late Rev. John Bamptots^^^ A.M. ;*; £•



BY GEORGE STANLEY FABER, A.M.

FELLOW OF LINC. COLL.



VOL. n.



Long, de Sub. fe6l, ix.



OXFORD,

At the University Press, for the AuTiifoR :

Sold by W. Hanwell and J. Parker ; and J. Cooke : alfo by

F.andC.RiviNGTON, St. Paul's Church- Yardj and

J. Hatchard, Piccadilly, London,

MDCCCI.



^Biisrosr©^




CONTENTS



OF



VOL, IL



BOOK II.

THE CONNECTION BETWEEN THE MOSAICAL
AND CHRISTIAN DISPENSATIONS,

SECT. I.

Erroneous Opinions refpedling their ConnecSlion,

CHAP. I.

Error of certain of the Gentile Converts refpefting the Con-
ne6tion of Judaifm and Chriftianity, p. 3. i. The Gnof-
tics, p. 6. 2. Cerinthus, p. 16. 3. Manes, p. 17. 4. Othet
fimilar Heretics, p. 26.

CHAP. 11,

Error refpefling the Conne6lion of the Law and the Gofpel
peculiar to the Jews, p. 28. i. The great Body of the
Jewilh Nation, p. 28. 2. The Jews, who embraced
Chriftianity during the Miniftry of our Lord, p. 32.
3. Jewilh Chriftians after the death of our Lord, p. 35.

VOL. II. A '" SECT,



Iv CONTENTS.



SECT. II.

The Conne6lion between Judaifm and Chriftianity
by means of Types.

CHAP. I.
The End of the Eftabllfhment of the Law of Mofes, p. 40..

CHAP. II.

The Ceremonial Law, p. 46. i. Sacrifices, p; 59. 2. The
Scape-Goat, p. 6g. 3. The Kigh-Prieft_, p. 70. 4. The
Paflbver, p. 72. 5. Legal Impurity, p. 78. 6. The Red
Heifer, p. 83. 7. The Cities of Refuge, p. 87. 8. Un -
clean Meats, p. 88.

CHAP. III.

The Paflfage of Ifrael through the Red Sea, typical of the
Laver of Regeneration, p. 93. Nature of Regeneration,
p. 10 1. It reftores Man to the prifline Image of Adam,
p. no. A tendency to Sin even in the Regenerate,
p. 120. The Neceffity of Regeneration, p, 124,

CHAP. IV.

Eminent Chara(^ers typical of Chrift, p. 133. I. Adam.,
p. 134. 2. Melchizedek, p. 134. 3. Ifaac and Ifmael,
p. 137. 4. Ifaac, p. 138. 5. Jofeph, p. 142. 6. Mofes,
Marah, Manna, Maflah and Meribah, the Brazen Ser-
pent, p. 146. 7. Aaron, p. 162. 8. Elijah, p. 167.
9. David and Solomon, p. 168. Solomon's Song com-
pared with other Specimens of Oriental Poetry, p. lyS-

CHAP. V.

Opinions of the Jews, p. 184.

SECT.



CONTENTS. V

SECT. III.
Their Conne6lion by means of Prophecy.

CHAP. L

Prophecies, which define the Family of the Meffiah, p. 193,

1. Prophecy of the Meffiah delivered to Eve, p. 194.

2. Prophecy of Noah, p. 197. 3. Prophecy delivered to
Abraham, p. 199. 4, To Ifaac, p. 202. 5. To Jacob^
p. 203. 6. To Judah, p. 203. 7. To David, p. 205.

CHAP. II.

Prophecies relating to the Office and Charatfter of the Mef-
fiah, the Call of the Gentiles, and the Rejeftion of the
Jews, p. 213. I. Contained in the Pfalms, p. 216.

2. Ifaiah, p. 223. 3. Jeremiah, p. 241. 4. Ezekiel,
p. 243. 5. Daniel, p. 244. 6. Amos, p. 248. 7. Micah,
p. 249. 8. Haggai, p. 253. 9. Zechariah, p. 254. 10.
Malachi, p. 263.

