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Memoirs of John Selden : and notices of the political contest during his time online

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after selecting some of the books, and offering them to the
benchers of the Inner Temple as the foundation of a
law library, presented the remainder, together with his
museum, to the University of Oxford. Eventually, the
benchers slighting the offer, and delaying to provide a
depository for the books, the whole, comprising more than
eight thousand volumes, were conveyed to the university,
one of the terms enforced by the executors being, that
they should be for ever kept together, and in a distinct
body, with the title of " Mr. Selden's Library." They
are preserved in a separate apartment of the Bodleian
library. Anthony Wood has recorded that the books
arrived at the university in September 1659, and that he
with the head librarian, and several assistants, were
employed some weeks in sorting and arranging them. In
opening some of the books they found several pairs of
spectacles, which Selden must have put in and forgotten
where he had placed them.

In the previous June Selden's antique marbles
had arrived, and they were finally arranged in one of
the schools, each specimen being marked with his
initial *.

'* Wood's Autobiography.



JOHN SELDEN, 359

A work entitled " De Nummis," was published in
1675, and is stated in the title-page to have been written
by Selden. This is a literary fraud. It was written by
Alexander Sardus, and published five years before Selden's
birth, and was reprinted at Frankfort, in 1609, as well as
in the eleventh volume of Graevius's Thesaurus Antiqui-
tatum Romanorum. The edition under Selden's name
differs only in the titlepage and dedication *.

In 1689 appeared Selden's " Table-Talk," from which
so many quotations have been made in preceding pages.
Its editor was the Rev. Richard Milward, who for many
years was Selden's amanuensis, and consequently had the
most favourable opportunities of becoming acquainted
with the sentiments and opinions which he has recorded!.
A note made by the Earl of Oxford on a manuscript copy
of this work states, " this book was given in 168 — by
Charles Earl of Dorset, to a bookseller, in Fleet-street, in
order to have it printed, but the bookseller delaying to
have it done, Mr. Thomas Rymer sold a copy he procured
to Mr. Churchill, who printed itt." The authors of the
Leipsic " Acts of the Learned," gave a decided opinion
against the genuineness of this work, because they con-
sidered that it contains sentiments contrary to those

* Wood's Athenre Oxon., iii. 373.

t Mr. Milward was of Trinity College, Cambridge, rector of Little
Braxted, in Essex, upon the presentation of its then patron, the Earl
of Pembroke ; and installed a canon of Windsor in 1G66. lie died in
1680. (Newcourt's Repertorium. Kenet's Catalogue.)

X Harleian MSS. 1315. pi. 42 b.



3G0 MEMOIllS OF

recorded in Selden's works, and others that are not
worthy of him. Dr. Wilkins and others have coincided
in this condemnation. That it contains many obser-
vations which, being made in the prompt onflow of
conversation, Mr. Milward would have done better not to
have registered, cannot be denied, but that the work is at
issue with Selden's more considerately delivered opinions
has never been demonstrated. That as a whole it is
unworthy of Selden is denied by the public approbation
bestowed upon it. It has passed through numerous
editions, and indeed may be considered as one of the Eng-
lish classics. A better critic than those of Leipsic, Dr.
Johnson, entirely dissents from them, for replying to an
observation made by Mr. Boswell in praise of the French
Ana, he said, " a few of them are good, but we have one
book of that kind better than any of them — Selden's
Table-Talk *."

Selden adopted for his motto, Trepl navros r^v eXevQepiav,

liberty concerning all things f. His life was one con-
sistent comment upon that text, a text to which no
good man will object, and which only the bad will abuse
by misconstruction. In social life we have seen that he
encouraged an innocent freedom from icy formality in the
observance of rules which were made to protect and not
to enslave social intercourse.

* Boswell's Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides, 321.
■\ He inscribed this in all his books, as may be seen by referring to
those in the Bodleian,



JOHN SELDEN. 361

As a citizen, whilst he supported the government of the
state, he as strenuously opposed the abuses of its power.
For, although he perfectly understood the necessity of
sacrificing in society some part of our individual freedom,
for the security of the remainder, he as entirely perceived
that the protecting power we create is not to be implicitly
submitted to when it oppresses rather than preserves.

