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given them to Molossus for his own herd.

MOLOSSUS.
And father put the blood on my hands himself.

PYRRHUS.
I will do more for you than that, my firstborn.

HERMIONE.

\lVho has kept back^ by the altar.] Take up your
pitcher, and begone, woman !



ANDROMACHE 27

PYRRHUS.

[Turning upon HERMIONE.] Now, by Peleus,
daughter of Helen, what would you ?

HERMIONE.

That when my slave is gone you may give me
greeting.

PYRRHUS.

I give you greeting. But I praise not your greet-
ing to me.

HERMIONE.

If I send my women to draw water at sunrise,
shall the water not be back when the shadows are
thus ?

PYRRHUS.

There be other women meeter to draw water than
Hector's wife. I tell you there is no man on this
earth I should so joy to have slain as Hector.

HERMIONE.

If he had witchwork to help him, he may have
been a deadly fighter.

ANDROMACHE.

(To PYRRHUS, w ho has laid his hand on her shoulder.}
Nay, master, the hall must be made ready.

PYRRHUS.

Well, take our boy, and be with him at the castle
when I come. Stay, think of a boon to ask of me in
return for the day's good work. And make it a rich
boon ; I shall not stint you.



28 ANDROMACHE

ANDROMACHE.
I know it now ; but I fear to anger my lord.

PYRRHUS.

Ask on ; yet I would not have you ask for freedom
from me.

ANDROMACHE.

My master, what could I do now with freedom ?
Only suffer Molossus to make atonement to the
Napzeans for the man he slew. He may give back
the oxen, and I will add of my own.

PYRRHUS.

(Displeased.) Atonement ! Who are the Napaeans
to seek atonement from me ?

ANDROMACHE.
Nay, my lord, it was scarce a righteous slaying.

PYRRHUS.

Not righteous ! (Scornfully.) Then perchance you
would have me cut off the herd-boy's hands and
feet, for fear his ghost should come after us ? Not
righteous ! What is it you fear ?

ANDROMACHE.

(Putting her hand on MOLOSSUS' shoulder.) He is
but a boy, my lord. And if there is no atonement,
they will watch day and night to slay him.



ANDROMACHE 29

MOLOSSUS.
Mother, I fear them not !

ANDROMACHE.
They will raid us again

PYRRHUS.

I can do them twice and four times the hurt they
can do me.

ANDROMACHE.

They cannot hurt us in our castle, but they can
burn the villages in the plain and make dearth and
famine.

MOLOSSUS.

Oh, Mother, why should I make atonement for my
first man ?

PYRRHUS.

It was only a boy, too. I cannot ask forgiveness
for one boy.

ANDROMACHE.

It will cost little. I have three carpets of Sidon
work

PYRRHUS.

And the oxen ! I have given them to the lad ;
and one is already eaten. Well, well, it is for the
lad to say if he will give back his oxen and ask for
pardon.



30 ANDROMACHE

HERMIONE.

(With a ring of emotion in her voice.) Shall my
chests be made empty because your slave's child is
afraid ?

MOLOSSUS.

I am not afraid. I will never atone.

PYRRHUS.

(To HERMIONE.) Peace, O Queen ! (To ANDRO-
MACHE.) Go ! If Molossus wills, he can make his
atonement. On to the castle, men !

[Exeunt spearmen.
ANDROMACHE.

Be not wroth, my King. Your hall would be very
desolate if the boy were slain.

[Exeunt ANDROMACHE and MOLOSSUS.

HERMIONE.

There is another atonement should come first, if
you must humble yourself.

PYRRHUS.
(Stopping as he is going off".} What other ?

HERMIONE.

Atone to Orestes, Agamemnon's son, that you stole
away his bride !

PYRRHUS.

(Firing up and laying his hand on his dagger.}
Daughter of a dog ! I stole no man's bride.



ANDROMACHE 31

HERMIONE.
Was I not vowed and sworn to Orestes ?

PYRRHUS.

Your father vowed you, not I. What is it to me
if your father broke his oaths ?

HERMIONE.

You helped him and bribed him to break them.
The wrath of the Broken Oath is on both of you.

PYRRHUS.

You are mad, woman. Orestes had murdered his
mother, and the Spirits without Name haunted him
day and night

HERMIONE.

My father knew that when he betrothed me. He
could be purified.

PYRRHUS.
(Scornfully.) Purified ? For slaying his mother ?

