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George Washington Nance.

The Nance memorial; a history of the Nance family in general; but more particularly of Clement Nance, of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, and descendants, containing historical and biographical records with family lineage online

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Online LibraryGeorge Washington NanceThe Nance memorial; a history of the Nance family in general; but more particularly of Clement Nance, of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, and descendants, containing historical and biographical records with family lineage → online text (page 1 of 27)
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This is an authorized facsimile of the original book, and was
produced in 1967 by microfilm-xerography by University
Microfilms, A Xerox Company, Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.A.

* * *



The Nance Memorial



A HISTORY OF THE

/ AT




NANCE FAMILY IN GENERAL



But More Particularly of Clement Nance, of Pittsyl-
vania County, Virginia, and Descendants,
Containing Historical and Biographical
Records with Family Lineage



^rEBr W. NANCE
ii



.i_«—



It it wise for ut to recur to the history of our ancestors. Those whe do not look upon
themselves as a link connecting the Past and the Future, do not perform their duty to the
world.— Daniel Wbbstrr.



1901:

J. K. Burke & Co., Printer*
MootniiiKtun, 111.



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Your Fellow-Kinsman,

GEO. W. NANCE.



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H The Nance Memorial.






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Come, walk with me, adown the aisles,

Of our ancestral halls,

And learn of those, whose hearts and lives

Were filled with love of God, and human love,

And crowned, by His grace.

Take pride, your ancestry was pure,

Of sturdy, wholesome stock,

That scorned a meanness, or a wrong ;

A name which none could mock.

These pioneers, who left their homes, —

New fields, to till and try,

And dangers brave, and trials meet,

They made their mark, indellible,

And stamped it on the race,

Those yet to come, in honest pride,

To bear an opon, fearless face.

Those who in this, the later day,

Are numbered in " The Line,"

And in the " Record " have a place,

Do here give thanks, and homage yield

Our brave ancestors — gone.

^—Joanna Shields -Warren.







Thk Nance Memorial. in



SACRED
to the memory of

CLEMENT NANCE,

preacher, poet, pioneer, judge, and patriarch ;
ancestral head of Part I., is this volume affectionately dedicated

by his great-grandson,
The Author.



The; patriarch is the mightiest of Kings ; he rules over countless gener-
ations, not with laws written on tables of stone, but by the impress of
his own character stamped in the nature of his posterity. So Ish-
mael stamped the Arab character more than forty centuries ago,
and so Abraham became the father of a wonderous pro-
geny, touched later by Jacob's greed. Clement Nance
has already laid his wand of empire on several
generations, and religion, probity, intelligence,
and high and holy purpose is the message
he is sending down the ages. His scep-
ter over generations yet unborn
is a scepter of righteousnes.

— {Rev.) JV.y. Ayllsworth.



" Blessed is the man that feareth the Lord and that delighteth greatly
in his commandments. His seed shall be mighty upon the earth; the
generations of the upright shall be blessed." — Ps. 112:1, 2.



1



I



IV



The Nance Memorial.





PER MARE PER TERRAS



NANCE "COAT OK ARMS.



" Semper-idem M — the same always,
Whether the days be many or few,

" Semper-idem " thus we praise,
One whom we know to be true.

This " Coat of Arms," a race belongs
Whose history is not fully known,

But that to Nance — whose lineage's traced
In this Memorial's by them owned.

To be of " Semper-idem " stock,
With lives well regulate, and true,

Is honor greatly to be prized, —

The old gauge's better than the new.

11 Semper-idem,"

— Joe.



V

There are two ways of spelling the motto on this Coat of Arms. Cousin
Joanna prefers the one generally used, while Queen Elizabeth and the origi-
nal owner used the other form. The meaning is the same, "always the



same.



The name of the original owner is not known, nor is his nationality,
whether English or French. The origin and history of the larger n Coat of
Arms " is also unknown.



The Nance Memorial. v



PREFACE.