In religion he exercised the same freedom. His
opinions relative to ecclesiastical discipline have already
been noticed. They were those of common sense.
Coming to the inquiry unshackled by prejudice, without
any temporal interests to support, intimate with the first
authorities and particularly attached to the study of the
Scriptures, — Selden was one of the most unexceptionable
judges of the truth of Christianity, and, as already noticed,
we have the satisfaction to know that he declared in its
favour.

Without professing, that we know, any particular creed,
(and who will say that Luther, or Calvin, should bind
such men as Selden, Newton, Grotius, Boyle, and Locke,
to every tenet of their belief?) he lived and died as might
be expected of one who derived his Christianity from the
Bible. Aubrey has a tale that Mr. Hobbes succeeded in
persuading Selden to decline in his last moments the
attendance of a clergyman, and hence his infidelity has
been asserted. However, we have more certain testimony
than that of Aubrey, that Selden was a firm believer.
Besides the authorities quoted at p. 29H, \vc may refer (o



362 MEMOIRS OF

the words of his contemporary, Mr. Baxter, who observed,
" The Hobbians and other infidels would have persuaded
the world, that Selden was of their mind, but Sir Matthew
Hale, his intimate friend and executor, assured me that
Selden was an earnest professor to the Christian faith, and
so angry an adversary to Hobbs, that he hath rated him
out of the room *." It is true that Sir Symonds D'Ewes
tells us that though he always held " a good outward cor-
respondence," with Sir Robert Cotton and Selden, yet he
never sought or obtained much intimacy with them, " both
of them being more learned than pious ;" but what reliance
we ought to place in the judgment of such a violent
calvinistic bigot as Sir Symonds, may be left to the
decision of any reader, who will first make himself ac-
quainted with his diary, of which extracts are given by
various authorities f. On the other hand, Selden's
intimate friends were of the most learned and most pious
of the age ; the man who was beloved and sought for by
Sir Matthew Hale, and Archbishop Usher, will not be
condemned because he did not agree with Sir Symonds's
standard of excellence.

Of his learning notices are spread through the preceding
pages. Another testimony is in the following list of those
who were his friends and correspondents, and who looked
up to him as '* the great dictator of learning." This list

* Baxter's Diary, by Silvester, Pt. 3, 48.

i Kippis's Biographia Brit, in vita. D'Israeli's Curiosities of Lite-
rature, 2nd Series, iii. 329.



JOHN SELDEN. 363

is from a life of Selden in French, among the Birch
Manuscripts. Grotius, Saumasius, Bochart, Langbaine,
Pricaeus, Petit, Gataker, Casaubon, Jim., Gerard Vossius,
Imperialis, Holstenius, Rivet, Pococke, Golius, Purchas,
Spelman, Gronovius, Daniel Heinsius, Taylor, Louis du
Moulin, Boeclar, Spizelins, and if to these are added
Jonson, Peiresc, Usher, Herbert, Ravius and Meibomius,
there is enumerated a society of eminent acquaintances
such as few men ever enjoyed *.

The best panegyric of Selden, is a faithful relation of his
life. This has been attempted in the foregoing pages, and
the whole may be summed up in the words of his friend
Lord Clarendon: — " He was a person whom no character
can flatter, or transmit in any expressions equal to his
merit and virtue. He was of such stupendous learning,
in all kinds and in all languages, that a man would have
thought he had been entirely conversant among bo oks
and had never spent an hour but in reading and writing ;
yet his humanity, courtesy, and affability were such, that
he would have been thought to have been bred in the
best courts, but that his good nature, charity, and delight
in doing good, and in communicating all he knew, ex-
ceeded that breeding. His style in all his writings seems
harsh and sometimes obscure, which is not wholly to be
imputed to the abstruse subjects of which he commonly
treated, but to a little undervaluing of style, and too much

* Birch MSS. 4247,1.1. 107 v.



364 MEMOIRS OF

propensity to the language of antiquity ; but in his
conversation he was the most clear discourser, and had the
best faculty of making hard things easy, and presenting
them to the understanding, of any man that hath been
known. Mr. Hyde was wont to say that he valued himself
upon nothing more than upon having had Mr. Selden's
acquaintance from the time he was very young. If he
had some infirmities with other men, they were weighed
down with wonderful and prodigious excellencies in the
other scale *."

Poetry also contributed its aid to sound Sefden's elegiac
praise. The following lines, tinctured with the pedantry
of the age, are a very small part of the offering to his
memory, written by his worthy contemporary. Dr.
Bathurst.