CHAP. III.

Prophecies, which declare that the Law was to be fuper-
feded by the Gofpel, p. 266. i. Prophecy of Mofes,
p. 266. 2. Prophecies contained in the Pfalms, p. 272.

3. Ifaiah, p. 273. 4. Jeremiah, p. 276. 5. Daniel^
p. 278. 6. Hofea, p. 279. 7. Amos, p. 280, 8. Malachi,
p. aSi*

SECT. IV.

The praiStical Connexion between the Law and the
Gofpel,

CHAP. J,

The Law a Schoolmafter to bring us imto Chrift, p. 285.

CHAP.



vi CONTENTS.



CHAP. II.

Neceflity of a perfeft Difpenfation like the Chriftian, ar-
gued from the Imperfe6tion of the Mofaical, p. 30^,
I. The Law, in what fenfe imperfect ; i. As being
only a part of a whole, p. 334. 2. As being calculated
only for a fmall Nation, p. 335. 3. As having had its
typical Rites accompllfhed, and fuperfeded by their re-
alities, p. 226. II. Chriftianity perfe6l, by being in every
neceflary point the very reverfe of the Law j i . Not bur-
dened by Ceremonies, p. 337. 2. Defigned for all man-
kind, p. 337. 3. The Ritual left to the Difcretion of each
particular Church, p. 338. 4. Requires internal Purity^
in Oppofition to the various Waihings of the Law, p. 2 39-

5. Forbids Divorces, except in cafe of Adultery, p. 339.

6. Forbids Revenge, p. 340. 7. St. Paul's Parallel be-
tween Mofes and Chrift, p. 341. 8. Chriftianity perfect
in three feveral RefpeCts, p. 341. Conclufion.



HORiE MOSAIC.'E.

BOOK II.
VIEW

OF

THE CONNECTION-

BETWEEN

JUDAISM AND CHRISTIANITY



dcci(r^j^o$ a$ Xcis-iayKriji.oy. Ignat. Epill. ad Magncf.



VOL. IT. B



PEIITGETOIT




BOOK IL

THE CONNECTION BETWEEN THE MO-
SAICAL AND CHRISTIAN DISPENSA.
TIONS.



SECT. I,



ERRONEOUS OPINIONS RESPECTING
THEIR CONNECTION.



C H A P. I.

ERROR OF CERTAIN OF THE GENTILE CON-
VERTS RESPECTING THE CONNECTION
OF JUDAISM AND CHRISTIANITY. I. THE
GNOSTICS. 2. CERINTHUS. 3. MANES. 4.
OTHER SIMILAR HERETICS.

JL HERE is a moil unfortunate propenfity Error of
in human nature, to adapt every theologi- ^he^Gemfie
cal doftrine, which claims its attention, to f^^^fj^'^'^'^;
certain preconceived opinions, and imagi- o" j^f^f '^^^^
nary eftabhihed truths. Inftead of raifino; ^"^ ^^''^^
its ideas to thp ftandard of revelation, it

B 2, de-



^ 110II.E MOSATCiE.

SECT, dcliifhts rather to reduce revelation to its
I. own level; and, inftead of preparing itfelf

to receive fomethlng totally unexpected, it

is unwilling to admit any pofition, which
cannot be reconciled with prior and fa-
vourite fyftems. The natural confequence
of fuch a temper of mind is, to miftake
the plainell declarations of Scripture, and
to overlook or contradid: its cleareft and
moft obvious affertions ; to affume the au-
thority of a judge, rather than to put on
the fubmiffive meeknefs of a difciple, and
to reje(5l with prefumptuous boldnefs the
dccifions even of the Almighty himfelf.

