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Birds of the Pacific slope of Southern California online

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and return in April, but a few winter at least as far north as Ventura County.
Breeds mostly in June. ' J. G. Cooper took a specimen in the Cajon Pass, San
Bernardino County, December 7, 1860 (Am. Nat. in, 1870, 185), and. accord-
ing to E. C. Thurber, a small flock passed the winter of 1895-6 in the Santa



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92 PACIFIC COAST AVIFAUNA No. 7

Ana River bottom near San Bernardino (Auk xiii, 1896, 265). L. H. Miller
saw a male at Riverside, December 2, 1911. H. S. Swarth has noted Phain-
opeplas in Westlake Park, Los Angeles, on several occasions in mid-winter and
saw one bird near Los Angeles, March 12, 1899. J. S. Appleton has noted the
species on several occasions during the winter months in the Simi Valley, V^en-
tura County. I saw a bird in this locality, F'ebruary 25, 1912, and the fol-
lowing day I took a male in the same vicinity. Its testes were much enlarged
and it would undoubtedly have bred within a short time. Extreme nesting
dates for Los Angeles County are: Two slightly incubated eggs taken by
H. A. Gaylord near Pasadena, May 4, 1897, and two fresh eggs taken by Mr.
Gaylord in the same locality, July 28, 1894 (Grinnell, Pub. 2, Pasadena Acad.
Sci., 1898, 43). J. S. Appleton took a set of eggs in the Simi Valley, Ventura
County, in late March.

310. (622b) Lanius ludovicianus gambeli Ridgway. California Shrikk.
Abundant resident from the coast to the base of the mountains. Breeds

mostly from late March to the latter part of May. Extreme nesting dates are:
Five eggs, fresh, taken by H. J. Lelande near Pasadena, February 14, 1897
(Grinnell, Pub. 2, Pasadena Acad. Sci., 1898, 43), and four eggs, incubation
advanced, taken by W. M. Pierce near Claremont, Los Angeles County, July
5, 1903.

The shrikes that occur along the southeastern border of the coastal slope
of southern California are variously intermediate between this form and L. /.
cxcubitorides, some specimens approaching the latter very closely.

311. (622c) Lanius ludovicianus anthonyi Mearns. Island Shrike.
This insular form, described from specimens taken by R. H. Beck on Santa

Cruz Island in May, 1897 (Auk xv, 1898, 261), is a fairly common resident on
Santa Cruz Island where it is found mostly around the ranch houses and culti-
vated lands. It is resident on San Clemente Island but is less plentiful than on
Santa Cruz. It is found on Santa Rosa Island but I have no information as to its
abundance. One bird was seen there by H. J. Lelande and O. W. Howard, June
8, 1910. H. Robertson and V. W. Owen saw a pair of these birds and found a
nest containing young, on Anacapa Island, June 4, 1899, but when I visited this
island in June, 1910, none were seen. It is resident on Catalina Island in small
numbers.

R. H. Beck took four sets of eggs on Santa Cruz Island, May 6 to 11, 1897
(Mearns, Auk xv, 1898, 264), and J. Mailliard took two sets of eggs and found
several nests in course of construction on the same island in late April, 1898
(Bull. Cooper Orn. Club, i, 1899, 41). C. B. Linton noted the following nests on
San Clemente Island in March, 1907. One downy young and two infertile eggs.
March 8; five eggs, two-thirds incubated, March 7; and five eggs, fresh, March
19 (Condor x, 1908, 85). J. Grinnell took five slightly incubated eggs on the
same island, April 2, 1897 (Pub. 1, Pasadena Acad. Sci., 1897, 19). R. M. Perez
took five fresh eggs on Catalina Island, April 15, 1911.

312 (627a) Vircosylva gilva swainsoni (Baird). Western Warbling

ViREO.



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1912 BIRDS OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 93

Common summer resident, locally, from the base of the mountains up to
about 8500 feet in the cafions. Common migrant over the lower country. Breeds
mostly in May and June. J. Grinnell has noted this bird near Pasadena as early
as March 23 (1895) (Pub. 2, Pasadena Acad. Sci., 1898, 43), and H. S. Swarth
took a female near Los Angeles, October 4, 1901. H. A. Gaylord took three
slightly incubated eggs near Pasadana, May 9, 1894, and J. Grinnell took three
fresh eggs on Pine Flats, 6000 feet altitude in the San Gabriel Range, July 2, 1897
(Pub. 2, Pasadana Acad. Sci., 1898, 43). F. E. Blaisdell took a nest and eggs
at Poway, San Diego County, June 11, 1883 (Belding, Land Bds. Pac. Dist.,
1890,199).

