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<PLAT IN THREE



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QILBERT MURRAY



LONDON

GEORGE 4LLEN 6? COMPANY, LTD.
1914

[All rights reserved}



First published . . . 1900
Revised Edition . . . 1914



All rights, including Acting rights in the
English Language, reserved



TREFATQRT LETTER


MY DEAR ARCHER,

The germ of this pla\ sprang into existence on a
certain April day in 1896 ivhich you and I spent chiefly
in dragging our reluctant bicycles up the great hills that
surround Riveaulx Abbey, and discussing, so far as the
blinding rain allowed us, the questions whether all sincere
comedies are of necessity cynical, and how often we had had
tea since the morning, and how far it would be possible
to treat a historical subject loyally and unconventionally on
a modern stage. Then we struck (as, I fear, is too often
the fate of those who converse with me) on the subject of
the lost plays of the Greek tragedians. We talked of the
extraordinary variety of plot that the Greek dramatist
found in his historical tradition, the force, the fire, the
depth and richness of character-play. We thought of
the marvellous dramatic possibilities of an age in which
actual and living heroes and sages were to be seen moving
against a background of primitive superstition and blank
savagery ; in ivhich the soul of man walked more free
from trappings than seems ever to have been permitted
to it since. But I must stop ; I see that I am approaching
the common pitfall of playwrights who venture upon
prefaces, and am beginning to prove how good my play
ought to be.



vi ANDROMACHE

What I want to remind you of is this : that we agreed
that a simple historical play, with as little convention
as possible, placed in the Greek Heroic Age, and dealing
with one of the ordinary heroic stories, ought to be, well,
an interesting experiment. Beyond this point, I know,
we began to differ. You wanted verse and the Greece
of the English poets. I wanted, above all things, a
nearer approach to my conception of the real Greece, the
Greece of history and even dare I say it ? of anthro-
pology. I recognise your full right to disapprove of every
word and every sentiment of this play from the first to
the last, but I hope you will not grudge me the pleasure
of associating your name with at least the inception of the
experiment, and thanking you at the same time for the
many gifts of friendly encouragement and stimulating
objurgation which you have bestowed upon
Tours sincerely,

GILBERT MURRAT.

January 1900.



NOTE TO REVISED EDITION

THIS play has been out of print for some years, except for
the handsome American edition published by the Mosher
Press in Port/and, Maine. I have slightly revised the
language in a few places, always in the direction of
severity, and I have cut out a number of stage directions.
Some seemed superjluous ; some, having been written at a
time when I had very little experience of the stage, had
proved a difficulty rather than a help in actual production.
I reprint the original prefatory letter without comment,
except to say that it was written a good long time ago.
The play strikes me now as ultra-romantic ; but at the
time I believed it to be a piece of severe realism, and was
proud of the effort with which I had abstained from

poetry and all its delusions.

G. M.

OXFORD, 1914.



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ANDROMACHE



DRAMATIS PERSONA

PYRRHUS .... Son of Achilles ; King of Phthia.

ANDROMACHE . . . Once wife of Hector, Prince of

Troy ; now slave to Pyrrhus.

HERMIONE . . . Daughter of Helen, Queen oj

Sparta ; wife to Pyrrhus.

MOLOSSUS . . . Child of Pyrrhus and Andro-

mache.

ALCIMEDON or ALCIMUS . An old Captain of Achilles' Myr-
midons.

ORESTES .... Son of Agamemnon, King of

Mycente ; now banished for
the slaying of his mother,
Clytamnestra.

PYLADES A Prince of Phocis, friend to

Orestes.

A PRIEST OF THETIS

Two MAIDS OF HERMIONE

Certain Maidens, Myrmidons, Men-at-Arms.

The Action takes place in Phthia, on the Southern borders of
Thessaly, a&out fifteen years after the Fall of Troy.



ANDROMACHE



THE FIRST ACT

SCENE : The coast of Phthia. Rocks, with the sea visible
behind them. One of the rocks is a shrine, having
niches cut in it for receiving offerings. On the right
is the Altar of Thetis, shrouded in trees ; to the left,
a well. A path to the left leads to PYHRRUS' castle ;
another, far back to the right, leads to the house of
the PRIEST. // is the morning twilight, with a
faint glimmer of dawn.

