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associations have realized the universal importance of the work and
have also subscribed towards it.

In this connexion U.M. Embassy reports that the German
Home OflBce Estimates last year included for the first time a sum
(2,500Z.) to be devoted to the- promotion of cotton cultivation, and
it is said that a similar sum will appear in this year's estimates,
and will be devoted to the financing of an exhibition of machines
used in the cultivation of cotton, to be held in April next.
Cotton gins and cotton presses are to be exhibited with a view to
Crerman machinery makers seeing them and learning to build
them for themselves. There was an idea of exhibiting cotton also,
but this was given up on the ground that the excellence of the
cotton produced in the German Colonies is already universally
recognized, and] it is now merely a question of doing everytiiing
possible to increase the production.



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Dec ae, 1907.] THE BOAED OP TBABE JOUBNAL. 605



TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL CONDITIONS IN POLAND.

A despatch has been received at the Foreign Office from H.M.
Oonsnl-General at Warsaw (Mr. A. P. Murray) reporting on the
condition of trade and industry in Poknd in October last,* from
which the following particulars are extracted: —

" The metallurgical industry is still in a very bad way, and the
prospects for the future are very gloomy.

"Apart from the trouble with the workers common to all
industries in Poland, the demand for iron has decreased and the
cost of production increased on account of the higher price of ftiel.
To this must be added the great difficulty and frequent impossi-
bility of getting coke regularly and in sufficient quantities from
Silesia, whence it all has to be imported.

'* The demand for iron for construction works, machine works
and various metal factories, for want of new orders, is not more
than 45 per cent, of the usual amount. It is hoped that next year
the Vistula railway will place considerable orders for rails and
bridges, but nothing certain is yet known. A Warsaw firm
secured the orders for the iron work required for three new sugar
factories built this year in the provinces, and factories which make
iron for bedsteads have been able to keep going on orders from
Central Russia.

" Iron dealers have ceased to stock iron and only order as orders
are placed with them. Such ironworks as are not shut down are
working only three or four days a week.

" The production of the difierent ironworks in Poland during
the first siJT months of the year was not much less than during the
first six months of last year, but one-third of their production
remained in stock.

** There has been a considerable export lately to Germany of
waste from the difierent works containing a certain percentage of
ore which the Polish works did not think it worth while to extract,
but which now is being exported to Grermany to the works there.

"A heavy burden on all industry in Poland, already nearly
•crushed by the increased cost of labour, is the high price of coal
and the practical certainty that it will in future be even still
higher. The reason'fbr this is that the Warsaw- Vienn^a railway
has hitherto been permitted to charge a higher rate for the carriage
of coal than the other railways in the Empire. These other rail-
ways having now obtained permission to charge the same rate as
the Warsaw-Vienna railway, this latter has in its turn applied for
permission to still further advance its rates, and it is stated on
good authority that the Ministry of Finance have promised to give
their consent. Hitherto the Warsaw-Vienna railway was the only
one ki the Empire which was not run at a loss, butit hasnot paid
a dividend for the last two years and shows no prospects of being

♦ For Mr. Murray's previous report see " BoMd of Trade Jonnuil *' of
'.J , lit Angurt, lf07, pp. 2134^.. /. ^ •



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Tfode ^iiind^^hukukiid OondUim^m^ Poland* >



able to do 00 this year, Fmctioally «I1 the remainder ot,ih^ mi^
ways in the country belonging to. the Crown, the Ministry can only
welcome an increase of tariff which would .SfEWewbatdimjjush. the
loss on their exploitatioii^ SO:. there is no hope, that the t^yrifffn^
coal may be reduced again.

*' For the above reason the mines prefer to send coal from
Dombrowa by the Vistula rather than the Vienna railway, another
reason being that the Vistula railway carries the coal in closed
trucks whereas the Vienna railway carries it on open trucks horn
which theft is 8ystematic» truc^ not infrequently uriving at
Warsaw minus 1 per cent, of their load.

" The price of coal for domestic purposes in Poland is thi^ year
higher than ever and will be the cause of great suffering^ amopgst
the poorer classes of the population during the winter. . The reason
of this is not the want of coal but simply tjie action of speculators
who control the supply of coal to the principal towns. Various
attempts haye been made by the authorities to ensure a supply of
coal at a moderate rate for the poorer portion of jbhe population^
but they have not been able to interfere to any great extent with
the action of the coal merchants.

