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Grace G. Montgomery.

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-1



THE



MODEL ETYMOLOGY.



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THE MODEL WOBD BOOK. Ho. 2.



THE



MODEL ETYMOLOaT,

WITH

SENTENCES

SHOWING THE CORRECT USE OF WORDS;

AITS A

K^ Y.

GIVING THE ANALYSIS OF ENGLISH WORDa



By a. 0. WEBB.

tBIROIPAl or lAHI BIBXII SBAIIIIAB SOH^M.




Iwrfeenth Jirxfion,



PHILADELPHIA:
ELDREDGE <& BROTHER,

No. 17 North Seventh StrooUg^ , GoOqIc
187 8. " " ^



Qimrn OF VHs Contbollsrs of Pubuo Schools^
Fint District of Pennsylvania.

PhOadelphta, October 12, 1867.

At a meeting of the CSontrollers of Public Schools, First District of Pennsyl.
rania,held at the Controllers' Chamber, October 7th, 1867, the following ResoluUo?
was adopted:

" Resolved, That the * Model Definer ' and the ' Model Etymology ' be added to
the list of text-books.*'

From the Minutes:

H. W. Halliwzll, Secretary.



Orwvm or tu Oommxssioitx&s of Pubuo Schools,
^ BalUmare, AprU 29, 1868.

▲t a meeting of the Commissioners of Public Schools, held this date, the follow-
M^ hesolation was onanimoosly adopted:
^Betoboedt That Webb*s * Model Etymology' be adopted for use in the Pablio
■ in this d^.**

Attest, H. M. CowLss, iSberetoiy.



yys^jf-



Entered ao«or(ling to Act of Congress, in the year 1867, by

A. C. WEBB,

in the Qerk's OfBce of the District Court of the United States for th«

Eastern District of Pennsylvania.



^



-u'w



J. PAOAX k BOX,
BTIRIOTTPEBS, PHILAB'A. ^-^






OAZTOW PBE88 OF
IBBEMAW k 00., PHZLADBIPBII.



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1 •






PREFACE.
IHE "MODEL WOBD-BOOE" SERIE&

CONSISTING OF -^

NO. 1. MODEL DEFINER, FOR BEGINNERS.

NO. 2. MODEL ETYMOLOGY, UNIFORM WITH NO. L



Thb importance of Words cannot be over-estiinated. Edncatioa
flepends on a knowledge of the meaning and application of Words.
Knowledge can be imparted and received only by the medium of
WORDS, correctly used and properly understood. The basis of a good
education must be laid with words, well chosen, properly arranged,
and firmly implanted in the mind.

From the richness of the English Language, which gives many words
to the same meaning, and many and diverse meanings to the same
word, the proper we of a word cannot be deduced from its meaning.
How, then, is the knowledge of the use of words to be imparted to
children? Either by the teacher, or by conversation and reading.
By the latter method, the knowledge acquired is limited in extent ;
and as it is entirely dependent on the power of observation, the im-
pressions received are faint and ill-defined, and the conclusions arrived
at frequently incorrect.

No teacher woiild think of teaching Arithmetic, by simply impart-
ing the Rules, and then leaving to the child their correct application.
Yet, the practice of Arithmetic might possibly be left to such teaching,
inasmuch as Arithmetic is an exact science based on fixed principles,
from which correct reasoning must deduce correct results. But no rea-
soning can show to the child, who has learned ** Deduce, to draw," that
he must not say, " I tried to deduce the horse from the stable ; " or,
*^ Deciduous, falling.** " The boy deciduous from the window, was killed."

These ore the errors of untrained children ; but the laughable mis*
takes of intelligent foreigners, when they attempt to eombine wordi

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Tl PBEFAOE.

according to their meaning, is conclusiye proof of the proposition
that, The only way hy which the use of a word can he taught, is to
giye a sentence in which the word is correctly used. Even in his
▼emacular, an educated man would not use a word, which he had
neither seen in writing, nor heard from the lips of a good speaker.
Take, for instance, Uhdal, relating to letters of a large size ; Interea^
late, to insert: Fiduciary , firm, — what intelligent man would use these
words, simply because he knew their meaning ? How unjust and use*
less, then, to demand of an ignorant and untrained childy that which
no adi^lt can give ; namely, the correct use of a word deriyed from its
meaning only.