" We ask not now for ancestors, nor care
Tho' Selden does nor kindred boast, nor heir
Such worth best stands alone, content to be
To itself both founder and posterity.

*****

When all thy statues shall be worn out so
That even Selden would not Selden know,
Ag-es to come shall in thy virtue share ;
He that dies well, makes all the world his heir f."

* Clarendon's Autobiography, 16. Fol. ed.
f Dryden's Miscellanies, Part iii., 44.



PORTRAITS OF SELDEN.



I am aware of four orig^inal painted Portraits of Selden. Thes
were by Mytens, Van Dyck, Sir Peter Lely, and W. Faithorne. That
by INIytens Is in the Bodleian Library.

Of these there have been many engraved copies.

1. Prefixed to his " Nativity of Christ," by J. Chantrey, 8vo. 1G61.

2. A quarto mezzotinto, after ^'^an Dyck's portrait, by J. Faber, Jun

1713.

3. A copy of Faithorne's, by J. Sturt.

4. A copy of Lely's, by G. Vertue, prefixed to Selden's Works,

edited by Dr. Wilkins, folio, 1726.

5. One after Faithorne, by R. White, prefixed to the " Janus

Anglorum," 1683, folio.

6. One prefixed to Dr. Pococke's edition of " Eutychius," 1658,

folio.

7. One at the corner of a portrait of Sir Thomas Bodley, by M.

Burgher ; being the frontispiece to the " Catalogue of the
Bodleian Library."

8. One by Freeman, after that by Sir P. Lely, prefixed to Dr.

Aikin's Lives of Selden and Usher, 1812, 8vo.

9. One engraved by Van Hove, 1677^ 12mo.

10. One with a library in the back ground, with four Latin verses

affixed, G. L. p. Scarce.

11. One by W. Birch, 1789, after the painting by Lely.

12. One by W. Holl, after the original by JMytens. In " Lodge's

Portraits."



366 PORTRAITS OF SELDEN.

13. One " Johannes Seldenus " with the arms from his monument, and

his motto. No engraver's name to my copy. 8vo.

14. One " Johannes Seldenus Armig." J. C. Bocklin, sculp. 8vo.
There has very lately been published another beautiful likeness of

Selden, in the " Gallery of Portraits," published by the Society for
the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge.

Many minor copies have appeared in editions of Selden's "■ Table"
Talk," that are not worthy of further notice.

A medal bearing Selden's likeness was engraved by one of the
Dassiers. (Nichol's Literary Anecdotes, i. 133. See also Bromley's
Catalogue of Engraved British Portraits. Granger's Biographical
Hist, of England.)



INDEX.



A.

Abbot, Dr., 155

Accommodation between the king

and the parliament hopeless, 297

" Administration of intestate's

goods, 160
Admiralty committee, 318
Aids, 82
Alexiad, 100
Alford, Mr., 96, 123
" Analecton Anglo-Britannicon,"

43
Anagrammatic trifling, 76
Andrews, Dr., anecdote of, 83,

102, 158
Antiquarian contemporaries of Sel-

den, 41
Antiquarian College, 42
" Apello Csesarem," 164
" Apostolic obedience," 129
Apsley, Sir A., 185
Arabic professorship of Oxford,

317
Aristocracy, 213
Arundel marbles, 160
Assembly of divines, 299, 302
Attainder against Strafford, 250



B.