** The position of the textile industry in Poland is going from
bad to worse. Not only is the disorganization of labour as great
as ever, but buyers who used to get their supplies in Polai^ have
now learnt to rely on other manufacturing centres : mpreoyer
the increased cost of production admits (tf the iinportation of com-
paratively low counts of yams and of manufis^tured goods which ^
in spite of the high duty, can be sold here at a .price co^derably
lower thaii that at which they can now be. manufiictured in the
country.

'* In spite of the usual autumn demand for woollen goods,
factories are working only three or four days in ..the week: ^more-
over it must be remembered that their, output^ owing jbo the
shorter working day and to the idleness of the workers, is not
more than two-^rds of what it was previously.

*' To give an idea of the changed conditions of the woollen
industry in Poland since 1904, tiie price of woollen yarn haa
ffone up> 60 per ceiit^ and the demand for woollei;i goods has
aeoreased by 50 per cent. The pay of a skilled hand has gone up
from 9 roubles a week for an ll| hours' day to 15 roubles a week
for a 10 hours' day. The pay of a boy has g(me up from 2*^
roubles to 6 roubles a week, and the workers are now claiming a
furthco* advance of 75 per cent, for skilled workers and 100 per
cent, fer boys. Besides this, no discipline can be maintained in
the works. . . •

"There is now consequently a large import fit>m Germany of
woollen goods which previously were unable to compete with
local prices. A great deal of these are ahoddy goods, but they



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Dec. 26^ 1907.] THB BOAU^ 0» iOtABB^ Y^tnUTiHr^ 607

Trad0 cmdlndudrial Conditimt in JPolwnd.



command a good^ price. as they 9ixe of foreign origin, and. every-
thing foreign is supposed to be of superior quality.

'* Trade with the Empire is &lling off more and more,^and^
the only markets remaining faithful to Polish manufactures are
the neighbouring Iiithutoian Governments, where industry ^ is
little developed.

" The men openly declare that their object is to ruin their
present employers, when, they say, they will get the factories and
all become rich. It is no use arguing with them or trying to.
point out the folly of such an idea. The belief is general amongst
them and is finnly held. Under these circumstances, as the pros-
perity of industry in Poland depends entirely on a plentiful supply
of good and dieap labour, it is diflScult to foresee any improvement
in the near future. . . . Csee below).

'* Little has been done in the way of public works in the
provincial towns lately. At Sosnowice, however, the much needed
paving of the streets has at last been carried out and the lighting
very much improved. Lodz is still waiting for its water supply and
proper drainage, but, owing to the impoverishment of tiie town
through the labour tronbles and consequent depression of industry,
there is no prospect of these being carried out yet awhile.

"The Oermans are negotiating with the Russian Government
for the establishment of a Consulate at Lods. They certainly need
one, for the number of German residents and the importance of
German industries are very great.

"In consequence of the general industrial depression and
disturbed state of the country there is little or nothing to be
heard of new works or of the extension of old ones. A bent-wood
furniture factory at Kielce, which will commence work very shortly,
and three new sugar refineries are almost the only exceptions."

H.M. Consul-Greneral at Warsaw has also forwarded a detailed
report on .the harvest of 1907 in his consular district. It may be
seen by persons interested, on application at the Commeroial'
Intelligence Branch of the Board of Trade, 73, Basingball Steeet,
London, E.G.



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THE BOASD OF TEADE JOUSNAL. [Dec. 86, 1907.

TARIFF CHANGES
AND CUSTOMS REGULATIONS.

UNITED KINGDOM-UNITED STATES OP
AMERICA.