Some teachers, convinced by experience of the necessity of illus-
tratiye sentences, require children to procu-re them at home. But the
importance and difficulty of the work demand, that it should not be left
to the uncertainties of home teaching. The labor inyolved forbids that
this essential part of education should be imposed on the parent. Like
Arithmetic, or any other department of knowledge, it should be per-
formed by the teacher, in the time specially set apart for mental
training.

The plan adopted in the *< Model Wobd-Book Series '' is not new.
All good Dictionariee illustrate the meaning by a Model, To quote
from a good author, a sentence containing the word, as proof of its
correct use, is the only authority allowed.

A simple trial of the work, either by requiring the child to form
sentences similar to those given, or by memorizing the sentences as
models for future use, will convince any one of the following

ADVANTAGES TO BE DERIVED FROM THE "MODEL WORD-
BOOK" SERIES. *

1. Saving of time. 2. Increased knowledge of words. 8. Ease to
teacher and scholar. 4. A knowledge of the correct use of words.



A KEY,

eontainlng the Analysis of every word, which could present any diffi'
oulties to the learner, is appended.



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THE MODEL WORD BOOK. No. 2. "^



THE

MODEL ETYMOLOGY.

PART L

DEFINITIONS.

Etymology is the science, which treats of the origin and derivatioA
of words.

A prefix is a syllable placed before a root ; as, tn, not, in inarable,
not arable (or capable of being tilled) ; eon, withy or together, in connect,
to tie together,

A root is the radical or essential part of a word ; as, aot-um in action,
ann-us in annual.

A 8ufflx is a syllable placed afier a root; as, ant, one who; tenant,
one who holds ; ize, to make; fertilize, to make fertile.

I. PREFIXES,

OF LATIN AND SAXON OBIQIN

AB, (with the form a,) signifies /row or away; absolye, avert

ABS, signifies /rom or away; abstract.

AB, (with the forms a, ae, af, ag, al, am, an, ap, ar, as, at,) signifief
<o; advert, asdribe, acclaim, affix, aggrieve, allude, ammunition, an-
nex, apportion, arrogate, assign, attain.

AM, (with the form amb,) signifies round, or about; amputate,
ambition.

AKTE, (with the form anti,) signifies before; antecedent, anticipate^

BE, signifies to make; befit.

CIEGTJM, signifies round, or about; circumspect.

CON, (with the forms eo, eog^ eol, com, eor,) signifies with or together;
connect, cohere, cognizance, colleague, compact, correct.

CONTBA, (with the forms counter, contro,) signifies againei; contra-
dict, oonntermand, controvert.

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8 THE MODEL EiTYMOLOaY.

DE eignifies downy or from; deduct.

DIS, (with the forms di, di/y) signifies : 1. asundeff 2. apart, 8. awap; U
differ, 2. divide, 8. dispeL

DIS signifies not; disbelieye.

EN signifies: 1. tn, 2. ony 8. into, 4. not; 1. entrap, 2. engraye, 8
entomb, 4. enemy.

EX, (with the forms «, ec, e/,) signifies out; exclude, emit, eestasji
efflux.

EXTBA signifies beyond; eztiAordinarj.

IN, (with the forms t^, t7, trriy ir,) signifies: 1. th, 2. on, 8. into, 4.
no^; 1. inject, 2. impress, 8. illusiinate, 4. ignoble.

INTER, (with the forms enter, intely) signifies between, among; inter-
ine, entertain, intellect.

INTBO signifies within ; introduce.

MIS signifies wrong, erroneows; 1. misconduct, 2. misconception.

NEG signifies not; neglect.

NON signifies not; nonsense (no sense).

OB, (with the forms o, oCy of, op, osy) signifies : 1. in the wat/y 2. agatntt^
8. out; 1. obstruct, 2. oppose, 8. obviate.

PEBf (with the forms pel, pol,) signifies through, thoroughly; peram-
bulate, pellucid, pollute.

POST signifies after ; postscript.