313. (629a) Lanivireo solitarius cassini (Xantus). Cassin Vireo.
Common along the foothills and on the mesas during migrations, which occur

in April and in late September and early October. Breeds numerously in the
mountain canons from the foothills up to about 7000 feet, nesting in cottonwoods
and white oaks in May and June. Noted by H. S. Swarth migrating near Los
Angtles, the first in the spring, April 3 (1901), the last in the fall, October 13
(1898). Found common in summer by J. R. Pemberton in Matilija Canon, Rincon
Creek and other localities in the coast range of Ventura County (Condor xii,
1910, 18). Extreme nesting records by J. Grinnell are: F*ive eggs, incubation
advanced, taken near Pasadena, May 11, 1895, and three eggs, incubation slight,
taken in the same locality, June 26, 1893 (Pub. 2, Pasadena Acad. Sci., 1898, 44).

314. (632) Virco huttoni huttoni Cassin. Hutton Vireo.

Common resident of the foothill and mesa regions, also the larger islands of
the Santa Barbara group. Fairly plentiful over the lower country in winter.
Breecfs, ordinarily, from early April through May. Extreme nesting records are :
Three eggs, fresh, taken by J. Grinnell near Pasadena, March 7, 1896 (Pub. 2,
Pasadena Acad. Sci., 1898, 44), and four eggs, fresh, taken by H. A. Gaylord in
the same locality, July IS, 1894 (Avifauna i, 1895, 17).

315. (633a) Virco belli pusillus Coues. Least Vireo.

Common in summer in the willow regions from the coast to the foothills.
Arrives in late March and early April and leaves mostly during the latter part of
August. Breeds generally in the latter part of May. Noted by H. Robertson
near Los Angeles as early as March 11 (1900). and by J. Grinnell at Pasadena
as late as September 8 (1897) (Pub. 2, Pasadena Acad. Sci., 1898, 44). Ex-
treme nesting records by H. Robertson near Los Angeles are: Three newly
hatched young found April L 1900, and set of three eggs taken June 20, 1898.

316. (634) Vireo vicinior Coues. Gr.w Vireo.

Fairly common summer resident of the foothills from San Diego County
north along the San Jacinto and San Bernardino ranges to Cajon Pass, San
Bernardino County. Found by F. Stephens to he not uncommon in the Cajon
Pass. June 4 and 5, and July 1, 1886. A nest found on June 4 contained four
slightly incubated eggs. The nest was built in the chaparral about four feet from
the ground (Morcom, Bull. Ridg. Orn. Club. No. 2, 1887, 51). Mr. Stephens
also took a nest and four eggs about ten miles east of Riverside, April 26, 1889



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94 PACIFIC COAST AVIFAUNA No. 7

(Auk VII, 1890, 159). Mr. Stephens states that the species is not uncommon in
summer at Campo and Julian, San Diego County, from the lower limit of pines
down to about 3(X)0 feet altitude. In 1876 he noted its first appearance at Campo
about March 24 (Bull. Nutt. Orn. Club iii. 1878, 42).

317. (636) Mniotilta varia (Linnaeus). Black and White Warbler.
One record, that of an immature female taken by H. A. Gaylord in the

Arroyo Seco, near Pasadena, October 2, 1895 (Nidologist iii, 1896, 106). Now
no. 5022 collection F. S. Daggett.

318. (645a) Vcrmivora rubricapilla gutturalis (Ridgway). Calaveras
Warbler.

Common spring and fall migrant from the lowlands up to at least 9800 feet
in the mountains. Noted by J. Grinnell in spring in the vicinity of Pasadena as
early as April 4 (1896) (Pub. 2, Pasadena Acad. Sci., 1898, 44), and found by
H. S. Swarth to be fairly common near Los Angeles May 3 to 7 and May 12,
1900. Also noted by Mr. Swarth near Los Angeles in the fall from September
. 13 (1897) to October 8 (1896) (Grinnell, Pub. 2, Pasadena Acad. Sci., 1898, 44).
According to J. Grinnell, this species makes its appearance in the San Bernardino
Mountains, in the fall, during the latter part of August. The first noted were at
Cactus Flat, 6(XX) feet, August 17, 1905. They were common among the tama-
rack pines on the summit of Sugarloaf, 98(X) feet, August 19, and at Bluff Lake,
7500 feet, from August 30 to September 3, the species was fairly common in the
willow thickets (Univ. Calif. Publ. Zool. v, 1908, 110).