This truth was never more forcibly ex-
emplified, than in the manner in which
Chriftianity was frequently received, at its
firll: promulgation. Built profeffedly upon
the Law of Mofes, and replete with the
moft direft references to the Jewilh types
and prophecies, the Gofpel fought not to
overthrow, but to accomplifli the vene-
rable code of the Pentateuch. Throu2:h-
out the whole of the facrcd volume of the
ancient Scriptures, the promifcd Meffiah is
perpetually kept in view ; his characfler is
^ accurately delineated ; and his fufferlngs

arc defcribcd with a precifion, to which

no



HORiE MOSAICS. 5

no human forefight could have attained, chap,
Pirom the firfl: myftcrlous prcdidion, that i.

" the feed of the woman Ihould bruife the

^^ head of the ferpent," to the conchiding
declaration of Malachi, that *^^ the fun of
" righteoufnefs Ihould arife with healing
" m his wings ;" „type is joined to type,
and prophecy accumulated upon prophecy,
till faith is raifed to the higheft pitch of
anxious expeclation. At length the won-
derful Perfonage, whofe advent had been
fo particularly announced, defcends from
the right hand of his father ; and com-
mences a life of patient fuffering, for the
fake of loft mankind. The Law now re-
ceives its accomplifliment ; and the Gof-
pel of Chrift is difcovered to be the end
both of the fimple worfhip of the Patri-
archs, and of the gorgeous folemnities of
the Temple. The dulky fhadows of the
morning are difperfed ; and the fun of
righteoufnefs, blazing with ineffable luftre,
pours forth the full flood of day upon a
benighted world.

The connection between the two grand
component parts of God's covenant with
man, though fo . repeatedly pointed out in
both, was ncverthelefs incomprehenfible to

B 3 num-



S HORyE MOSAICiE.

SECT, numbers of the Jewlfli, as well as of the
I. Gentile converts. This part of the won-

derful fcheme of revelation became, even

to fome of the converted Heathens, foolifli-
nefs, and to fome of the converted Ifrael-
ites, a ftumbling-block. The errors of the
firft arofe, principally, from perverting and
undervaluing the Mofaical difpenfation :
the errors of the fecond, from miftaking its
intent. The Gentiles denied its divine ori-
gin ; the Jews ignorantly fuppofed it to be
a perfect whole, when, in reality, it formed
only one half of the grand plan of grace
and redemption, predetermined by God
from the foundation of the world.



The Gno-



I. The principal and moft dangerous of
lues. the errors maintained by thefe Gentile con-
verts fprung from that w^himfical and fan-
tallic fyflem of theology, the Oriental phi-
lofophy. The Perfian doftrine of two op-
pofite principles feems to have been the
true fource both of Gnofticifm and Mani-
chelfm ; and it is eafy to conceive, w hat
ftrange confufion fuch tenets would occa-
fion, when applied to Chriftianity.

According to fome of thefe philofophers,
the good principle, whom they llyled Or-

muzd,



HORiE MOSAICiE. -;

muzd, and who was the fountain of life, chap.
light, and happinefs, was an eternal and i.

neceifarily exifting being ; while the evil ^

principle denominated Ahriman was a cre-
ated God, who prefided over darknefs, vice,
and mifery.

Others again fuppofed them both to be
eternal ; and that, as Ormuzd created a/
number of pure fpirits, or angels, fimilar
to himfelf in difpofition ; fo Ahriman pro-
duced a hoft of evil and corrupt Genii,
whofe temper refembled the depravity of
their author ^

To thefe opinions the Gnoftics adapted
Chriftianity. Upon their fcheme, the
prince of darknefs was the creator of the
world ^, in which were inherent the feeds
of all evil, compofed as it is of ftubborn
and corrupt matter. From this matter he

* Hyde de Rel. vet. Perf. cap. 9.

^ This notion is hinted at by Clemens AlexandrinuSj — >

cEcog' a^ioi yoc^ oj ^o^ui ccvroj. Strom, lib. iv. According to
the account given of this fe6l by Epiphanius, the Creator
of the world was one of the {tYcn. princes of the fpheres,
whom they abfurdly called Sabaoth. Epiph. adv. Haer,
lib. i. ' ■

B 4 alfo



8 lIORif: MOSAICS.