HERMIONE.

And you, you dared not enter the land while
Agamemnon's son was there ; you waited till

PYRRHUS.

'Twas your father cozened Orestes away. How
should I fear Agamemnon's son ? Am I not the son
of Achilles ?



32 ANDROMACHE

HERMIONE.
And was Achilles a better man than Agamemnon ?

PYRRHUS.
All the world knows he was.

HERMIONE.

Then why did all the world choose Agamemnon to
be their king ?

PYRRHUS.
Bah ! Very feeble men may be kings.

HERMIONE.

They may, in Phthia ; and beggarly men, and
savage, and witch-ridden, and makers of atonement,
and stealers of wives !

PYRRHUS.

By Peleus ! if I stole you, you were willing. 'Tis
yourself you mark with a dog's name, Helen's
daughter !

HERMIONE.

God be witness, willing I never was ! Though I
dreamed not then that I should come to a beggared
land and the house of a master who hated me.

[Flings herself down by the altar, hidden from
the centre of the stage by the trees.



ANDROMACHE 33

PYRRHUS.
By Thetis, woman, you are bewitched !

HERMIONE.
{With a cry.) Bewitched ! Have I not said it ?

Enter from R. back, PRIEST and ORESTES.

PRIEST.

(To ORESTES.) Here is the King himself. (To
PYRRHUS.) Son of Achilles, I bring you this stranger,
whom your handmaid, Andromache, commended to
my care.

PYRRHUS.
Whence comes he, and what seeks he ?

PRIEST.

From Acarnania, banished for the slaying of a
man.

PYRRHUS.
He seeks not purification ?

ORESTES.

The blood is faded long ago from my hand. I
seek but to rest a while at your castle ; I will give
payment either in battle with your enemies, or by
tidings and songs from beyond Parnassus and the
Waters of Pelops.

[HERMIONE looks up in amazement at the voice,
utters a stifled cry, and peers round.

C



34 ANDROMACHE

PYRRHUS.

It is well, stranger. Tidings are good in peace ;
and if war comes, an exile for manslaying may well
be worth the bread he eats.

ORESTES.

Others know if I am skilled in war. I know only
that my life is little worth to me, and I care not
much to save it.

PYRRHUS.

A good word, Sir Guest, and worthy of the roof
of Achilles. We give you greeting, my Queen and I.
(Shakes his hand^ and looks round for HERMIONE.)
Daughter of Helen, have you not seen our guest ?

HERMIONE.

(In a startled tone.) Seen him ? What do you
mean, my lord ?

ORESTES.

Nay, though methinks I have heard the Queen's
praises till it is almost as though I knew her. For
the women of the South speak daily of Helen's
daughter, and the bards and kings' sons will never
forget her.

HERMIONE.

(Mastering her agitation with difficulty.) You know
the land of Pelops, stranger ? It is a fair land.

ORESTES.

Once it was far the fairest upon earth. But now
its pride is brought down, and that which made it
beautiful is departed.



ANDROMACHE 35

PYRRHUS.

Ay, they have had their troubles in the South.
Howbeit, with us you may stay in peace as long as
your pleasure is. Daughter of Helen, give your hand
to our guest, and guide him to the castle.

HERMIONE.

(Moving her hand forward, then drawing back.] Let
another guide him. I have yet a prayer unspoken,
and my offering is poured.

PYRRHUS.

(Displeased.} Be not vexed, stranger. Who can
tell the prayers of a childless woman, save that they
change and are very many ? Come with me, and
to-morrow we will ask your name and race.

[Exeunt PYRRHUS and ORESTES, L. The
PRIEST looks to the niches in the rock to see
the offerings. HERMIONE falls on her
knees at the altar, and prays silently.

END OF THE FIRST ACT.



THE SECOND ACT

SCENE : The Hall of PYRRHUS' Castle, a rude stone
building, with spears, swords, and armour hanging
on the walls. A doorway in the back wall leads
to the courtyard. At the extreme right is a fire
burning ; near it are two high seats for the King
and Queen.

On a bench near the door are ANDROMACHE and
MOLOSSUS seated ; on the floor near them is a
small pile of carpets and tapestries, and a bowl
with some metal ornaments and small weapons
in it.

ANDROMACHE.

But when you saw him fall, and saw the pain in
his face, did it give you no grief?

MOLOSSUS.