Bacon, Lord, 86

Bagshaw, Mr., 261

Baillie, Mr., 299

Bail, law of, 145

Baker arms, 352

Bancroft's library, 325

Baronetcies, 82

Bastwick, 213

Benchers censure Selden, 110

Benevolence, A., 84, 105

Bibles, cheap and inaccurate, 303

, our present translation, 305

" Birth-day of our Saviour," 72
Bishops excluded from parliament,

228, 261
Bishops not jure divitio, 290
Buckingham, Duke of, 86, 92,

108, 115, 117, 119, 150, 152
Burton, 213



Cambridge benefited by Selden,

325
Canons issued, 216
Carlisle, Countess of, 272
B a



368 INDEX.

Carlisle, Earl of, 106 Constructive treason, 236

Catholic religion dreaded, 135 Coriton, Wm., 123, 173

Cavaliers, 2, 302 Corruption prevalent, 217

CjBsar, Sir J., 26 Corporation feast, 301

" Chancellor, brief discourse of Cotton family notice Selden, 39,

the," 48 160

Charles I., his character, 113, 233 Cotton, Sir R., 135, 160, 190, ]92

consents to Strafford's Council of peers, 226

death, 252 Country party, 136

^ subvert Court of James I. licentious, 91

the constitution, 255 Courtiers, 2, 85 •

retires from London, Cowell, Dr., 81

276 Crew, IMr., 29, 96

• commences the war, , Sir R,, 130,

281 Croke or Crooke, Sir G., 19, 220

, his duplicity, 334 Cromwell, O., 214, 231, 318, 343

illegally condemned. Currency proposed to be debased^

340 225

Christmas day, 56, 72

Chelsea College, 325 j)_

Church, an established one bene-
ficial, 126, 258 Davies Lady, 76

government resettled, " De Diis Syris," 50

299 Successionibus in bona De-

Civil war, 292 functi," 194, 200

Clarendon, Earl of, 222, 231, 232 Successione in Pontificatum."

Clergy advocate absolute power, 200

]25 Jure Naturale et Gentium,"

not to be privy councillors, 211, 26,



&c., 228, 263 Anno Civili Veteris Eccle-

covetous of power, 320 siae," 317



Coaches introduced, 86 Synedriis et Praefecturis," 345

Coin altered in value, 82 Nummis," 359

Coke, Sir E., 90, 96, 99, 109, Despotic measures, 182

116, 140, 145, 150 Devotions protracted, 300

Commission of array, 281, 282 Digby, Lord, 269

Commons, house of, 52, 79, 103 Digges, Sir D., 22, 119, 123, 140

Committee of peers, 106 Drayton's Polyolbion, 46

Conference between the houses, Dryden a pensioner, 319

140 Ducie, Robert, 100

Convocation without a parliament, " Duel," Selden s work on " The,"

216, 259 45



INDEX.



369



E.



Eadmer, 100, 105

Earl Marshal's court, 232

Eden, Dr., 325

Edge Hill, battle of, 293

Edmonds, Sir T., 169

" Eikon Basilike," 343

Elections, right of interference in,

79

, committee on the law

of, 109
Eliot, Sir J., 8, 119, 120, 123,
130, 149, 151, 168, 173, 174,
177, 189
Elizabeth's treatment of the com-
mons, 53, 78
EUesmere, Lord Chancellor, 90
Emigration attempted, 214
" England's Epinomis," 44
Episcopacy in danger, 154, 262

defended, 287

best assorts with mo-
narchy, 310
" Europae Speculum," 28
" Eutychii iEgyptii, Patriarchae,

&c." 287
Exaction of money, 115, 125, 130
Excommunication not legal, 321
Extravagance, 85



Falkland, Lord, 31, 231
Fanaticism of the period, 301
Finch, I\lr., 9(5, 109
Finch, Sir J., 149, 169, \7o, 220,

269
Fivemembers impeached, 270



Fleet lent to the king of France,

114
" Fleta," 331
Floyd or Fludd, Dr., 76
Fortescue, " De laudibus Le-

gibus," 48
Freedom of debate obstructed, 168



G.



Glanville, Serjeant, 109, 119
Glynn, Mr., I7, 235, 249, 294
Grey and Ruthen, baronies of, 198
Grievances, 114, 138, 231
Grimstone, Sir Harbottle, 262,
285



H.

Hale, Sir M., 353, 356, 362
Hampden, Sir E., 131
, J., 28, 214, 219, 270,

275, 279, 298
Haselrigge, Sir A., 270
Hayman, Sir P., 31, 17^, 173,

175
Heath, Sir R., 134, 138, 17G, 181
Heralds' office, 328
Herbert, Mr., 119,270
Hengham's " Summae," 48
Heywood, Edward, 65
Hi<rh Commission Court, 53
High Court of Justice, 33/
Hilliard, Sir J., 96
'' History of Tythes," 55
Hobart,SirM., 29, 173, 174, 189
Honorary distinctions, 82
Holies, Mr., 15, 169, 173, 189,

231, 270, 279, 298
Ilutton, Sir K., 220



370 INDEX.



K.