When the author began the gathering of data presented in
this volume, about January, 1892, he had no thought of a pub-
lished Memorial. David L,. Demorest, father of Mrs. Nance,
having prepared his own family tree of eleven generations a id
twenty thousand names, urged the privilege of doing the same
for the author.

Before Father Demorest became too old to use pen and ink, he
had placed on the Nance family tree, two thousand six hundred
and fifty names. The author had become interested and con-
tinued the gathering of data. Different persons wrote urging the
publication of a Nance history.

After his return from New Albany, September, 1901, the
author first gave serious thought to the publication of a family
history.

The author is under obligation to all those who have furnished
data of their own families. These are too numerous to mention.

To those who have gone outside their own families, sending
data and assisting in other ways, he wishes to mention by name.

The most prominent of these, doing more than any other, is
Cousin William Mitchell, mentioned at length at the proper place.
Space forbids the mentioning of more than the names of others :
James D. Nance, Versalia Inman, Jas. H. Richardson, Merica* P.
Oatman, Media Causey, Prof. Chas. W. Shields, Dr. Willis O.
Nance, and Herbert A. Barrows, deserve special mention. These
are all of Part I.

Clement Nance, ancestral head of Part I., left a trunk full of
genealogical manuscript that was burned when the home of Susan
Nance Gresham was destroyed by fire in 1867. No one has been
found who had seen the contents, though several remember the
trunk and were aware of the nature of the contents. With the
burning of that trunk all knowledge of the ancestry of our
honored dead seems to have perished from the earth.



vi The Nance Memorial.

The author is not aware that any other person has ever
attempted to write a history of the family.

A goodly number outside of Part I., have taken deep interest
in the progress of the Memorial, aiding in every way possible.

Only a few of the most persistent and efficient can be named
here: J. A. McDannel, Washington, D. C. ; W. E. Nance, Car-
diff, Wales; D. C. Nance, Cedar Hill, Texas; Miss Bathenia H.
Nance, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, and S. E. Nance and family, of
Petersburg, Illinois, deserve special mention.

Whole families would have had to be omitted, and in fact
some have been, but for the interest taken '..y others, who, in
addition to their own families, have done what they could to
supply the lack of interest in their relatives. Should any member
of a family who has not personally furnished records, reading this
Memorial, find his family incomplete or incorrect, let him blame
himself for not having insured its correctness, by sending the very
knowledge by which he judges of the error herein found.

And now a last word. The author is proud of his work. It
is the child of his mature life ; the joy of his declining years. He
presents it with all of its imperfections, without apology. He has
done the best he could. lie makes no claim to literary merit.
He has tried to M tell the tale as 'twas told to him," in common,
every-day language. The lack of interest on the part of many
has been the only source of annoyance, yet he does not complain,
for the letters of appreciation have been many and warm.

The work has been a labor of love, in which he has taken
great delight. He presents the Memorial as a parent would a
fond child, asking that it be received without expressions of dis-
like over its imperfections ; but he would be pleased to have
words of approval from those who have longed for its appearance,

if it prove not a disappointment.

The Author.

Bloomington, 111., July, 1904.



/

/



Thb Nancr Memorial. vii



INTRODUCTION.



The plan of the genealogical tables in this work is so nniqne
that it may require some explanation, but when understood, is so
simple that the most careless may read and trace his genealogy
most easily.

As far as known to the author no work has ever been pub-
lished following the plan of this work. The tree form idea was
obtained from David L. Demorest, father-in-law of the author.
The calling of the generations by the parts of the tree is original
in the author.

Beginning with the ancestral head of Part I., he is called the
trunk. The trunk divides into limbs, the limbs into branches,
they into twigs. The twigs bear buds which bring forth blossoms,
and the blossoms grow into fruit. So the seven parts of the tree
answer to the seven generations of Part I. The ancestors of our
trunk, if they were known, might be called roots, as indeed some
of the families have more than one generation before the one des-
ignated as trunk.