319. (646) Vcrmivora celata celata (Say). Orange-crowned Warbler.
Probably a regular migrant in small numbers. Most common in the fall.

Occasional in winter as far north as Riverside. Specimens taken as follows :
Male by J. Grinnell at Pasadena, September 3, 1896 (Swarth, Condor in, 1901,
145). Several specimens by H. S. Swarth near Los Angeles, in the fall from
September 17 (1900) to October 30 (1899) (Condor in, 1901, 17). Two females
by J. E. Law in the San Fernando Valley, Los Angeles County, April 15 and 22,
1905, and a female by H. W. Marsden at Witch Creek, San Diego County, April
24, 1909. One winter record, that of a male taken by F. O. Johnson at Riverside,
December 25, 1888 (Swarth, Condor xii, 1910, 108).

320. (646a) Vcrmivora celata lutescens (Ridgway). Lutescent
Warbler.

Common spring and fall migrant from the coast to at least 9800 feet in the
mountains. A few remain through the summer and breed in the canons and on
brushy mountain sides. Migrations occur mainly in September and March. Ac-
cording to W. Brewster, winters as far north as San Diego ( Bull. Mus. Comp.
Zool. Harv. Coll. xli, 1902, 179). May occasionally winter even farther north,
as H. S. Swarth took a specimen near Los Angeles, November 20, 1901, and took
several in the same locality, February 21, 1904. J. H. Bowles records it as a
common summer resident near Santa Barbara. He has found it nesting not more
than two miles from the ocean and at an elevation of less than 400 feet (Auk
XXVIII, 1911, 177). J. E. Law took four half-incubated eggs near Lankershim,



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1912 BIRDS OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 95

Los Angeles County, April 23, 1905, and in April, 1902, I found it breeding com-
monly in a canon near Monrovia, the same county. I took three slightly incubated
eggs April 27 , and another set of three, also slightly incubated, April 29. I have
been unable to find it nesting in this locality since 1902, although I have searched
for it on several occasions, so it is probably irregular in its nesting localities.

321. (646b) Vermivora cclata sordida (C. H. Tov^nsend). Dusky
Warbler.

Common summer resident on the larger islands of the Santa Barbara group
and on the mainland coast in the vicinity of San Diego. A few winter on the
islands but the majority migrate to the mainland, where they may be found from
the middle of July until April, in the willow thickets of the lowlands and the oak
regions of the mesas. The type of this sub-species was taken by C. H. Townsend
on San Clemente Island, January 25, 1890 (Proc. U. S. Nat. Mus. xiii, 1890,
139). It is most abundant on the islands of Santa Catalina, San Clemente and
Santa Cruz. On the latter island. C. B. Linton and myself found it fairly com-
mon in November and December, 1907.

O. W, Howard found several nests containing eggs and young on Catalina
Island in April and May, 1905 (Warbler, ser. 2, ii, 1906, 9), and R. M. Perez
took several sets on the same island in late April, 1911. Mr. Howard also took
four slightly incubated eggs on Santa Cruz Island, April 27, 1906, and H. J. Le-
lande took four slightly incubated eggs on Anacapa Island, April 6, the same year.
A. M. Ingersoll informs me that the Dusky Warbler breeds plentifully at Point
Loma and Coronado Beach, near San Diego. He has found at least a dozen nests
in these localities, all of which were within a mile of the salt water.

Z22. (647) Vermivora peregrina (Wilson). Tennessee Warbler.

One record, that of an immature female taken by J. Grinnell in the Arroyo
Seco, near Pasadena, September 27, 1897 (Pub. 2, Pasadena Acad. Sci., 1898,
45). Now no. 3177 collection J. Grinnell.

323. (652b) Dendroica aestiva rubiginosa (Pallas), f Al.aska Yellow
Warbler.

Occasional in migrations. E. A. Mearns took three specimens at Mountain
Springs, San Diego County, May 11, 1894 (Oberholser, Auk xiv, 1897, 78).
This locality is on the desert side of the mountains, about half way up the eastern
slope. H. W. Marsden took specimens at Witch Creek, San Diego County, dur-
ing 1904, as follows: Female, May 3: male. May 6: male. May 11, and male,
October 12 (Bishop, Condor vii. 1905, 143). Now nos. 10901, 10902, 10903,
11811 collection L. R. Bishop.

324. (652c) Dendroica aestiva brewsteri Grinnell. Californl\ Yellow
Warbler.