PBE signifies before ; precede.

PEO, (with the forms /;or,/?wr,/?rtt,) signifies: l.for, 2. forth, Z, for*
ward, 4. out; 1. pronoun, 2. profuse, 8. promote, 4. protract; portray,
pursue, prudent.

PBETEB signifies beyond; preternatural.

BE, (with the form red,) signifies: 1. backy 2. again, 8. anew; 1. re*
press, 2. re-elect, 8. recommend.

BETBO signifies backwards; retrograde.

SE signifies: 1. aside, 2. apart; 1. secede, 2. seclude.

SINE, (with the forms sim, «m,) signifies without; sinecure, simply,
sincere.

STTB, (with the forms su, sue, sufy sug, sum, sup, sur, sus,) signifies under;
inspect, iucceed, suffer, suggest, summon, support, surreptitious, sustain.

SUBTEIt signifies under; subterfuge.

SUPER, (with the form tar,) signifies : 1. above, 2. over, 8. more than
mough; 1. supernatural, 2. supervise, 8. superfluous; surmount

TBANS, (with the form tra,) signifies: 1. over, 2. through, 8. h^^
pond; I. transgress, 2. transparent, 8. transmarine.

UN (Saxon) signifies: 1. to deprive of, 2. not; 1. uncrown, 2, unable

UNBEB (Saxon) signifies beneath, under; underrate.

WITH (Saxon) signifies ^om or against; withstand.



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II. SUFFIXES,
OF LATIN AND SAXON ORIGIN.

AC signifies of, btlongin^, relating, or pertaining to; demoniae.

ACEOUS signifies: 1. o/, 2. contitting of^ 8. like, or retembling; 1 eet%
eeons, 2. foliaceous, 8. saponaceous.

ACY signifies: 1. being, 2. state of being, 8. office of; 1. accuraej^ X
lunacy, 8. magistracy.

AGE signifies : 1. a coUeetion of, 2. being, or state of being, 8. an aUow*
ancefor ; 1. foliage, 2. peerage, 8. wharfage.

AL signifies : 1. o/, belonging, relating, or pertaining to, 2. bating or
becoming ; 1. personal, 2. paternal.

AN, or IAN, signifies : 1. one who, or the person that, 2. of, belonging^
relating, or pertaining to; 1. artisan, 2. Christian, human.

AKCE, or ANCY, (ENGE, or ENCY,) signifies: 1. being, or state of
being, 2. *ing*; 1. vigilance, constancy, 2. acceptance, vagrancy.

ANT signifies: 1. one who, or the person that, 2. ^ing*; 1. assail-
ant, 2. abundant

AB signifies: 1. one who, 2. o/, belonging, relating, or pertaining to, 8.
having; 1. scholar, 2. circular, 8. muscular.

ABB (^axon) signifies one who; drunkard.

ABY signifies : 1. one who, or the person that, 2. of, belonging, relating,
or pertaining to, 8. the place where, 4. the thing that; 1. adversary,
2. epistolary, 8. library, 4. boundary.

ATE signifies: 1. one who, or the person that, 2. having, being, 8. to
make, to give, to put, or to take; 1. curate, 2. corporate, adequate, 3. as-
similate, animate, illuminate, exonerate.

BLE, ABLE, or IBLE, signifies : 1. may be, 2. can be, 8. worthy of, 4.
fit to be; 1. visible, 2. portable, 3. contemptible, 4. eligible.

CLE, or CCLE, signifies little, or small; canticle, corpuscle, animal-
cule.

DOM (Saxon) signifies: 1. the place where, 2. stats of being; .1. duke*
dom, 2. freedom.

EE signifies: 1. one who, 2. one to whom; 1. absentee, 2. assignee.

EEB signifies, one who, or the person that; mountaineer.

EN signifies: 1. made of, 2. to make; 1. wooden, 2. shorten.

ENCE, or ENCY, (ANCE, or ANCY,) signifies: 1. being, or stats of
being, 2. Ung*; 1. impudence, innocency, 2. confluence, refulgeney.

ENT signifies: 1. one who, or the person that, 2. being, or ing; h
student, 2. equivalent, pendent

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10 THE MODEL ETYMOLOGy.