It has been the aim of the author to call the brothers, sisters,
cousins, and supposed cousins of our Clement, trunks of their
respective families, and where no definite relationship was known,
to call those of same day and generation, as near as may be, the
trunk. Thus several of the families have one or more ancestors
of their trunks that might be called roots, if one wished to run
the simile into the ground.

The advantage is this : Limbs of a common trunk are brothers
aud sisters. Branches of* a common limb are also brothers and
sisters. So also are twigs of a common branch brothers and
sisters. Twigs having a common trunk, limb and branch are also
brothers and sisters, while twigs having a common trunk and
limb, but different branches, are cousins. If, however, the trunk
only is common, then the twigs are second cousins. If the trunks
also are different, then the twigs are third cousins, provided, of
course, the truuks are brothers and sisters. If, however, the



viii The Nance Memorial.



trunks were cousins, then the twigs are fourth cousins. Thus
the twigs in the families of William Howe, Zachariah I., David,
and Frederick Nance, are fourth cousins, positive or supposed.

It is believed that this will simplify the tracing of relationships.

For example, turn to page twenty-five. Here you see Dorothy
Nance-Burton, limb one. At the close of her life sketch is a list
of her children, or branches. Immediately following, is Clement,
branch one. Following his sketch over the leaf to page tweuty-
six, you see his likeness, and at the close, follow his children,
twigs. Now see the first name or twig, you read William E.
The surname, Burton, is left off as a superfluous repetition. Fol-
lowing the name is a small w, meaniug wife, whose full maiden
name appears on the next line below. The small d following the
w, means the person is dead. In the column to the right are the
buds. In this family there is but one, Sarah C. The h means
husband whose name appears on the line below, Ross Kldon Witt.
Following his name is their address, Clarksville, Iowa. (The
address is given when known.) The next column gives the three
blossoms, all having companions and addresses. The last column
has the fruit, each of these blossoms bearing fruit. Now by
retracing this first family in the book, from Dorothy Nance-
Burton, limb, through branch, twig, bud, and blossom, to Charles
E. Witt, the first fruit in the Memorial, often enough to
thoroughly understand it, you will have no trouble in understand-
ing any table in this volume.

The indexes have been simplified and made more efficient by

the leaving out of all buds, blossoms, and fruits, admitting only

the trunk, limbs, branches, and twigs. It is believed that any

one desiring to trace himself or another, will have little or no

trouble in tracing back to the twig without the use of the book.

This saves the addition of 1,895 names to the index in Part I.

alone, thus avoiding a very cumbersome list. Besides, very many

would be repetitions of names, always confusing in a family index.

Following the names in the index are the letters tr, 1, b, or t,

indicating whether the person is a trunk, limb, branch, or twig.

Following the names in the index are two or more page numbers,

some times. They usually refer to different persons with the

same name.

Cousin, One collaterally related by descent from a common ancestor,
but not a brother or sister. The children of brothers and sisters are first
cousins ; the children of first cousins are second cousins, etc. A first cousin
once removed is a child of one's first cousin ; a first cousin twice removed is



The Nance Memorial. ix

the grandchild of one's first cousin, etc. A second cousin once removed is
the child of one's second cousin, etc. A first cousin once removed is some-
times called a second cousin ; a second cousin, a third cousin, and so on. —
The Standard Dictionary.

The. author has been careful in quoting the above, because of
the confusion on the subject of consanguinity in the minds of a
good many. Indeed the very best and most extensive Memorial
that the author has been permitted to peruse, gives a very differ-
ent definition of the term cousin. It is a mystery where the com-
piler obtained his definition.

The page in the index, after the name, always refers to the
page where the name is found in the table. The life sketch and
the half-tone of the trunks, limbs, and branches, are always found
above their respective tables, while those of the twigs, buds,
and blossoms, are always found below their respective tables.