" Ignoramus," 154 Kent, Countess of, 354

Imprisonmentnotconfinement, 139 , Earl of, 157, 354

Independents quarrel with the Kimbolton, Lord, 270

Presbyterians, 333 Kings liable for their crimes, 338

Inscription in Selden's cottage, 34 Knighthood enforced by fine, 219

Intellectual improvement of Eng-
land, 74 T

" Interpreter, the," 81

Intolerance of the Presbyterians, g^^^^^ ^^^^ 33

337

' Lancaster elects Selden, 107

J Laud, Dr., 114, 163, 201, 260,

270,311

James I. disputes with Selden, 65 Legal party, 136

67 Lenthall, Mr., 273

on Revelations, 71 Lister, Sir M., a pensioner, 319

, his character, 80 Littleton, Mr., 117, 140, 146,

lavish of honours, 82 151, 217, 276

's idea of parliaments, 83, Liturgy resettled, 299

84 Loan exacted, 130, 225

• -, his person and character, j^o„g parliament, 226



89, 91 Long, Walter, 173, 189

erases the journals of the Lottery instituted, 82

House of Commons, 96

dies, 109

suspected of being poi- M.



soned, 25

James, Richard, 161 Mainwaring, Dr., 164

" Jani Anglorum," 44 Malignants, 302

Jews, Selden's first essay on the, Mallory, 99

48 " Mare Clausum," 56, 207

Jonson, Ben, 65 Liberum," 206

Judges consult with the king. Maritime dominion, 56

J 82 " Marmora Arundelliana," 160

Judicature of the House of Com- IMasques, 203

mons, 102 Martin, Sir H., 151

" of Parliament," 104 Maynard, Sir J., 17, 241, 285

Jus Divinum, 55 Mermaid Inn, 65

Juxon, Dr., 253, 254 Milward, Rev. Mr., 3.59



INDEX.



371



Mitchell, Sir R, 85
Moderate party, 3, 31, 267
Mompesson, Sir G., 85
Monopolists, 85, 218
" Monarchy of Man," 13
Montague, Sir H., 87

■ , Dr., 164

Moore, Sir G., 96
Moseley, Dr., 128, 196



N.

Naseby, battle of, 293

• papers, 335

Neale, Dr. , anecdote of, 83
Northumberland, Earl of, 80
Noy, Mr., 96, 109, 217

O.

Office, inquisition of, 158

Opinions endeavoured to be con-
trolled, 103

Opposition, the, 29, 173, 178

Orange, the parliamentary colour,
298

Ordinance for the militia, 280,
284

" Oriffin of Ecclesiastical ' Juris-
diction of Testaments," 160

Overreach, Sir G., 85

Oxford, Earl of, 102

marbles, 160

indebted to Selden, 327,

357

P.

Papists encouraged, 93
, 137, 231



Parian Chronicle, 160
Parliament assembled, 107, 114,

137, 163, 222, 226
dismissed, 157> 172



223



not called for eleven



years, 211



made permanent, 255

exceed their jurisdic-
tion, 256 , 270

Parliamentary time of sitting, 96

Patience under tyranny, 78

Patentees, 85, 218

Patriots described, 96

People should be conciliated, 107

Persecution adopted by all sects,
217

, its effect, 73

Petitions of grievance, 93

Petition of right, 140, 147, 165

Philips, Sir R., 28, 99, 146

Pierrepont, Mr., 296, 298

Pocock, Dr., 317

Poets laureate, 67

Political parties, 1, 136

state of England previous

to the time of James I., 52

Portraits of Selden, 365

Prerogative, efforts to reduce, 80

Preston, Dr., 154

Presbyterian church government,

287
" Privileges of the Baronage," 104
Privy seal, 115
Proclamations, 90, 218
" Proposition for his majesty's

service," 190
Protest of the House of Commons,

94
Prynn, 151, 202, 213, 327
Puritans, 137, 302



INDEX.



Purple the royalist colour, 298
Pym, J., 20, 99, 109, 119, 233,

240, 248, 270, 273, 279, 293,

314, 319

Q-

Queen impeached, 293

R.

Raleigh's literary club, 6G

Ramsay, David, 199

Readership of Lyon's Inn, 110,

112
Reforms effected, 256
Reformadoes, 272

Religious parties, 137, 201

Republican Vandalism, 32(i

Rhea, Donald, Earl, 199

Rich, Sir H., 91

, Sir N., 29, 151

Rochester, Viscount, 92

Rolls, ]Mr., 164, 167

Roundheads, 2, 302

Royalist cause ascendant, 295

Royalists, 136

Rudyard, Sir B., 29

Ruggles, the play-writer, 154

Rump, the, 226



S.