EB signifies: 1. one who, or the person that, 2. (hinff which; 1. teacher,
2. chapter.
ESCENCE signifies ttate of growing or becoming; conTaleiee&oe.
ESCENT signifies ^roirz;?^ or ^tfcomin^; convalescent.
ET signifies /iV^/0, or email; closet.
FUL (Saxon) signifies /uZZ of; carefuL
FY" signifies to make ; magnify.

IC, or ICLL, signifies, of, belonging, relating^ or pertaining to ; rustio,
poetical.

ICE signifies: 1. the thing that, 2. the quality of; 1. noticOi 2. cow-
ardice.

ICS signifies: 1. the doctrine, or science of 2. art of; 1. ethics, 2. pjro-
techuics.

ID signifies: 1. being, 2. *ing,* 3. the thing that; 1. acrid, 2. splen-
did, a. fiuid.

ILE signifies : 1. belonging, relating, or pertaining to, 2. may or can
be, 3. easily; 1. hostile, 2. ductile, 3. docile.
INE signifies of belonging, relating, or pertaining to; marine.
ION signifies': 1. the act of 2. being, or state of being, 3. *ing*; 1. ex-
pulsion, 2. corruption, 3. friction.

ISE, or IZE, sigaifics: 1. to make, 2. to give; 1. fertilize, 2. charac-
terize.

ISH signifies: 1. somewhat, 2. belonging to, 8. like, 4. to make; 1.
blackish, 2. Spanish, 3. boyish, 4. publish.

ISM signifies: 1. being, or state of being, 2. an idiom, 3. doctrine of; 1.
barbarism, 2. anglicism, 3. Calvinism.
1ST signifies one who, or the person that; novelist.
ITE signifies one who, or the person that; having, ing.
ITY, or TY, signifies being, or state of being ; ability.
IVE signifies : 1. one who, or the person that, 2. having power, 8. that
tan, 4. '■ing*; 1. captive, 2. persuasive, 3. corrective, 4. progressive.
LET signifies little, or small; rivulet.
LESS (Saxon) signifies tt't^Aot^; artless.
LIKE (Saxon) signifies like, or resembling; manlike.
LY (Saxon), for LIKE, signifies: 1. like, or resembling, 2, in a manner
or way ; 1. princely, 2. abruptly.

MENT signifies : 1. being, or state of being, 2. act of, 3. the thing
that; 1. abasement, 2. accomplishment, 3. inducement.

UONY signifies: 1. being, or state of being, 2. thing that; 1. acri-
mony, 2. testimony.

NESS (Saxon) signifies : 1. being, or state of being, 2. quality of being ; 2.
remoteness, 2. acuteness.

OB signifies: 1. one who; 2. the act of, ing; 8. sensation; 4. that which
tauses; — 1. captor, 2. favor, 3. color, 4. motor.



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11



OBY signifies: 1. the place where, 2. ihinff that, 8. of, belonging, relat*
ing, or pertaining to, *ing* ; 1. armory, 2. memory) 3. consolatory, tran-
sitory.

OSE signifies /mW of; jocose.

OUS signifies : 1. full of, 2. consisting of, 8. belonging to, 4. given to,
6. * ing *; 1. populous, 2. aqueons, 8. cutaneous, 4. contentions, 5. te-
nacious.

EY (Saxon) signifies: 1. a being, 2.Jheariof,^theplacej(^here;l»
bravery, 2. casuistry, 3. ferry. " ^

SHIP (Saxon) signifies : 1. the office of, 2. the state of; 1. clerk-
ihip, 2. apprenticeship.

SOME (Saxon) signifies : 1. somewhat, 2. fitll of; 1. wearisome, 2.
frolics>)me.

STEK (Saxon) signifies one who ; songster.

TUBE, or UDE, signifies being j or state of being; multitude, quietude.

TILE signifies little, or small; globule.

XJEE signifies: 1. the thing, 2. being, or state of being, 8. act of;
1. picture, 2. composure, 8. departure.

Y signifies : I. the being, state of being, 2. * ing,* 3. full of, 4. covered
with, 5. consisting of; 1. anarchy, 2. antipathy, 8. healthy, 4. flowery,
5. chalky.