A little, it may be. Not more than when I struck
my first deer. A child might cry over the ox they
are flaying now in the yard.

ANDROMACHE.

And a grown man, too, if it availed anything.
36



ANDROMACHE 37

MOLOSSUS.

Mother, you are only a woman, and I am getting
to be a man ; I must grow past all that and throw it
behind me.

Enter ORESTES unnoticed : he stands in the doorway^
leaning against a pillar.

ANDROMACHE.

May your eyes never see half the pain mine have
seen ! I grew past feeling for it, too, long, long
ago. I saw men writhe and bite the dust, without
caring for them or counting them. They were so
many that they were all confused, and the noise of
their anguish was like the crying of cranes far off;
there was no one voice in it, and no meaning. And
then, as it went on growing, and the sons of Priam
died about me and the folk starved, and my husband,
Hector, was slain with torment, all the voices gathered
again together and seemed as one voice, that cried to
my heart so that it understood.

MOLOSSUS.
What did it say, Mother ?

ANDROMACHE.
It spoke in a language that you know not, my son.

MOLOSSUS.
Did it speak Trojan ?



38 ANDROMACHE

ANDROMACHE.

It spoke the language of old, old men, and those
whose gods have deserted them.

[ORESTES moves forward as though to speak,
but checks himself.

MOLOSSUS.
But you could tell me what it said.

ANDROMACHE.

(Looking at him, and not answering.) Why did you
ever wish to kill that herd-boy ?

MOLOSSUS.

We had taken their cattle before. They always
fight us.

ANDROMACHE.

Would it not be better that they should live at
peace with you ?

MOLOSSUS.

Why should I fear their blood-feud ? I would
sooner be slain than ask favours of them. My father
would avenge me well !

ANDROMACHE.

And who will be the happier ? Listen. Can you
hear that little beating sound down seaward, away
from the sun ?



ANDROMACHE 39

MOLOSSUS.
It is the water lapping against the rocks.

ANDROMACHE.

There is a sound like that in the language I told
you of. It is heard by old men and those whose
gods have deserted them the sound of all the blood
that men have spilt and the tears they have shed,
lapping against great rocks, in shadow, away from
the sun.

MOLOSSUS.
But, Mother, no warrior hears any sound like that.

ANDROMACHE.
Hector learnt to hear it before he died.

ORESTES.

(Coming forward.} Before he died ! Is that its
meaning ?

ANDROMACHE.
The stranger !

ORESTES.
Does it mean death, that sound ?

ANDROMACHE.

Nay, I think a man hears it when he has suffered
enough, if he has the right ear to hear it.



40 ANDROMACHE

ORESTES.

But it is then that death should come, when a man
has suffered enough.

ANDROMACHE.

Nay, death should not come for suffering. Death
should come when there is no hope left for any one
thing in the world.

ORESTES.
Any one thing !

MOLOSSUS.

But, Mother, they called Hector " Slayer of Men."
I want first to slay many, many men, and many wild
beasts, and burn a town, that people may fear me,
and call me " Slayer of Men." And after that after
that, I will be merciful, and slay only those I hate.

ANDROMACHE.
Shall you hate men still ?

MOLOSSUS.

If they wrong me ! (ANDROMACHE smiles,} Shall
I not hate them that wrong me ? Do you not your-
self?

ANDROMACHE.

Light of my age, if I hated, how should I live ?
There are three living souls that I love you and
your father and old Alcimus. And if I hated, whom
should I hate more bitterly ?



ANDROMACHE 41

MOLOSSUS.

I know my father was your enemy once. But
what did old Alcimus ?

ANDROMACHE.
He was one of the three who slew my little child.

MOLOSSUS.

Astyanax ? (She nods.} I wish Astyanax were
alive, mother. I would take him hunting. He
would have no share, would he, in my heritage ?

ANDROMACHE.
I know nothing of that.

MOLOSSUS.
And did you never hate them not at the time ?

ANDROMACHE.

(Looting at him, then passing her hand across her face.}
Oh yes, I hated them.

MOLOSSUS.
But not me ! I never did much harm to you.

ANDROMACHE.

Some day perhaps you will hurt me worse than any
of them ; but I shall not hate you.



42 ANDROMACHE

MOLOSSUS.

{After a pause, handling the objects in the bowl.)
Well, I give you my oath this time, Mother ; but I
will not atone for my next slaying.