SECT, alfo formed the bodies of men, and in-
T. clofcd within them rational fouls, which

were particles of the pure and ethereal

light, that compofcd the eifence of God.
Such imprifonment is equally againft the
will of God, and the inclination of the
foul, which loaths its bafe and terreftrial
companion, and perpetually ftruggles to
regain its native freedom.

The fame evil being, whom they fome-
times called demiurge, was the God of the
Old Teftament, and the author of the
Jewifli law ; a .law confifting of carnal or-
dinances and ceremonies, which, as they
concern matter, muft: ncceffarily partake
of its evil properties. Such a law was
folely calculated to debafe that nation into
the m.ofh abjed: flavery, and to withdraw
their fouls from the contemplation of their
ccleftlal origin, by plunging them into the
midft of ceremonial obfervances relating
merely to the body.

The author of light and goodnefs at.
length pitied the miferable flate of man-
kind, who all, as well as the Jews, were
under the tyranny of the prince of dark-
nels. Tlie modes indeed of their fervitude

might



HORt^: MOSAICiE. 9

might vary, but the minds of all were chap.
equally darkened, and they all bowed their i.

necks beneath the galling yoke of this ^

powerful ufurper. The fupreme Being
fent a celeftial meffenger from the fulnefs ""
of happinefs and glory, in which he dwelt,
and invefted him with a human form ^.
The name of this heavenly delegate was
Chrift ^ and, though in appearance a man,
yet he was in reality only a fliadowy phan-
tom. His body was not like our bodies,
but merely vifionary ; fince it would be
contradidory to imagine, that he, who
came to oppofe the influence of matter,
lliould be clothed in matter ^



^ Epiph. adv. Haer. lib. n.

* Epiph. adv. Hser. lib. i. Dr. Lardner, in his Supple-
ment to the Credibility, is unwilling to allow, that St. John
v/rote his Gofpel in oppofition to the Docetse j but the ge-
neral opinion^ refpefting the purport of thai Gofpel, is cer-
tainly ftrengthened very confiderably by the words of Igna-
tius of Antioch, the difcipk of St. John, and who confe-
quently may be fuppofed, in an efpecial manner, to have
entered into the views of his mailer. Ao|ai^w IviarHv X^iroi- to»
©£oy Tov hrw(; vi^.u^ ao(picrocvrcc, 'Evovjcroi ya.^ iifxccq KocrripriciAives

X^tfy, cufKi T£ xa» TTVBViACcrii y.cci l^pao-^eys; ev ocyacTT'/t iv ru a*-
paTt X^jrifj 9rE7r?wr;|;o^op//.£voyj ei? rov xuptow rn^cov, otKri^ug oir^ zk
T'evy? AaCto y.ocva, (retpy.cc, vlov Sf» Kara. ■^bXyjixcc kch ovvcci/av -^bov,
yiyiV'/i^Avov uTwi^uxi ex rra^^zvoVf |3eba7rT*i7^£voy viro luocvvov, ivos,



10 HOR.E MOSAICS.

SECT. This illuftrious perfonage immediately
I. attacked the ftrong holds of the prince of

■ darkncfs, and . ridiculed the authority and

inefficacy of his rites and ceremonies ^.
While he attempted to withdraw the hu-
man foul from the intolerable thraldom
impofed upon her, he laboured alfo to raife
her thoughts to the bounteous author of
light and goodnefs, and to elevate her con-
ceptions above the fordid views of the ma-
terial world. Since the foul w^as for a
feafon linked to a grofs and fluggifli yoke-
lellovv, Ihc was to anticipate with joy the
moment of her emancipation from fo dif-
graceful a fervitudc ; and in the mean time
was to cooperate with the heavenly teacher,
by making fuch a progrefs towards internal
purity, as her prefent fcanty powers would
permit. This could only be effected by a
vigorous refiftancc to the pafficns and ap-
petites of the body ; and the moft effectual

hfucou TiTpa^^ov y.u?r>\ci}yAvov lirt^ vjjjluv iv cufx; — TccvToc yai>

aXr,^at( uiiTr.cnv iocvTOP, ov^ ua-Trtp UTTifOi tu'ej T^syaciv to c/ox£»?
46tToi' TTe/. o;vtvat, mvtoi to ookbiv ovte;, aai xaS&'j, ^covacrm xa»
c-ty^rtO-tTUi uvTOH, i^crnf acrwv.aTOj? xat ^xi^ovikok;. 'Eyu yx^ xxt
{Mirtz rr.v atxrcta-iv iv aapKi uircv ci^jc, y.xi Trirstw oyTa, Epill.
acl Stnyrn,