RECAPITULATION OF SUFFIXES.



1. BEING, OR STATE OP BEING.



Acy,
Age,
Ance, or ancy ;

ence, or ency,
Ion,
Ism,
Ity, or ty.



as accuracy,
peerage.

yigilance.
corruption,
barbarism,
ability.



Ment,

Mony,

Ness,

Tude, or ude,

Ure,

Y,



as abasement,
acrimony,
remoteness,
multitude,
picture,
anarchy.



2. BELONGING, RELATING, OR PERTAINING TO.



Ao,

Al,

An, or ian,

Ar,

Ary,



as demoniac,
personal,
human,
circular,
epistolary.



Ic, leal,
He,
Ine,
Ory,



as poetical,
hostile,
marine,
consolatory.



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T9B^ MODJS^


■j^bOLOQT



••






8. ONE WHO, OR THE PEESON THAT.


An, or


ian,


as artisan.


Ent,


as studeAt.*


Ant,




assailant.


Er,


teacher.


Ar,

Ard,

Ary,

Ate, ,

Ee,

Eer,




scholar,
druiikari."
adversary!
curate,
absentee,
mountaineer.


Ist,
Ite.
Ive,
Or,
Ster,


novelist

favorite.

captive.

captor.

songster.






4. TO MAKE.




Ate,




as assimilate.


Ise, or ize,


as fertilise.


En,


#


shorten,
magniiy.


Ish,


publish.






6. LITTLE, OR SMALL.




Cle, or


oole.


as animalcule. Ule,


as globule.


Et,




closet

6. MAY, OR CAN BE.




Able, 01


•ible,


as visible. He,


as ductile.


Ble,




audible. Ive,



7. LIKE, OR RESEMBLING.


corrective.


Aceous,




as saponaoeous. Like,
boyish. Ly,


as manlike,
princely.


Escence,
Escent, g


. 8.
state of growing or becoming,
rowing or becoming.


convalescence,
convalescent



9. MISCELLANEOUS.



Horn, state of being, as freedom.
Id, thing that, fluid.

Ice, thing that, notice.

Ics, the doctrine, ethics.

Less, without, ax^tst.



Ose, full of, as jocose.

Ry, a^lace where, ferry.
Ship, the office of, clerkship.
Some, somewhat, weaiisome«



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MISCELLANEOUS EXERCISES

IK PBEFIXES AKD STTPFIXES.



WORDS DEFINED IN BOOK NO, 1.



Aente, sharp.

Act, to behave.

Action, a perfonuanoe.

Agent, one intrasted with th# busi-
ness of another.

Damage, injury.

Exact, accurate.

Manage, to carry on.

Exalt, to raise up.

Animal, a living creature.

Apt, quick of apprehension.

Author, a writer of a book, Ac

Captain, a leader.

Chapter, a division of a book.

Accuse, to charge with a crime.

Excuse, to pardon.

Cave, a hollow place.

Certain, sure.

Exclaim, to cry out.

Clear, bright

Recline, to lean back.

Reconcile, to conciliate again.

Courage, boldness.

Discord, disagreement

Crown, the head ornament worn by

kings.
Creditor, one to whom money is

due.
Creation, the act of creating.
Creator, Ood, the maker of all things.
Increase, to augment
Decrease, to grow less.
Cruel, hard-hearted.
Cross, peevish.

Cracify to put to death on % erosi.
2



Cure,, a remedy.

Addition, increase.

Double, consisting of two. *^

Perish, to die. ^

Family, the body of persons who lire

in a house under one head or man*

age#
Confess, to acknowledge.
Honest, upright
I<atilade, distance from the eqnatof

either north or south. ^. *
Majestic, stately.
Remnant, residue.
Mariner, a seaman..
Mention, to speak ofl
Morsel, a small piece of food.
Amuse, to divert
Kavy, the war-vessels, taken eollee-

tively, belon^i^ng to the government
Annexed, united to at the end.
Pair, a couple.
Disappear, to vanish.
Pasture, ground where cattle may

graze. *

Peculiar, singular.
Depend, trust to. ^

Repeat, o recite.
Picture, a painting.

f displease, to offend,
lenty, abuirdance.
Politth, brighten.
Pound, 16 or 12 onnces.
Prison, a place of oonfinement
Priee, value.
Coont, to reokon.