Enter ALCIMEDON and Attendants.

ALCIMEDON.

The bull is finished, and a fine beast he was.
(Seeing the bowl.) What is this ?

MOLOSSUS.

(Shamefaced.) Nothing. Some pieces of mother's
old stores.

ANDROMACHE.
The price for the blood of the herd-boy.

MOLOSSUS.
She made me vow it.

ALCIMEDON.

The atonement ? That is right. I feared that
Pyrrhus would be too proud to pay it.

MOLOSSUS.
You need not think that / wanted him to pay it.



ANDROMACHE 43

ALCIMEDON.

H'm ! That was how / talked once, before I knew
what a blood-feud was. And now I would pay a
dead man's weight in silver to be clear of one. Of
course, with a stranger it is different, or a man who
has no kin. (Examining the stores.} No need to pay
too much, though. It was a little boy, they tell me,
and poorly clad.

MOLOSSUS.

(Almost crying.] He was twice as big as me ! I
hate the Napaeans, and I will slay more of them.



ALCIMEDON.

There are the oxen as well. We have killed two;
but sorry beasts, both, sorry beasts. Any two calves
will more than make up for them.

MOLOSSUS.



But I hate them !

ALCIMEDON.

Hate them your fill ; but make up the feud : we
must not have Pyrrhus left childless.

MOLOSSUS.

What is it to me if Pyrrhus is childless ? He can
avenge his children.

ALCIMEDON.
Peace is better.



44 ANDROMACHE

MOLOSSUS.
(Contemptuously.} Peace !

ORESTES.

And what is the road to peace ? The hate must
eat itself out, till it stays for weariness.

ALCIMEDON.

A long road, stranger, too long and too rough to
the feet. We want peace now .

ORESTES.

How can you get peace now, when the blood is
still wet ? He may give all his silver and his kine,
but he will hate the men whose blood he has drunk ;
and though they swear by all the gods of their valley,
they will hate him. And hate will out, in time, one
way or another.

MOLOSSUS.

If. ever they swerve a hair's breadth from their
oaths

ALCIMEDON.
And is there to be no peace at all ?

ORESTES.

Peace for this one (touching MOLOSSUS) when
Pyrrhus is childless, or when



ANDROMACHE 45

ALCIMEDON.
Your words on your own head !

ORESTES.
when the last of the Napaeans has gone from



the earth.

ANDROMACHE.
Nay ; no peace then.

ORESTES.
Not for the dead ?

ANDROMACHE.

Do not men see the dead roaming the world, and
hear them call for blood ?

ORESTES.

(Excitedly.} How know you, woman, that the Dead
call for blood ? (Gloomily again.} When the whole
of a race is gone there may perhaps be peace.

ANDROMACHE.

But the whole of a race is never gone. Even from
Troy there are men escaped who may make cities and
seek for vengeance again. And if you blot out all
the Napaeans, there are those beyond the Napaeans
who will hate you for that very thing. Make peace,
swiftly, before you die, my son, lest there be no peace
for ever and ever.



46 ANDROMACHE

Enter HERMIONE, with PRIEST of Thetis, and Attend-
ants ; she is richly dressed, and her eyes bright and
anxious. She passes up to the two high seats, and
takes one. She talks with her MAIDS, and ALCI-
MEDON goes over to her.

ORESTES.

(Detaching another pendant from his chain.) Woman,
you can see men's hearts, and you talk not as these
talk. Behold, there is no peace, for peace is nothing ;
there is either Love or Hate. ( Throwing the pendant
into the bowl.} If gold can buy love where hate is,
put that to the blood-gift.

HERMIONE.

(To ORESTES, across the hall.) Sir Stranger, this
Priest tells me you are skilled as a bard.

ORESTES.

I have little skill in music, but I have journeyed
much.

HERMIONE.
You can tell us strange tales of your voyages ?

ORESTES.

Not of my own. But I was telling this boy a tale
even now.



ANDROMACHE 47

HERMIONE.

Nay, no boys' tales ! Andromache, take your son
and help with the ox flesh. (To ORESTES.) And sit
not so far off, among the slaves' 1 seats. Tell us some
man's story.

ORESTES.

(Approaching) but bringing MOLOSSUS with him, while
ANDROMACHE goes out.) Nay, I will keep the boy.
It is a boy's tale, this, and of little meaning. But

seeing I have begun (To MOLOSSUS.) Have

you heard of a man that once had a great feud
Orestes, Agamemnon's son ?