^ Ireii. lib. i. c. 29.

way



nORJE MOSAICS. " tt

way to fubdue this domeilic and confe- chap,
quently more dangerous enemy, was to i,

pra6life continual abftinence and mortifi

cation. Thus, even in this world, it was
poffible to attain to a confiderable degree
of abftra<5lion from the concerns of the
flefh, by macerating the evil matter of
which the body is compofed, till every
grofs and impure inclination died away
within it^.

s The do6lrme of the metempfychofis was likewlfe main-
tained by the Gnollics, for the purpofe of purification from
the taints contrafted in the flefli. The peculiar manner, in
which they exprelTed this tenet, fingularly agrees with the
notions of the philofophers of the eafl:, from whom indeed
their fantattic fyftem of theology was borrowed. Epipha-
nius informs us, that *' They conceive the Ruler of this
** world to be in fhape like a Dragon, and that the fouls of
" men, during a ftate of uriconfcioufnefs, are firft abforbed
" by him, and afterwards again emitted upon the earth.
" They next pafs through the forms of fwine, and other
'*■ animals^ and are then again hurried through the fame
** lofty revolution as before." Epiph. adv. Haer. lib. i. In.
this paflage may be evidentl)'- difcovered that belief in- a
kind of fidereal metempfychofis, which formed fo promi-
nent a feature in the religion of the Oriental world. The
Dragon here fpoken of appears to allude to the Draco and
Serpentarius of the fphere, which were introduced into the
Eleufinian and Mithratic myfleries, where the paffage of
the foul through the difl"erent fidereal orbs in its progrefs to
purity was exhibited. Maurice's Ind. Ant. vol. v. p. ^^6.
and 996. Porphyry, in his treatife upon the Homeric cave
of the nymphs^ accurately defcribes the whole of this ima-
ginary



[3 nOR.E MOSAICS.

SECT. A dodrlnc fo fplritualizcd as this, and
I. fo oppofite to, and deftruftive of, the reU-

■ gion of the God of the Jews, could not

fail both to alarm and irritate that ufurper.
Burninc; with rajze to fee his dominions
thus invaded, he llirred up his faithful ad-
herents, the Priefts and Pharifees, to a bit-
ter and determined oppofition of thefe in-
novations, and transfufed all his own ve-
nom into their bofoms ^. The confequence
was, that they apprehended Chrift, con-
demned him to death, and crucified him.
But, though he appeared to the eyes of
the fpeftators to die, the whole fcene of
his torments was a mere delufion ; for his
body being vifionary, and not fubflantial,
it was impoffible, that he fliould really
fuffer, for the fms of the world, the pains
which he feemed to undergo upon the
crofs. This however did not happen, till
Chrift had fojourned a fufficient length of



glnary metempfychofis. Aio av rccvrug i^ivro TriXotg, Ka^y.»-
>0Vj y.cci AiyoKipuVy ol QsoXoyo/ TiT^urciiy oi ovo ^ojao, i^n' rovTuv

amotaw' a»~oc Ka^xjjio? [xer, Boceiog XAi y.xTctcscTiy.o;' AiyoK-fui^
CB voTto,-, xa» avataTJXoj* er* ^e Ta [xev. Bofnott ^i^uv £ij ynii(Tni

de An. Nymph.