The chief value of this work, apart from the historical matter,
is centered in the genealogical or family tables. Study them.
Understand them. No attempt has been made to write a life
sketch of each of the more than five thousand names appearing
in this Memorial. Such would be an impossible task, besides it
would not be interesting, if it were possible. An attempt has
been made, however, to write a short sketch of a few of the most
prominent members of each family and generation. In many
instances it has been impossible to get data from which a sketch
could be written. Many families have furnished very meager
information, or none at all. Others have furnished more than
could be used, consequently much interesting matter had to be
dropped or condensed, to keep a proper equipoise between the
various parts of the volume.

As a very large percentage of those named in this Memorial
are members of the religious body calling themselves variously
the Christiau Church, Church of Christ, Disciples of Christ, and
in a few instances Disciples Church, .the author has deemed it
best to use but one term, the first mentioned, and to explain the
same here. He prefers the term, Church of Christ, and indeed
he thinks a very large majority of the congregations have been
legally organized under that name, while at the same time locally
using the term Christian Church.



The Nance Memorial.



CONTENTS.



Nances of the World,



PART



Chapter I., Clement Nance, Trunk,
Chapter II., Dorothy Purton, Limb,
Chapter III., Mosias Nance, Limb,
Chapter IV., Susan Shaw, Limb, .
Chapter V., Mary Shields, Limb,
Chapter VI., William Nance, Limb,
Chapter VII., Nancy Oatman, Limb,
Chapter VIII., Clement Nance, Limb,
Chapter IX., Jane Jordon, Limb,
Chapter X., John Wesley Nance, Limb,
Chapter XI., Elizabeth Richardson, Limb
Chapter XII., James R. Nance, Limb,
Chapter XIII., Giles Nance, Limb,

PART I

Chapter I., Zachariah Nance I.,

Chapter II., David Nance,

Chapter III., William Nance,

Chapter IV., Richard Nance,

Chapter V., John Nance,

James Nance, .
James Nance,

Chapter VI. -| James Nance, .
James Nance,
James H. Nance,
Giles Nance,
Eaton Nance, .
George Nance,
Robert Nance, .
George W. Nance,
Miss Nance Chandler,
William Nantz,
. Archibald J. Nance,



Chapter VII.



PAGE

I



9
. 25

57
. 8i

83
. 125

154
. 183

196
. 200

202
. 226

232



. 243

286

. 303
312

. 321

325

. 3 2 6

327
. 327

327
. 328

328

. 329
329

. 33o
33i

. 331
332



The Nance Memorial.



XI



ILLUSTRATIONS.



PART I.



Adkins, Mary Cunningham and Family,
Aylsworth, Elder and Mrs. N. J.
Barrows, Mr. and Mrs. M. T.,
Baxter, Lucy Nance,

" Lynden and Russell,
Brazie, Fred E.,
Bullington, Mary Long, .
Burlington, Dr. J. C,
Burton, Charles W.,
Clement,

" Josephus,
Carman, Dr. and Mrs. Isaac,
Causey, Media Jennings,
Claggett, Josephine and Louise,
Cook, Prof. D. J.,

11 James H.,

" Samuel,
Craig, Elizabeth Graham,
Crane, Charles E.,

" Charles L.,

•■ Mary Lizzie
Dewees, Mr. and Mrs. Ira A.,
Gates, Lulu Tyler,
Harber Brothers,

" Martha Nance,
. Hunt, Florence Carman, group,
In pian, Versa lia Nantz, .
Kingery, Rev. David,
Kintner, Elizabeth Shields,
Kistler, Carrie Oatman,
McCrae, Rev. John,
McKinney, Carrie Snider,
Mitchell, Susan Long

44 William,

Moore, Catharine Nance,
Myers, Lucretia Wright,
Nance, Albiuus,

11 Brothers, group,



PAGK

37
162
170

64
68

67
220
222

35
26

46

39
224

217

41

42

40

122

"5
117

116

153

55
192

191

33
230
106
120
181

96
190
225

30

65

45

141

146



Xll



The Nance Memorial.