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14



THB MODEL KTYMOLOQT.



Primer, a child's first book.

Request, to entreat.

Qaiet, at rest.

Erase, to mb oat.

Bazor, an instrument for sbaying.

Aavage, to lay waste.

Arrive, to come to.

P.ival, a competitor.

Kude, rough.

Salmon, a fish.

Safe, free fiom danger.

Salutation, a greeting.

Ascend, to go up.

Descend, to go down.

Scissors, small shears.

Section, a part.

Insect, a small animal.

Seminary, a school.

Sensible, intelligent.

Deserve, to merit.

Obsenre, to watch.

JDissolve, to melt.

Disperse, to scatter.

Space, room.

Strict, exact

Straight, not crooked.

Tempest, storm.



Detention, confinement.

Detest, to abhor.

Text, a passage o^ Scripture used af

the subject of a discourse.
Timid, fearful.
Tremble, to shake.
Distribute, to divide among two or

more.
Tutor, a teacher.
Tomb, a grave.
Tumult, a commotion.
Umbrella, a shade carried ia tht

hand.
Unite, to join.
Union, a joining.
Abuse, to use improperly.
Misuse, to treat badly.
Valiant, brave.
Convey, to carry.
Veil, a curtain.
Vest, to put in possession of.
Veteran, an old soldier.
Convinced, persuaded.
Vanquish, to conquer.
Revive, to live again.
Survive, to outlive.
Vivid, bright



MISCELLANEOUS EXERCISES

UHDEB LATIN VEBBS.



WORDS DEFINED AND COMBINED IN BOOK NO. L



Atn^o, I love.
Amiable, worthy to be loved.
Enemy, a foe.

Cad^, I fall
Cascade, a waterfall.
Accident, that which happens un-
foreseen.
Decay, to fall away.



Capi^fliake.

Deceive to cheat.
Captive, a prisoner.

Ced-^, I yield, I go ataaf
Cease, stop.
Cede, to give up.
Exceed, to go beyond.
Precede, to go before.



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MISOELLANEOIJS EXERCISES.



15



Proceed, to go forward.

Recess, a place or time of retreat.

Curr~o, I run.
Concur, to agree.
Occurred, happened.

Dioo, I tat/.
Dictionary, a book containing the
words of a language.

DUC-^, Head,
Deduct, subtract.
Duke, a noble.
Introduce, to usher in.
Inducement, motive.

jfoci-O, IdOf I make.
Difficult, hard to be done.

Flu^, I flow.
Fluid, anything that flows.

Fru-'Or, I enjoy.

Fruit, the part of a plant that con-
tains the seed.
Chradi^or, Itakestepty I walk.

Congress, an assembly of legisla-
tors.

JUitt^f I tend.

Admission, admittance.

Dismissed, sent away.

Omit, to leave out.

riio^, I fold.
Display, to show.
Simple, plain.

Fan^o, I put, I place.
Composed, wrote.
Impostor, a deceiver.

2*or«-o,/ctffiy.
Porter, a carrier.



Frem-^, Iprett.
Press, urge.

Iteg~Of I direct, I rule.

Correct, right.
Directly, immediately.
Rector, a pastor.
Right, correct.
Incorrect, wrong.

Speci'-Of Hook, I tee.
Despise, to look down upon with

contempt.
Respect, regard.
Respectable, worthy of regard.

Spir~0, I breathe.
Perspire, to send out n^isture by
the skin.
Sfru^, I build, leonttruct.
Instruct, to teach.
Instrument, a tool.
Obstruct, to hinder.

Tend-Of Ittretch.
Tent, a C9vering stretched on
poles.

Trah'Of I draw.
Track, a path. -
Subtract, deduot. ' /'

Veni-o^ I come.
Avenue, a street.
Convene, to assemble.


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Online LibraryGrace G. MontgomeryModern auction: in ten lessons → online text (page 1 of 16)