MOLOSSUS.
Who slew his mother, and was driven by-



PRIEST.

Nay, name them not, child, name not those Holy
Ones.

ALCIMEDON.

We love not his name in this house, stranger.
Have you no other tale ?



HERMIONE.

(Controlling her excitement.) Nay, what hurt is his
name ? It is only a tale.



48 ANDROMACHE

ORESTES.

He took on him a great feud, greater than he knew.
For his father called from the dead for vengeance on
the woman who had murdered him. And the gods
called, too, and put voices always about him calling
for blood. And then they betrayed him.

MOLOSSUS.
Did his father betray him, too ?

ORESTES.

Nay, it may be that the voice was not his father's,
after all. But the gods

PRIEST.
See that your tongue offend not, stranger !

ORESTES.

So be it. Well, in the end he recked not of the
gods. He cared not how sore they hated him, and
cared not if he lived or died.

MOLOSSUS.
And what did he do ?

ORESTES.

This is the last story I heard of him, from a
Chalcidian man who had been in Sicily.



ANDROMACHE 49

HERMIONE.
Had he gone so far away ?

ORESTES.

Beyond the end of Sicily, and to and fro ; and at
last to some wild kingdom ... I know not where it
was ; let us say a kingdom of the Iberians. For he
vowed that he would be like Paris, and win the most
beautiful of all women for his wife ; for, you must
know, the gods had marred all the world for him, and
made it all as ashes in his mouth, except beauty. For
beauty is immortal, like themselves ; and they cannot
hurt it. So he sought and questioned where that
woman might be ; and men said she was queen among
the Iberians.

HERMIONE.

(Half divining his meaning.} Had he seen her him-
self?

ORESTES.
Ay, long ago, they said.

HERMIONE.
And did he too deem her so fair ?

ORESTES.

More beautiful than the flowers and the sunlight,
so that in dreams her eyes haunted him.

D



50 ANDROMACHE

MOLOSSUS.
Well, and what did he do ?

ORESTES.

He took his ship, with a hundred men well armed,
and hid them in a bay of Iberia. And he went up
alone to the king's castle and saw the woman. For
he was not sure if she was really so beautiful, and
wanted to see her again very close. So he stayed in
the king's house and made a plot to bear her away.

\A slight pause.

MOLOSSUS.
But what happened ?

ORESTES.

No one knows. The Chalcidian could never hear
what had happened. Some said he won the queen to
his ship, and fled away, wandering ; and some said
she told the king of his plotting, and they slew him
there in the banquet hall. ... So perchance even
Orestes has found his peace ; and perchance he is still
an outcast man, with a new feud following him.

MOLOSSUS.
But I wish I knew.

ORESTES.
Aye, 'tis a lame story, without an ending.



ANDROMACHE 51

HERMIONE.

(Breaking out from her suspense ; recklessly.) And a
poor fool, your Orestes, whatever befell !

ORESTES.
How so ? What if he won the woman ?

HERMIONE.

He only fled on the seas with her, an exiled man,
with no comfort. Could he not get him a kingdom ?

ORESTES.

Belike he cared not for a little kingdom, being once
robbed of his own great kingdom.

HERMIONE.

If a high seat is empty, shall not a great king's son
be bold to sit on it ? Were his men good soldiers
of Mycenae ?

ORESTES.

Some, of Mycenae, who had sacked Troy ; some,
pirates he had got in his voyaging ; all good fighters !

HERMIONE.

Could he not slay that Iberian in his halls, and sit
upon his seat ?

ALCIMEDON.
By Thetis ! that would have been a gallant deed.



52 ANDROMACHE

PRIEST.

Unrighteous, very unrighteous ; but doubtless the
Iberian would have sinned against some god.

ORESTES.

The Iberians may be brave fighters ; I know not.
And he knew of none to help him.

ALCIMEDON.
A hundred good Phthians might have tried it.

HERMIONE.

The queen might have had her own friends who
would fight for her.

ALCIMEDON.

A very foul deed, very foul ; but a gallant one !
And if she would leave her lord the hound ! she
might well help to slay him.

ORESTES.

He did not seek her for her righteousness ; he sought
her because her beauty spoke like a god to him.

\A moment's pause. A shout of several voices
heard in the Court.