t<



Nance, Charles H.,

44 Mr. and Mrs. Clement,

44 Mr. and Mrs. David, . .

44 Mr. and Mrs. Francis M.,

44 George W.,

44 Mrs. George W.,

44 Dr. Henry H.,

44 Dr. and Mrs. Hiram,

44 Er. and Mrs. H. Irving, .

44 James D..

44 Marie E., .

Martha Chamberlain,
Olive L., .
Richard R.,
Richard W.,
Roswell S.,
44 Dr. and Mrs. Roy, ,

44 Mr. and Mrs. William,
44 Dr. Willis O.,
Nantz, Mr. and Mrs. Orville R.,
Nunemacher, Avesta Shields,
Oatman, Elder John,

44 Mr. and Mrs. Jesse,

44 Mr. and Mrs. Pleasant S.,

Rardin, Belle Burton,
Reed, Carrie E., .

44 Elizabeth Burton, .
Richardson, Aaron,
44 Aaron A.,

44 Elizabeth Nance,

44 James H ,

44 Mr. and Mrs. James M.

44 Mary Nance,

44 Russell A. and Family,

Rev. W. F.,
Routh, Henry H., . \

Shields, Rev. and Mrs. E. P.,
44 Mr. and Mrs. Henry B.,
44 Mary Nance,
Smith, Clarence W. and Raymond J
Snider, Jane Nance,
Tyler, Rev. B. B.,
Van Nest, Hattie Harl>er,
Ward, Franklin A.,
Warren, Sarah Nance,
Washburn, Ida Burton,

Carleton E., .
Carrie E.,



PACK

I50
128

62

Frontier Piece
76

134
138

144
78

M3

1*3
75

142

130

147

148

125-6

228
116

154

. 167-8

178

3*

48

47

204

216

202

206

211-2

.. 186

214

208

70

100



83

198
187

51

'94
210

66

47
47
47



The Nance Memorial



xiii



PART ll



Addison, Leila Wallace,
Craig, Virginia Nance,
Gum, Matilda, group,

'• Matilda Farm Residence,
Hill, Parthena Nance,
Kilbourn, Dr. and Mrs. G. A.,
Moore, Mary Nance,
Nance, Elder A. J.,

44 Mr. and Mrs. Allen Q.,
M Bethenia H., .
44 . Charles L.,

Mr. and Mrs. David C,

Elizabeth Bingley,

Mr. and Mrs. F. Carey,

Henry W.,

John F.,

John Webb,

Joshua,

Joshua Old Home,

Elder and Mrs. Josiah C,

Josiah W.,

McHenry,

Milton D.,



<<
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ii

ti
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•i
ii



ti



ii



Neva,



Mr. and Mrs. Otway Bird

Ross A.,

Roy C,

Sevignia E., .

Spotswood A. and Son,

Washington J.,

William, .

Zachariah Henry,
Owen, Josiah W. and Eugenia S.,

44 Elder and Mrs. Wm. B.,
Rural Vale,
Shipley, Mr. and Mrs. C. W.,



•i
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it
it
ii
ii
ii



PAGE
292
26l

257
25S

28 r
264
261

307
274
301
253
275-6
244
249
256

315

323

26S

255

297

300
316

253
254
263
252
250
250

317
262
300

259
299

29S

294
251



xiv The Nance Memorial.



PATRIOTISM.



On the pages of this Memorial are expressions from some of
those of the south land, concerning the issues of the days of the
civil war of 1861-5, not always complimentary to the people of
the north. The author, as well as hundreds whose names appear
in this Memorial, was in the conflict on the side for the preserva-
tion of the Union. There were other hundreds on the side of the
Confederacy. The author has studiously avoided these questions
himself while allowing others full right to express themselves in
their own way.