At the foot of the rock ORESTES is seated in meditation ;
he carries two spears, and wears the garb of a
traveller. An ARMED MAN is moving off the stage
at the back, as though going towards the sea ; he
stops suddenly, listens, and hides behind a rock.

Enter, coming up from the sea, PVLADES, armed.
The MAN steps out.

MAN.
My lord Pylades.

PYLADES.
Where have you left him ?



4 ANDROMACHE

MAN.

Yonder, by the shrine. He bade me go back to
the ship.

PYLADES.

(Crossing to ORESTES.) Is it too late to turn your
purpose ?

ORESTES.

(As though half roused from his reverie.} I seek only
to see if she is indeed so passing beautiful. She was ;
I am sure she was, until [He pauses.

PYLADES.
Let me go first and spy out a way for you.

ORESTES.

(With sudden resentment?) You think I am still
mad !

PYLADES.

Nay, no more mad than I, but more quick to anger.
It would be safer for me to go.

ORESTES.

You think I am still mad because I dared not say
it. I will say it here by the altar. (Doggedly.} I
will see if she is still as she used to be before the day
when I shed my mother's blood, and first saw

PYLADES.

Speak not Their name, brother. You did nought
but the gods' plain bidding. You sec them no more
now that you are healed.



ANDROMACHE 5

ORESTES.
'Twas you that feared to name them, not I.

PYLADES.

Nay, you fear nothing ; that is why I must fear
for you.

ORESTES.

What is there to fear for me ? Most like I shall
come back just as I am.

PYLADES.
That is the one thing that cannot be.

ORESTES.

(Musingly.] If she is changed as all the world else

is changed since that time (Abruptly.] I care

not for the woman. I will come back. If not

[Smiles ambiguously.

PYLADES.

But why go alone, and why venture so much ? We
two could lie hid in the thickets by the shrine yonder,
and see her when the women come to pray at sunrise.
And then

ORESTES.

{With determination^ interrupting him.) I will go
alone, and see her and speak with her alone. Hinder
me not, friend ! Leave no man to watch over me.
Keep the ship well hidden, and have twoscore men
ambushed above the cliff, to hold the path if need
comes.



6 ANDROMACHE

PYLADES.

There shall be fourscore ever ready to your call,
night or day.

MAN.

^^

(Coming down from path at back.) My chief, the
dawn is drawing close.

ORESTES.
Ay, get you gone before any worshippers come.

PYLADES.

As you will, then. And Apollo be your guard !
[Exeunt PYLADES and ARMED MAN. ORESTES
wraps his mantle round him and sits in
silence.

Enter from the right, PRIEST of Thetis, with a bowl in
his hands. He climbs a rock at the back and
watches the sunrise.

PRIEST.

Not yet. Not quite yet. Ah, there it catches the
crag-top : now the trees : yes, there is the glint far
off on the sea. (Comes down towards the shrine and
prays.) Hail, Thetis ! Accept this wine and honey
I bring thee at first touch of dawn. Keep thy Priest
in wealth and honour, even as I keep thy worship.
And, as the sunlight drives the Things of darkness
from thy waters (Seeing ORESTES.) Averter ot
evil ! Who is this that has sat through the darkness
under the Holy Rock ? Stranger, whence come you
here ?



ANDROMACHE 7

ORESTES.
From Acarnania. Have I sinned in resting here ?

PRIEST.

No man of Phthia, for his life, would stay here in
darkness. Saw you not anything ?

ORESTES.
What should I see ?

PRIEST.

No changing manifold shapes, as of women or
winged things ?

ORESTES.

(Harshly.] I saw nought but what I have seen on
a thousand nights. Enough ! If I have offended
any goddess I will make amends.

[He begins to wring off a pendant from a gold
chain that he wears y and moves towards
the altar.

PRIEST.
Stay ! There is no stain upon your hands ?

ORESTES.
I have shed blood ere now.

PRIEST.
How long since ? Is the blood washed off?

ORESTES.
Oh, I have been purified and purified !



8 ANDROMACHE

PRIEST.

Duly and fully with hyssop and the blood of
swine ?

ORESTES.

With better sacrifices than swine. I am clean
enough to make amends to your goddess. (Coming
across to the shrine.} Where shall I lay it. For I
may need her favour. [Holds out the gold pendant.

PRIEST.

(Surprised.) Gold ! Stranger, it is well to give
gold to Thetis, but

ORESTES.
Well, I give it to Thetis.