Common summer resident in wooded localities, especially along streams,
from the lowlands up to at least 5200 feet in the mountain cafions. Occurs at
much higher altitudes during the fall migration. Breeds mostly in late May and
early June. Noted by H. S. Swarth near Los Angeles from April 1 (1899) to
October 14 (1901). Extreme nesting dates are: Four eggs, fresh, taken by



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% PACIFIC COAST AVIFAUNA No. 7

Antonin Jay near Compton, Los Angeles County, May 5, 1895, and three eggs,
fresh, taken by J. Grinnell near Pasadena, June 26, 1893 (Pub. 2, Pasadena Aca 1.
Sci., 1898,44).

325. (655) Dcndroica coronata (Linnaeus). Myrtle Warbler.
Common winter visitant. South at least to Los Angeles County and San

Clemente Island. Noted by H. S. Swarth in the vicinity of Los Angeles, from
November 13 (1896) to March 1 (1901). J. Grinnell took an adult female on
Santa Barbara Island, May 15, 1897 (Pub. 1, Pasadena Acad. Sci., 1897, 7), and
C. B. Linton found the species fairly common in winter on San Clemente (Condor
XI, 1909, 194).

326. (656) Dcndroica auduboni auduboni (J. K. Townsend). Audubon
Warbler.

Summer resident from 4000 to more than 10,000 feet altitude in the
mountains. Breeds mostly in June. Very abundant and g^enerally distributed
throughout the lowlands in winter. Appears in the lower country about the first
week in September and remains well into April. J. Grinnell found a nest con-
taining three eggs at about 4000 feet altitude in the San Bernardino Mountains,
June 21, 1905, and took four fresh eggs at Dry Lake, 9000 feet altitude, June 14,
1906 (Univ. Calif. Publ. Zool. v, 1908, 112-114).

327. (657). Dcndroica magnolia (Wilson). Magnolia Warbler.
Rare migrant. Male taken by J. Grinnell on Santa Barbara Island, May 15,

1897 (Pub. 1, Pasadena Acad. Sci., 1897, 7). Immature female taken by H. S.
Swarth near Los Angeles, October 21, 1897 (Grinnell, Pub. 2, Pasadena Acad.
Sci., 1898. 45), and another immature female, taken by Mr. Swarth in the same
locality, October 5, 1901 (Condor in, 1901, 145). So far as I know, these are
our only records.

328. (665) Dendroica nigrescens (J. K. Townsend). Black-throated
Gray Warbler.

Common summer resident of the mountains, from the foothills up to at least
6000 feet. Occurs in considerable numbers on the mesas and lowlands during
migrations. Spring migration, late March and the month of April ; fall migra-
tion, late September and the month of October. Earliest in the spring in Los
Angeles County: male taken by J. Grinnell near Pasadena, March 23, 1895 (Pub.
2, Pasadena Acad. Sci., 1898, 46). Latest. in the fall: female taken by H. S.
Swarth near Los Angeles, October 30, 1899 (Condor ii. 1900, 91). J. G. Cooper
noted the species in spring migration at San Diego, April 20, 1862 (Land Bds.
Cal, 1870, 91), and L. Belding took a male in the same locality, May 3, 1885
(Land Bds. Pac. Dist., 1890, 212). In June, 1909, J. R. Pemberton saw this bird
frequently along Rincon Creek, Ventura County, from Stanley Park, elevation
400 feet, to the summit of the Santa Ynez Mountains, 4900 feet. A nest contain-
ing young was found at the summit on June 23 (Condor xii. 1910, 18). Ex-
treme nesting records are : Nest containing three small young, noted by J. Grin-
nell in the mountains north of Pasadena, May 19, 1895 ; and three eggs, consider-
ably incubated, taken by R. Arnold in the same locality. June 26, 18% (Pub. 2,
Pasadena Acad. Sci.. 1898, 46).



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1912 BIRDS OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 97

329. (668) Dendroica townsendi (J. K. Townsend). Townsend War-
bler.

Fairly common migrant, occasionally remaining through the winter. Spring
migration, April and early May;. fall migration, October and early November.
H. S. Swarth has noted the species frequently during migrations in the vicinity
of Los Angeles. He took a male in the Arroyo Seco, near Pasadena, as late as
May 18 (1899). He also took a female in Santa Monica Canon, Los Angeles
County, December 21, 1900, and another female in the Cahuenga Hills, February
14, 1902. J. Grinnell found the birds fairly common near Pasadena from April
22 to May 13, 1897, and took one specimen in the same locality, October 7, 189.S.
He also saw several birds on Mt. Wilson, December 12, 1896, and took a speci-
men in that locality, January IT, 1894 (Pub. 2, Pasadena Acad. Sci., 1898, 46).
W. P. Taylor found it common at Pasadena during January, 1909 (Condor xi,
1909,69).