ALCIMEDON.
What is that shouting ?

[Moves towards door, with MOLOSSUS ; the
PRIEST follows.



ANDROMACHE 53

HERMIONE.

I heard the King's voice in it. (To her MAIDS.)
Go, quick. See what has happened. (They also go
towards the door, leaving HERMIONE and ORESTES alone.
An instant of silence ; then she makes a quick movement
to him.) Oh, speak !

ORESTES.

Either I will take you this night or I will be slain
here in the hall.

HERMIONE.

Oh, take me, take me ! I am half dead with
wearying.

ORESTES.

You shall weary no more. Go forth alone at mid-
night to the altar of Thetis

HERMIONE.
The altar of Thetis by night ? [She shows fear.

ORESTES.

What do you fear ? (HERMIONE shudders, but does
not answer.} You dare not ? Then, let it end the
other way !

HERMIONE.
Dare you slay him ?

ORESTES.
That is no great thing.



54 ANDROMACHE

HERMIONE.

And the witch, and the witch-child ?

[With frightened ferocity.

ORESTES.
Slay her ?

HERMIONE.

You will not ? You will not ? . . . Oh, then, I
dare not go to you !

[ORESTES looks at her with surprise and some
repulsion ; the women and ALCIMUS re-
turn^ followed by PYRRHUS and MOLOSSUS,
with some armour : after them ANDRO-
MACHE and some retainers.

MAID.

A gift for Molossus ! The King has given him
a helmet and shield and spear !

MOLOSSUS.
And greaves, too, with bronze rims !

PYRRHUS.

Not yet, my boy ! (As MOLOSSUS would fit a greave
on.) Bad luck before a banquet.

ALCIMUS.
Wait till the morning, my lad !



ANDROMACHE 55

PYRRHUS.

(With sudden displeasure^ seeing the blood-gifts.} What
mean all these carpets, and the bowl yonder ?

ANDROMACHE.
They are gifts for the atonement.

PYRRHUS.
Atonement to those dogs ?

ANDROMACHE.
My King, it was the boon you granted me.

PYRRHUS.

(Turning towards MOLOSSUS.) The boy never con-
sented ?

MOLOSSUS.

I verily I liked it not but I gave my word.
Mother made me.

PYRRHUS.

You have just slain a man, and a woman can
frighten you to promising your own dishonour ?

MOLOSSUS.

She did not frighten me ; she I know not how
she did it.



56 ANDROMACHE

HERMIONE.

(With a laugh.') Others can guess well enough how
she did it.

FIRST MAID.
{Muttering.) Sorceress !

SECOND MAID.
(The same.) Phrygian witch !

ALCIMUS.
Hold your peace, little prating foxes !

FIRST MAID.

Oh, we all know she has witched old Alcimedon,
long ago.

MOLOSSUS.

(Half crying, as PYRRHUS stands gloomily silent.) I
would not make atonement to them, Father, for the
world !

PYRRHUS.

She has your word now, little fool ; and mine
likewise. By the gods, woman, you have got your
will, and shamed me in the eyes of all men.

ANDROMACHE.

Master, your honour is more to me than mine own.
This thing shames you not ; even Alcimedon deemed
it wise and honourable.



ANDROMACHE 57

ALCIMUS.

The boy is very young ; if he were a man, be-
like

HERMIONE.
Is Alcimedon the judge of his lord's honour ?

ANDROMACHE.

But how should I ever seek to hurt your honour ?
Why should I wish it ?

PRIEST.

(ds PYRRHUS goes silently back to the throne.) A
barbarian woman never forgets a hurt.

FIRST MAID.
'Tis the spite of a conquered Phrygian.

HERMIONE.

Let her be, King ! She is thinking ever of her
Hector, and Astyanax whom you slew.

ANDROMACHE.

My lord

PYRRHUS.

Peace, peace ! She knows well enough that Hector
is dead and beyond the seas too. Though I were
shamed to the dirt in mine own hall, Hector would
not hear of it.



58 ANDROMACHE

HERMIONE.

Are you sure ?

PRIEST.

Hector himself is buried beyond the seas, but his
ghost may have followed your ships to Phthia.
(Coming up to the throne.] Yea, son of Achilles,
though you like not my counsel, there be witches in
Phrygia that can wake the dead, and tell them of


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Online LibraryGilbert MurrayAndromache, a play in three acts → online text (page 2 of 4)