^ Ircii. lib. i. (?. 34.

time



HORyE MOSAICrS. 13

time upon earth, to anfwer the ends of his chap.
miffion. His apoftles and difciples, ani- i.

mated with the fame zeal, continued to

preach the fame doftrines of mental purity
and abftraftion, in defiance of the oppo-
fition, that they every where encountered
from the wretched tools of the Prince of
darknefs. Hence arofe bloody perfecutions,
which neverthelefs were entirely difregarded
by the true convert; becaufe, though they
might injure his contemptible and material
part, yet they tended only to refine and
purify his foul, rendering it more fit to be
received into the fulnefs of God.

The natural confequence of thefe fan-
taftic and impious tenets, was the entire
rejection of the Old Teftament ; not in-
deed fo much as an impofture of human
contrivance, but as being the invention of
their profeiTed enemy, the author of evil,
and as tending therefore to reduce the foul
under the dominion of corrupt matter \
They like wife were obliged to rejed: all
thofe parts of the Gofpel, which contra-
dicted this prepofterous doftrine, as if they
were only traps laid, to infnare their faith.



^ S. Aug. Conf. lib. v. & Iren. lib. ill. c. 12.



*o



by



t4 IIOR^E MOSAICi^.

SECT, by the cunning of the Prince of darknefs ^
I. In order to prefervc confiftency in their

— '^ — notions, they traduced the moft illuftrious
perfonages that flouriihed under the Law^;
while they confidered with the high eft de-
gree of veneration thofe characters, whom
the Old Teftament reorobates as abomi-
nable. Thus the ferpent, that fedaced
Eve, was a benignant ipirit, vvhofe only
aim was to free our firft parents from the
tyranny of the Prince of darknefs. Korah,
Dathan, and Abiram, who oppofed Mofes
the inftrument of the God of the Jews,
and perifhed in confequence of it, were
courageous affertors of the truth, and mar-
tyrs in the caufe of virtue. Nay, even the
moft abandoned and profligate characters
recorded in Scripture"^, fome of whom fuf-
fered a dreadful and exemplary punifli-
ment ", were extolled by this perverfe and
wrong-headed feCt, as mirrors of goodnefs,
and patterns fit for imitation^.

^ Ircn. lib. I, c. 29.
^ S. Aug. Conf. lib. iil.
™ Iren. lib. i. c. 29.
" Gen. xix. 24.

* NotwithflanJing the vaunted fpirituality of their doc-
trines, many of thefe heretics, a6ling up to this idea, were
immerfed in the grofleft profligacy of manners j a melan-
choly



HOR^ MOSAICS. IS

Thefe are the principal outlines of Gno- chaf.
fticifm, or Chriflianity, if it can be called i.

by that holy and reverend name, adapted

to the vagaries of the Oriental philofophy.
Some of the features did indeed occa-
fionally vary, according to the depraved
fancy and vain imagination of different
herefiarchs, who ftarted up during the two
or three firft centuries after Chrift, but the
fubftance remained nearly unaltered. Truth
alone can boaft of abfolute unity ; error is
ever various and changeable p.

choly proof of the tendency of human nature to evil, when
it fets up its own fpeculations above Scripture. Eiatv ^' oi
Tviv fsjuv^rjy.ov A(pco^iT7:v '/.oivwvixv ^jLVriy.r^v CivocyofBiban — ^paai y Hv
rivoc uvTuv, *3^£TEP<34 >sTUfi^eva;, u^ona rnv oij/if, ^^ocrsX^ovrcc (pancci,
Tty^a.'nloci, Uct,vii ru atlavl* at ^loe. Clem. Alex. Strom, lib. iii.
Theodoret likewife reprobates in llrong terms their abomi-
nable corruptions. TYiV h itoa v£voiAO^ery)[ji.tv/jt> <:^u^ avrm x.cct
<i!jpa.rlo[xevriv 7\a.yvnocV} a^e ruv sv a-/.v)VY) tk 'ri^fiu[jt,[j(.ivci)v a^acrp^oix
civ V} (pfxaoii, V] AeyovTwv aMwy axacat* Toaerov uToT^n'mi x.oti toi'<;
gTricT'/jjLco'j? Tviq a,<ji.'KytiU5 epyarccq. Haeret. Fab, Ded. The im-
purities of this deteftable fe6l are detailed with ih difgufting
an accuracy by Epiphanius^ that I refrain from quoting his
words.