PRIEST.

Scarce a man in Phthia has ever touched gold, save
Pyrrhus himself and the servants of Hermione. Nor
many, I should guess, in Acarnania.

ORESTES.

A banished man must have his wealth in little
compass.

PRIEST.

A chain like that should buy an exile's return.

ORESTES.
I care not to return.

PRIEST.
Are the friends of the dead so bitter against you ?



ANDROMACHE 9

ORESTES.

The friends of the dead are dead, and my friends
are dead. I have none to fear; but I have been
wronged, my house taken from me, and my father's
wealth, and the woman that was vowed me to wife.
No more, old man ! I am an exile, and live in
happier lands than mine own.

PRIEST.

Is it in Phthia you seek for a happy land ? No
matter ; affliction comes to the good as to the evil.

ORESTES.
Why, what ails your city, if a stranger may know ?

PRIEST.

See you that shrine, and the footprint of Thetis in
the rock ? Once it was all covered with offerings.

ORESTES.

It is not so well loaded, nor yet so ill. Is there no
worse than that ?

PRIEST.

Worse ? Barren fields and a barren queen, and
hatred in the house of Achilles !

ORESTES.
Is it some sin the King has done ?

PRIEST.
The King and a woman.



10

ORESTES.

(Starting.) Has that sin met its punishment ?
Speak plainly, Priest.

PRIEST.

Long years ago, Pyrrhus brought back from Troy
a slave woman to share his bed.

ORESTES.

(As though reassured.} Hector's wife, Andromache,
men say.

PRIEST.

The wife of his father's bitterest enemy ! Ay, and
she was his enemy too, and loathed her life with
Pyrrhus.

ORESTES.

They all struggle, these women captives. But
what harm came of it ?

PRIEST.
She is a foe to the land and to Thetis.

ORESTES.

But has he not cast her off? {With constraint.)
Men say he has wedded a new Queen, the daughter
of Helen.

PRIEST.

Oh, the Trojan has not dwelt in the King's house
these ten years back. She begged him for a hut in
the mountain, and he gave it her.

ORESTES.
She begged to be sent away ! How was that ?



ANDROMACHE 11

PRIEST.

Why should a woman wish to live in secret, and
not be seen ? (Slight pause.} There be wise women
among the barbarians.

ORESTES.

Wise in bad drugs and magic ; I know no other
wisdom in them.

PRIEST.

You have said it. There is a prophet here who
knows of counter-charms I gave him three ewes for
this that I wear (showing a charm made of wolves'
teeth) else I durst not face her.

ORESTES.
Whom has she chiefly hurt ?

PRIEST.

Men say she has waked the dead Hector to come
to her across the seas. (He shudders.} But for the
King, we should have judged her long ago.

ORESTES.
Does the new Queen hate her ?

PRIEST.

Has she not blighted the womb of the Queen ?
There is no heir to Achilles in Achilles' land.

ORESTES.

And does Pyrrhus sit still while his Queen is thus
wronged ?



12 ANDROMACHE

PRIEST.

Cannot a witch blind the eyesj? He can see
nothing, and will hearken to nothing. Even now
he has taken the Trojan woman's bastard with him.

ORESTES.
Is Pyrrhus away from the land ? Where ?

PRIEST.

He has gone hunting in the hills yonder (pointing)
and down to the fields of the Napaens.

ORESTES.
When should he return ?

PRIEST.

To-day, it may be it is the fifth day of the
hunt ; but the game may keep him some time yet.
{Enter ALCIMEDON, L., an old man with spears but no
armour ; he carries a bunch of violets for Thetis.) The
witch woman is mad lest any hurt come to the boy.

ALCIMEDON.

Health to you, Priest, and discretion to your
tongue !

PRIEST.

Health I accept, Alcimedon : discretion to them
that need it !

ORESTES.

(To the PRIEST.) Why, what should bring hurt to
the lad ?



ANDROMACHE 13

ALCIMEDON.

(Carelessly, passing on.) Jealousy, stranger. Priests
and barren women.

[He passes on to the altar, and then to the rock,
where he puts his violets.

PRIEST.
Jealousy !

ORESTES.

(Involuntarily.) Hermione would never plot against
the boy.

[He makes an angry movement after ALCIMEDON.

PRIEST.