F. O. Johnson took a specimen at Riverside, December 31, 1888 (Swarth,
Condor xii, 1910, 108). N. S. Goss noted it at Julian, San Diego County, April
17, 1884, and L. Belding took a male near San Diego, April 20, the same year
(Land Bds. Pac. Dist., 1890, 213). F. Stephens found it in small numbers at
Campo, San Diego County, April 27, 1877 (Bull. Nutt. Orn. Club viii, 1883, 188),
and, according to J. G. Cooper, small flocks arrived at San Diego about April 20,
1862 (Land Bds. Cal., 1870, 92). J. Grinnell and H. A. Gaylord took two females
on Santa Barbara Island, May 15, 1897 (Pub. 1, Pasadena Acad. Sci., 1897, 7),
and C. B. Linton took a specimen on San Clemente in December, 1908 (Condor
XI, 1909, 194).

330. (669) Dendroica occidentalis (J. K. Townsend). Hermit Warbler.
Fairly common migrant, though irregularly so. Most plentiful in spring.

Noted by J. Grinnell at Pasadena from April 22 to May 17, and one bird seen by
H. S. Swarth near Los Angeles, September 10, 1897 (Pub. 2, Pasadena Acad.
Sci., 1898, 46). Mr. Swarth has also noted it in the spring near Los Angeles
from April 17 (1904) to May 16 (1900). He also saw one or two birds on Mt.
Wilson, May 20, 1898. G. F. Morcom took a female near Redondo, Los Angeles
County, May 10, 1901. J. Grinnell took an adult male at Bluff Lake, 7500 feet
altitude in the San Bernardino Mountains, September 3, 1905 (Univ. Calif. Publ.
Zool. v, 1908, 115), and H. E. Wilder saw a flock at Little Bear Valley in late
July, 1910. It was noted commonly in migration at Campo, San Diego County,
by F Stephens, April 27, 1877 (Bull. Nutt. Orn. Club, viii, 1883, 188). N. S.
Goss found it plentiful at Julian, San Diego County, April 25, 1884, and L. Beld-
ing saw three or four birds at Tia Juana, on the Mexican boundary, April 30
and May 2, 1885 (Land Bds. Pac. Dist., 1890, 215). During the last week in
April, 1872, J. G. Cooper found it quite common in company with the two pre-
ceding species, in the Cuyamaca Mountains, San Diego County, between 1500
and 4000 feet altitude (Baird, Br. & Ridg., N. Am. Land Bds. in. 1874, 506). H.
A. Gaylord took a female on Santa Barbara Island, May 14, 1897, and saw several
more the same day (Grinnell, Pub. 1, Pasadena Acad. Sci., 1897, 7).

331. (675a) Seiurus noveboracensis notabilis Ridgway. Grinnei.i
Water-Thrush.



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98 PACIFIC COAST AVIFAUNA No. 7

Rare migrant. So far noted only in the fall, as follows : Bird of the year
taken by J. Grinnell at Cactus Flat, 6000 feet altitude on the desert slope of the
San Bernardino Mountains, August 16, 1905 (Condor ix, 1907, 60). NTow no.
7157 collection J. Grinnell. Female taken by C. J^. Linton near National City, San
Diego County, September 29, 1906 (Condor ix, 1907, 60). Now no. 16661 col-
lection J. E. Thayer. Specimen picked up dead under an electric light mast in
the business section of San Diego, September 11. 1887, and presented to the late
WMter Bryant by A. M. Ingersoll (Keeler, Zoe i, 1891, 371).

332. (680) Oporomis tolmiei (J. K. Townsend). Macgillivray War-
bler.