,P A more particular account of this feA may be found in
EplphaniuSj under its various branches and denominations,
for the word Gnofiic is a generic term. Kut 'ujavrs^ TvuTi^?

AMa KCii liaaiT^noTig, y.cn Taro^viT^o?, >:cci KoXoptacro^j TlroMixonog
l-E «af TeKav^oi;, KafTroy.poc^, y.ai u'XKoi tcrAEiot;?. EpiPH. adv.Hae-

ref. lib, i. See alfo Iren. lib. i. paffim.

2. Cc~



i5 HOK.^ MOSAICS.

SECT. 5. Cerinthiis fuppofed, that the God of
I. the Jews was not the eternal and inde^
pendent principle of evil, but a created



Ccrintiius. being, who, although the Author of the
univerfe, was at the fame time ignorant of
his own origin. The Almighty fent Chrift
to refcue mankind, and efpecially the Jews,
from his tyranny. This celeftial being, de-
fcending in the form of a dove, chofe for
his mortal habitation the perfon of Jefus,
the fon of Jofeph and Mary, a Jew emi-
nent for his piety, and the devotion, to
which he had elevated his foul, by ab-
ftracting it from the taint of malignant
matter. The God of the Jews^ enraged at
the doftrines w^hich he taught, as tending
to fubvert his empire, flirred up the rulers
againft him, who, in conjundiion w4th the
Roman power, crucified him. Then it
was that the celeftial Spirit quitted its
temporary abode, and returned into the
bofom of God, while the man Jefus alone
was left to fuffcr a painful and ignominious
death. Notw^ithftanding the low opinion,
which Cerinthus entertained of the God
of the Jews, yet he prefcribed to his fol-
lowers the obfcrvance of part of the Mo-
faical Law ; herein differing moft abfurdly
from the other Gnoftics, who at leaft had

the



HORi^ MOSAICiE. 17

the merit of being confiftent in error, how- chap.
ever grofs might be their miftakes^. i.



q. Manes, who flouriflied in the third 3



century, mixed the philofophical fpecu-
lation of the dod;rine of two principles,
with the Perfian theology of a middle God.
That character he applied to Chrift, and
adopted, in addition to his other opinions,
the tenets which the Mithratic myfteries
taught refpecSing a purification, to be ob-
tained only by the tranfmigration of fouls,
and by their lufFering the pains of two
fucceffive purgatories of water and fire^

^ Theodoret. Haeret. Fab. lib. li. c.3. — Epiph.adv. Hae-
ret. lib. i. — Eufeb. Hid. Ecclef. lib. iii. c. 28. — Iren. lib. i.
c. 25.

^ The Eleufinian myfteries, in which thefe do6lrines were
maintained, appear to have been much the fame as the Mi-
thratic. See Porphyr. de Antro Nympharum, and War-
burton's Divine Legation, b. ii. fedl. 4. According to the
latter of thefe Authors, the fixth book of the Mvit\(\ con-
tains a poetical delineation of them. There is certainly one
paflage, which fmgularly agrees with the Manichean notion
of penance.

*"' Aliis fub gurgite vailo

" Infe6lum eluitur fcelus, aut exuritur igni.'*

iEneid. lib. vi. ver. 741.
It Is not improbable, that the notion of a kind of purgatory
after death, equally adopted by the ancient Perfians, Mani-
cheans, and Papifts, may have been derived from Hindoftan.
In the Inftitutes oi Menu, the foul is faid to fufFer torments

VOL. II. c after



Manes.



i8 HOR.E MOSAICS.

SECT. Like the other Gnoftics, he fuppofed mat-
I. ter to be inveterately ftubborn and cor-

rupt ; hut, inftead of afferting the world

to be the work of the evil pruiciple, lie


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