What jealousy ? What need to be jealous of him ?
He is no true heir. We have a King, and we have
a Queen, both of the blood of Zeus, both our true
rulers, but heir there is none.

ALCIMEDON.

(Seeing and handling the gold link.) Ye golden gods,
have the sons of Pactolus come to Phthia ?

ORESTES.

The curse of the crawling lichen on the man who
moves that gold !

ALCIMEDON.

On your own head ! (He throws the gold quickly
down.) Who are you, stranger, to curse one that has
done you no wrong ?



14 ANDROMACHE

ORESTES.

I check the wrong before it is done. And I tell
not my name save to my host after I have eaten and
slept.

ALCIMEDON.

If you come to teach your manners to the
Myrmidons, by Thetis ! you shall learn theirs first.
Is the stranger yours, O Priest ?

ORESTES.

I have broken no man's bread nor touched his
hand. (Defiantly.) What seek you more ?

ALCIMEDON.

Why is he so bold ? Has he sanctuary with
Thetis ?

ORESTES.

(Lifting his two spears.) This is my sanctuary.
And there is more gold for the man that will
break through it.

PRIEST.

Stay ! Slay not the stranger so fast, Alcimedon.
Reason with him. He will give up the chain, and
we will let him go in peace.

ALCIMEDON.

Go in peace, when he has lifted his spear against
Alcimedon ! How shall I look my grandchildren in
the face ? By Thetis ! I will wash the chain with
his blood.



ANDROMACHE 15

PRIEST.

Beware ; he has spears ! It is man to man.

[Noise of footsteps. ORESTES puts his back
towards a rock, so that neither he nor
ALCIMEDON sees ANDROMACHE, the
MAID, and two other damsels, who enter
with pitchers on their heads.

ALCIMEDON.

(With his eye on ORESTES.) Ha ! who comes there ?
(Calling to the newcomers without looking at them.) A
stranger in arms, and with gold ! Ho ! Myrmidons !

ANDROMACHE.
Shame on you, Alcimedon, robber of strangers !

ALCIMEDON.

Is it you ? (Tie/ding reluctantly.] Nay, he is no
man's guest ; it is lawful to slay him.

ANDROMACHE.

He is mine. (To ORESTES.) Stranger, give me
your right hand. (To ALCIMEDON.) He is my guest.

ORESTES.

(Still stormy and excited.} Shall I take a woman's
hand for fear of this old loon ? My spear-blade is
dry and has not drunk.

PRIEST.

Stranger, you are alone ; a wise man chooses
peace, and not war.



16 ANDROMACHE

ORESTES.

Alone ? As a wolf among sheep is alone. When
he slays first the dog (pointing spear at ALCIMEDON)
and bleeds the sheep as he will.

ANDROMACHE.

And who will be the better when he has bled
them ? Nay, old friend (to ALCIMEDON, who wants
to break in ; then to ORESTES again) though you
slay us all, you have but lost the food and shelter we
had given you ; and the shedder of blood escapes not
the Dread Watchers.

ORESTES.

(Who had been cooling, starts and threatens her.)
What know you of the Dread Watchers ?

ANDROMACHE.

And there is little glory in the slaying of a woman,
and little gain.

ORESTES.

(Wildly.) What woman ? Who are you that taunt
me ? ... Priest, is this your witch ?

ALCIMEDON.

She is no witch. You lie, both ; both stranger
and priest !

ANDROMACHE.

I am a bondwoman of the King.

ALCIMEDON.
Andromache, once wife of Hector, Prince of Troy.



ANDROMACHE 17

ORESTES.
And am I to be the guest of a bondwoman ?

ANDROMACHE.

There are others of free estate who will take you
in. I only sought to save men's lives.

ORESTES.

What worth are men's lives ? I will be guest to
none but the King.

ANDROMACHE.

One of these will guide you, when you will, to
Pyrrhus' castle.

ORESTES.

(Relaxing suddenly.) Oh, let me be.

[He sits down on a rock, and buries his face in
his hands.

ANDROMACHE.
The man is very weary and sore at heart, Alcimedon.

PRIEST.
It may be he is mad. It is well we hurt him not.

ALCIMEDON.

Banishment may make a man well-nigh mad. I
remember the year of my own manslaying.

ANDROMACHE.

Perchance he has been long alone in the forests.
Take him and give him food and drink.



i8 ANDROMACHE

ALCIMEDON.