St James's Palace library, 344
St. John, Mr. O , 123, 224, 279,

285
Salisbury, Earl of, 92
Salvington, Selden's birth-place,33
Sandys, Sir Edsvin, 27, 30, 80,

99,' 102



Science of government unimprov-
ed, 77

Scape-goats, political, 152

Scotch Presbyterians oppressed,
216

Sedans introduced, 86

Selden's parentage, 36

birth, 37

• education, 38

studies the law, 39

early friends, 40

.. studies antiquities, 41

poetry, 47

— first persecution, 57

introduced at court, 65

declaration relating to his

History of Tithes, 68

Bacon's adviser, 88

consulted by the House of

Commons, 96

imprisoned, 57, 99, 173,



184



incorruptible, 104

in parliament, 31, 107,

117, 138,226
censured by the Templars,



110



charged with erasing re-
cords, 146
the Earl of Kent's steAV-



ard, 157
more stern in opposition,



166



's study sealed up, 1 75

examined by the privy

council, 176

refuses to give bail, 186

again prosecuted, 190

why his biography select-



ed, 7



his first parliamentary



speech, 31



INDEX.



373



Selden elected a bencher of the

Inner Temple, 113
" ■ argues against the Duke

of Buckingham, 117

pleads for the objectors to



the loan, 130



Sheriffs unable to represent their

counties in parliament, 116
Ship-money 219, 225
Sibthorpe, Dr., 128
Solemn league and covenant, 309
Solitary confinement, 184

characterised by the Lord Spanish match, 93

President, 1 40 Speaker forcibly held in the chair,

's lodging, 197 169, 179

and Hyde separate, 232 Soap, a grievous monopoly, 218

votes for Strafford, 251 Southampton, Earl of, 99, 102

offered the Chancellorship, Stapylton, Sir P., 319

277:. 279 Statesmen, their duties, 4
made a deputy lieutenant, Strafford, Earl of, 117, 151, 164,



285



233



399



a member of the Synod,

keeper of the Tower re-

ords, 308
a manager of the Admi-



', his trial, 236



ralty, 318

voted money, 320

elected Master of Trinity



Hall, 323

, visiter of Oxford, 327

might have had any pre-



ferment, 329
strives for a reconciliation.



334



political life closed, 342

admired by Cromwell, 343

prepares for death, 347

dies, 349

, his epitaph, 349

funeral, 351

's arms, 352

's person, 352

's character, 353, 360, 303

■ s will, 355

. '9. motto, 360

"s friends, 36.3

Self-denying ordinance, 318



Straffordians, 251
Strangeways, Sir J., 123, 146, 252
Stuart faithlessness, 129
Strode, Wm., 173, 193, 270
Suffolk, Earl of, 146
Superstition of the 17th century,
75

T.

" Table Talk," 359

" Ten Writers of Englisli His-
tory," 346

Terms proposed to Charles, 335

Theatricals reprobated, 202

Tillcsley, Dr., 77

'' Titles of Honour," 47

Tithes, right to, 59, 63

Tonnage and poundage, 150, 165,
218

Tories, 2

Treasurership, Lord, 87

Turner, Dr., 117, 195

U. & V.

Fsher, Archbibhop, 82, .301, 306,
347, 352



374



INDEX.



« Uxor Ebraica," 330
Valentine Mr., 169, 173, 189
Vane, Sir H., 242, 315
"Vindiciae Maris Clausi," 208,
347

W.

Waller s plot, 294, 295
Wardship abolished, 323
Wandesford, Mr., 119
Wentworth, Sir T., 123, 151, 164
Weston, Sir R., 94



Whigs, 2

Whitby, Mr., 119

Whitelocke, Mr. B., 19, 296, 319,

344, 348
Williams, Lord Keeper, 101, 116,

158, 214
Windebank, secretary, 269
Worral, Dr., 128
Wrest, 157



Young, Patrick, 161.



THE END,



LONDON :
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Online LibraryGeorge William JohnsonMemoirs of John Selden : and notices of the political contest during his time → online text (page 23 of 23)