Common migrant from the foothills to at least 8500 feet in the mountains.
Occasional to the lower country, mostly during the fall migration. Noted in
spring in the vicinity of Pasadena by J. Grinnell as early as April 4 (1896),
and by H. A. Gaylord as late as May 13 (1896). Noted in the fall by H. S.
Swarth near Los Angeles from September 4 (1897) (Grinnell, Pub. 2, Pasa-
dena Acad. Sci., 1898, 46) to October 24 (1899) (Condor ii, 1900, 91). Mr.
Swarth also saw a female near Los Angeles, June 4, 1898, and J. E. Law took a
male near Pomona, May 22, 1901. J. Grinnell found the species common in the
San Bernardino Mountains, from 7500 to 8500 feet altitude, from August 19 to
September 3, 1905 (Univ. Calif. Publ. Zool. v, 190& 116). F. E. Blaisdell noted
it in spring at Poway, San Diego County, from March 28 (1885) to the middle
of May (1884) (Belding, Land Bds. Pac. Dist., 1890, 216).

333. (681c) Geothlypis trichas arizela Oberholser. Pacific Yellow-
throat.

Common resident of the marshes and damp meadow lands, from the coast to
the base of the mountains. Breeds mainly in April and May. Extreme nesting
dates are: Four eggs, fresh, taken by H. J. Lelande near Pasadena, April 7,
1897 (Grinnell, Pub. 2, Pasadena Acad. Sci., 1898, 46), and three eggs, fresh,
taken by Antonin Jay at Nigger Slough, Los Angeles County, July 9, 1905.

334. (683a) Icteria virens longicauda Lawrence. Long-tailed Chat.
Common summer resident in the willow regions of the lowlands. Occurs in

small numbers along the foothills during migrations. Arrives in April and leaves
mostly in September. Breeds most plentifully in late May and early June. W. M.
Pierce saw this species in San Antonio Caiion, Los Angeles County, April 1, 19(X),
and H. S. Swarth took an immature female at Los Angeles, October 7, 1897. Ex-
treme nesting records are : Three eggs taken by H. Robertson near Los Angeles,
May 4, 1898, and three eggs, also taken by Mr. Robertson, in the same locality,
June 25, the same year.

335. (685a) Wilsonia pusilla pileolata (Pallas). Pileolated Warbler.
Occasional in migrations. The following specimens of this form, all taken at

Pasadena, are in the collection of F. S. Daggett: Male taken April 29, 1897;
female taken May 1, 1896, and female taken September 22^ 1896 (Grinnell, Con-
dor V, 1903, 80). J. Grinnell took five specimens on Santa Barbara Island, May
14-16, 1897 (Pub. 1, Pasadena Acad. Sci., 1897, 8).



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1912 BIRDS OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 99

336. (685b) Wilsonia pusilla chryscola Ridgway. Golden Pileolated
Warbler.

Abundant summer resident from the lowlands to at least 850Q feet in the
mountains. Rare in winter. Breeds commonly in the willow regions in May,
later in the mountains. Noted by J. Grinnell near El Monte, Los Angeles
County, from February 16 (1895) to October 27 (1894) (Pub. 2, Pasadena
Acad. Sci., 1898, 47). H. S. Swarth saw a bird near Los Angeles, at least
once a week from November 11, 1899, until the end of February, 1900 (Condor
II, 1900, 31). J. Grinnell found the species common and apparently breed-
ing, in willow thickets at the head of the south fork of the Santa Ana River,
8000 to 8500 feet altitude in the San Bernardino Mountains, June 27 to 30,
1905 (Univ. Calif. Publ. Zool. v, 1908, 34). Extreme nesting dates in the
lower country are as follows: Four eggs, fresh, taken by Antonin Jay near
El Monte, Los Angeles County, April 21, 1907, and three eggs, incubation
slight, taken by J. J. Schneider near Anaheim, Orange County, July 2, 1899
(Condor ii, 1900, 34).

337. (687) Setophaga ruticilla (Linnaeus). Redstart.

One record, that of a female found dead near Pasadena by P. L Osburn,
December 27, 1905 (Condor xi, 1909, 102).

338. (697) Anthus rubcscens (Tunstall). Pipit.

Abundant winter visitant. Often seen in large flocks on ploughed fields
and pasture lands. Noted by J. Grinnell near Pasadena as early as August
29 (1895) (Pub. 2, Pasadena Acad. Sci., 1898, 47), and by L. Belding at San
Diego as late as April 23 (1884) (Land Bds. Pac. Dist., 1890, 223). One
bird seen by H. S. Swarth at Los Angeles, May 1, 1899 (Condor ii, 1900, 40).

339. (701) Cinclus mexicanus unicolor Bonaparte. Dipper.

Breeds along mountain- streams from 2000 to 9000 feet aUitude. In winter
follows the streams down as low as the foothills. Breeds mostly in late April
and the first part of May. According to L. Belding does not occur in San
Diego County, owing to the absence of suitable streams. R. Arnold took four


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