The priest can take him. I want no more of the
man.

ORESTES.

Nay, touch me not. Leave me awhile.

PRIEST.
(To the others.] It is well. Make your prayers.

ANDROMACHE.

(Approaching the attar, and praying with upstretched
hands.} Greeting to thee and joy, Thetis, mother of
all Phthia. Give us peace in this land ; and grant
that my son Molossus return safe, and grow to give
joy to thee and all this house !

ALCIMEDON.

(In the same way.} Joy to thee, Thetis ! Accept
my offerings, and grant that my arms keep strong,
and that I find the man whose swine have trampled
my barley field.

MAID.

It will be a long day before Thetis grants you that,
old man.

ALCIMEDON.

(Grumbling.) If I only knew of any one that
knew !

PRIEST.

(To FIRST MAID.) Have you a prayer to make ?

MAID.

(Taking offerings from other MAIDS to add to her
own.) Hail, Thetis ! and may joy be ever with thee !



ANDROMACHE 19

Accept these offerings from the bondmaidens Aithra,
and Pholoe, and Deianassa ; and grant all good things
to them and theirs. [// pause.

ALCIMEDON.

The jade ! She is praying in silence. Ho, stop
her, Priest ! {The others giggle.

MAID.
'Tis as good as a witch's prayer, at the worst.

ALCIMEDON.

(Taking hold of her and threatening her with the shaft
of his spear.} Say it aloud, now ! Say what it was !

MAID.
I won't ! I won't ! Let me be. It was no harm.

ANDROMACHE.
Let her be.

ALCIMEDON.

Swear it was nothing touching me, nor my crops,
nor those swine !

MAID.

By Thetis, I think not of you, nor your crops nor
your swine !

ORESTES.

(Recovering from his reverie.} Well, lead me in. I
will be the guest of any that will take me.

PRIEST.

You have given an offering, stranger ; you may
pray if you will.



20 ANDROMACHE

ORESTES.

I to Thetis ? No ! Yet perhaps (Going up

to altar.) Hail, Thetis ! I have given thee an offer-
ing of many oxen's price, and many more will I give
if thou hinder me not of my desires.

ALCIMEDON.

A vile prayer, a very dangerous prayer ! He might
as well have prayed silently. I will not take the
man ; the Priest may take him.

[The PRIEST goes towards ORESTES.

ORESTES.

(Looking about and scanning the faces.) I will be this
bondwoman's guest.

ANDROMACHE.

So be it, stranger. (The PRIEST moves anxiously
towards ORESTES.) And perchance the Priest will
give you shelter till my work is done.

PRIEST.

Ay, come with me. When the King returns, it
were meeter that he should take you. (Aside to
ORESTES.) Beware, stranger ! It is the Phrygian
woman.

ORESTES.

(Apart to PRIEST.) She is over-wise, methinks ; but
not evil. I fear her not. (Coming back as though on
impulse.) I give you my hand, wife of Hector !

ANDROMACHE.
It is well, my guest. [ Taking his hand.



ANDROMACHE 21

PRIEST.
Till the King returns.

[Exeunt PRIEST and ORESTES R.

ALCIMEDON.

(As ANDROMACHE and the women draw water at the
well.} Lazy hounds, to let Hector's wife draw water !
Fill her pails for her, little foxes !

FIRST MAID.

Better she fill- mine! Perhaps she knows charms
for filling them.

ANDROMACHE.
It is well, fellow slave. Let our work be even.

Enter^ by the path from the Castle, HERMIONE, with
two attendants carrying libations. She does not
notice the slaves.

ALCIMEDON.
Greeting, O Queen.

HERMIONE.

Greeting, old man. (Going up to the altar.) Hail,
Thetis, and have joy ! Accept this wine and the
blood of an ewe with two lambs that I bring to thee ;

and take off from me, I beseech (She stops^ looks

round) and sees ANDROMACHE, on whom she turns with
vehemence.) You ? [Flings out the blood on the ground.

ALCIMEDON.

Queen, you have flung out the blood upon the
ground !



22 ANDROMACHE

HERMIONE.

What would my sacrifice profit, with that woman's
eyes upon me? (To ANDROMACHE.) Get you back
to the castle ! Is the water not drawn yet ?

ANDROMACHE.
I go, O Queen !