The author's sentiments on these matters are found only on
this page. First, he is not conscious of now having, or ever hav-
ing had any prejudice for or against the people of the south.
Second, he believes the intelligent people, both north and south,
are now convinced that the race problem is not settled as yet.
Third, he believes that no one at all intelligent is sorry we have
one united country to-day ; that we of the north can cross the Ohio
river into Louisville, and the people of the south can cross the
same river into Cincinnati, to do our shopping without having to
pay duty on our purchases, and having our luggage inspected by
government officials every time we cross the line. Fourth, he
has asked cousin Joanna Shields- Warren, of Louisville, to express
in rhyme an up-to-date sentiment on these issues, as a kind of
antidote to some expressions that may appear to some as hardly
present day sentiment. She responds as follows :



The Nance Memorial. xv



The Blue and the Gray.

They waged the battle together,

They fought in deadly strife ;
'Twas but the soul's appealing

For a principle dearer than life.

The ties of blood and of birthright

Were ignored, forgot in the fray,
And the one impelling impulse

Guided each in this fatal way.

The South was dear to its people,

And just as dear, the to-day,
And to see her crushed and wounded,

Was a something to grieve alway.

Each were right, and God will judge them

With a judgment higher than man ;
He knows what made these differences,

Not alike, and yet not to blame.

One family, each child with its impulse,
Some stronger, and others more true,

What caused the wild rush of feeling
To differ, none living can know.

But now that the war is long ended,
And years have both come and gone,

The brother — hood feel — the God man

Rules again, and there's peace in the home.

The feeling of hatred, — resentment —

Is softened — and wrongs endured —
Are left in the past, but remembered

Though unspoken, and the wounds scarce cured.

In the Grand Lodge of Heaven,

The Blue and the Gray
Will meet and clasp hands

By order of the Grand Master above.
All differences healed, all wrongs forgot,

They will aye dwell in unity, peace, and love.



xvi Tim Nancr Mkmorial.



ERRATA.



Page I, line it, for "contest," read "conquest."

" 2», " 29, after "never," insert "had."

*' 77. M 2 5i between "the" and "more," insert "Lord."

" 109," 15, for "John," read "Hugh."

" 127, " 1, for "limbs," read "branches."

" 140, bud column, for "Zulu," read "Lulu."

" 180, " 5 from bottom, for "developed," read "devolved."

" 185, middle of page, for "1839," read "1838."

•• 201, twig column, for "Illinois," read "Indiana."

" 223, twig column, for "Paer, Texas," read "Poer, Texas."

44 255, " 2, for "twigs," read "branches."

" 288, branch column, for "James Dayton," read Jas. Drayton,"

" 302, " 6, erase the word "intestate."

11 303, " 6 from bottom, for "road," read "rope."

" 292, under the half-tone, "Addison," should be affixed to "Wallace."

There are other typographical errors but they do not mar the meaning,
and they will be easily detected.

The reader will please turn at once to the errors indicated above and
with fine pen and ink, make the corrections.



THE NANCES OF THE WORLD.



THE earliest mention of the name Nance as applied to a
family, that the author has found, is in a communication
from Padstow, Cornwall, England, written by Elijah
Nance to W. E. Nance, Esq., of Cardiff, Wales. (See Appendix,
Exhibit "A".) This letter was written in 1856, and covers, as
it says, 790 years from 1066, when William the Conqueror in one
battle at Hastings, killed the King and took possession of all
England and Wales. This army had crossed from Normandy, in
France. The whole of Eugland and Wales was confiscated and
became the possessions of the Conqueror and his army.

Under the heading, "The Norman Contest of England," in
Johnson's Universal Cyclopaedia, is the following, viz :

Domesday Book, William's famous property-survey, divides the land
into 60,215 knight-fees, 28,015 of which are in the hands of the church, each
l>eing pledged to knight (or eouivolent foot) service and to all precedental
feudal taxes and tributes, liable also to escheat and forfeiture. These feoffs
or fees are held from the Crown ( 1 ) by a score or so of great secular vassals,
magnates of Normandy, leaders of the conquoring army invested with large
but scattering complexes ; (2) by several hundred lesser chief-tenants or



Online LibraryGeorge Washington NanceThe Nance memorial; a history of the Nance family in general; but more particularly of Clement Nance, of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, and descendants, containing historical and biographical records with family lineage → online text (page 1 of 27)