ALCIMEDON.
You are over-proud, my Queen, over-proud.

HERMIONE.

May a Queen in Phthia not give commands to her
own slaves ?

MAID.

(At the shrine.) Holy Aphrodite, some one has put
gold upon the shrine !

ALCIMEDON.

'Twas a stranger that the Priest has taken in.
Have a care : the dog laid a curse on any who should
move it.

HERMIONE.

A stranger ? He comes from the South, then ;
from Athens, or Argos, or Mycenae

ALCIMEDON.

No, Queen, he is only an Acarnanian. But belike
he has journeyed to the South.

HERMIONE.

That is no Acarnanian gold. ( Taking it up.) See
you the sea-beast wrought on it, with many feet ?

[To MAID.



ANDROMACHE 23

MAID.
Yes, but the curse, Queen

HERMIONE.

(Not heeding her.] It brings my home back to me.
In Lacedaemon we all wore chains of gold about our
necks.

MAID.
Queen, the man laid a curse upon it.

HERMIONE.

(Putting it back.} I meant no evil ; and that dear
gold of the South will never hurt me In Aga-
memnon's palace the men had gold in their armour,
and even in the blades of their swords. And the
gold was wrought into lions and wild bulls and trees,
and strange sea-beasts like this.

ALCIMEDON.
A plain haft and a plain blade cuts the steadiest.

HERMIONE.

(Angrily.} Bah ! You think because you are rude
you are valiant, Alcimedon. The soldiers of the
South were as brave as you.

ALCIMEDON.

(Turning away towards the maidens.} Let not
Andromache draw the water, jades !

HERMIONE.
Will you not draw for her yourself, old man ?



24 ANDROMACHE

ALCIMEDON.

/ draw water ! (Drawing himself up in indignation.}
By Hermes ! I care not for the tongue of a barren
woman.

[Voices and the loud talk of huntsmen are heard
outside.

VOICE OF MOLOSSUS.
Ho ! Mother, Mother !

MAID.

It is Molossus ! And the King's huntsmen. They
are coming up the path.

ALCIMEDON.
Already ?

HERMIONE.

(To ANDROMACHE, who has stopped.) Why do you
wait ? Have I not bidden you back to the castle ?
And when the hall is swept, go to your own house.
Come not up to trouble the King till that web is
finished.

ANDROMACHE.
I go, O Queen.

VOICE OF PYRRHUS.

(Outside.) 'Ho, mother of Molossus ! Stay, and
look at him.



ANDROMACHE 25

MOLOSSUS and PYRRHUS enter, with some spearmen ;
PYRRHUS has his arm on the neck of MOLOSSUS.

MOLOSSUS.

(Running forward.} Mother, look ! I have slain a
man !

PYRRHUS.

He has slain his first man.

[MoLossus holds up his hands, the palms of
which are smeared with blood.

MOLOSSUS.

See, mother ; they have smeared me with his
blood !

HERMIONE.

(Holding aloof.} Keep away from the altar, with
foul hands !

ANDROMACHE.

(To PYRRHUS, with reproach, while she embraces
MOLOSSUS.) You said you would take him to no
battles, only to hunting.

PYRRHUS.

(Cheerily.} By Hermes, it was he who made the
battle ! I meant nothing but hunting.

ALCIMEDON.
Well done, boy ! A true prince, a true prince !

PYRRHUS.

We had driven the deer down over the mountains
and we came on a herd of the Napaeans' cattle
grazing, right up on the moors.



26 ANDROMACHE

ANDROMACHE.

You promised me you would raid no cattle with
him.

PYRRHUS.

By Hermes ! They came to us ! And the herd-boy
never saw us ; he was sitting on a stone in the sun,
and thinking of nothing. And even then I would
not raid the cattle. When suddenly up jumped the
herd-boy and looked at us, with his mouth open.
And before he knew who we were, I heard a twang
and there he was with an arrow in his neck !

[Laughs.
MOLOSSUS.

Right through his throat, mother ! He was look-
ing up. [Imitating the attitude.'] And I have got a
pipe he was plaiting. It wasn't finished, but it blows.
[He shows a pipe made of reeds.

PYRRHUS.

You can play better things than pipes, my boy.
So we ran down and cut off the cattle ; and I have


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Online LibraryGilbert MurrayAndromache, a play in three acts → online text (page 1 of 4)