The following Agreement between the United Kingdom and the

AffTAMnmit United States of America respecting com-

~i^"|^'^^ mercial travellers' samples entering the United

^F^^^\ Kingdom, and the import duty on British

^™^?. , works of art entering iJie United States, was

a 1 ^^ *? 4.1. signed at London on 19th November last : —

n ^^' "^ ^^ " The Government of His Britannic Majesty

Im rt Dtt^ " *"^ ^^^ Government of the United States of

Briti h W ki " America, being desirous of facilitating and

on an ^^^^ " extending the commercial relations existing

'' between their respective comitries, bat without

*' prejudice to the views held by each of them as to the interpreta-

" tion of the * most-favoured-nation * Article of the C!onvention of

*' Commerce between the two countries signed at London on the

" 3rd July, 1815, mutually agree as follows : —

" 1. In order to facilitate the clearance through the Customs
*' Department of the United Kingdom of samples of dutiable goods
*' brought into the territory of the United Kingdom by commercial
'* travellers of the United States of America, such samples being
'' for use as models or patterns for the purpose of obtaining orders^
'' and not for sale, His Majesty's Government agrees that the
" marks, stamps, or seals placed upon such samples by the Customs
*' authorities of the United States of America at the time of
'' exportation, and the officially attested list of such samples,
'' containing a full description thei*eof issued by the proper
'' authority, shall be accepted by the Customs dficials of the
*' United Kingdom as establishing their character as samples, and
'' exempting them from inspection on importation, except so far as
* ' may be necessary to establish that the samples produced are those
*' enumerated on the list. The Customs authorities of the United
" Kingdom may, however, affix a supplementary mark to such
*' samples in special cases where they may think this precaution
** necessary.

'' 2. The Government of the United States of America agrees to
'^ extend to the United Kingdom the special redaction of duty on
'* paintings in oil or water colours, pastels, pen and ink drawings^
'' and statuary, being the product of the industry of the United
'' Kingdom, authorized under section 3 of the Tariff Act of the
" United States, approved the 24th July, 1897.*

" 3. This Agreement shall continue in force until six months
'' from the date when either party shall notify the other of its
** intention to terminate it."

* The reduced duty authorized under section 8 of the United States Tariif Act is
li per cent, ad vmlorem. The ordisarj rate iB 30 per cent ad vmlorsm.



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Pec. 26, ld07.] THE BQABD OF TEADE JOUXNAL. 609

Tariff Changes andCiutomt ReguUxtiam.



UNITED KINaX>OM-BULOARIA«

The Boapd of Trade are informed by the Foreign Office that the

lutuie&timi of tli^ ratifications of the Ck>mmercial Convention,

A^^«!iL.!!iJr ^'^^ Protocol, and Declaration between

iS^mSJ^ ^^^ ^^^^ Kingdom and Bulgaria of 9th

P^«w^f4^. December, 1905, were exchanged at Sofia on

Convention. ^^^ ^g^ November.



AUSTRALIAN COMMONWEALTH.

Information has been received from the Representative of the

jj . . Commonwealth in London that " vapour lamps '*

?. were previously incorrectly classed for duty

*' Vanour Lamna " ^^ ^'^^ cablegram from the Commonwealtli
^ ^ • Government under item 180* instead of under

item 179 (6) — viz., at 15 per cent, under the General Tariff*, and

10 per cent ad valorem under the United Kingdom Tariff*.

Tlie following " minor articles ^ have, under Departmental Bye-

Pree Imnortation ^*^^' ^^^^^ added to the free list : —
#ir< ^. A»^«iL Coloured rubber in imitation of seaweed or
or unor Articles, g^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ artificial flowers.

Plough, trace, back, and tug chains for harness.

Discs for cultivators, ploughs, harrows, drills, scrub and cane
stalk cutters.

Fancy comers, catches and ornaments for cardboard boxes.

Machine tools : Double equilibrium saw frame, veneering
machines.

Tools of trade: Dies used in the manufacture of artificial
flowers.

With reference to the notice which was published on p. 559 of last
Ail tfrt\ ' week's issue of the " Board of Trade Journal "

ir^ttor^ respecting the regulations regarding the method
. - * of the payment of duty on certain advertising

SAffn^i matter sent to Australia, the Board of Trade

icegaiauons. j^^^^ ^^^ received, from the Representative of
the Commonwealth in London, an amended copy of the regulations
in which the references to the payment of duty on " insets " intro-
duced in magazines, &c., and on single copies addressed to
individuals in Australia, have been deleted.

MONTSERRAT.

With reference to the notice published in the " Board of Trade

SAviiAd Snort ^<^^T^ " ^<>^ 29th. November, 1906, giving the

XOTUMMI Joport export duties leviable under -Ordinance No. 4

^^^ of 1906 in the Presidenpy of Montserrat, the

Board of Trade have now received* a copy of a further Ordinance

* See p. 4«4 of the *' Board of Tnyie Journal;* for 5th Deoember, 1907.

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9tOJ



TBB BOlaB>^•» TftABE JOOBNJLL.



{.Dee/fS, 1907.



T4»riff ChemgM and CuMoms ReffulaHofU.



(No. ^ of 1907), which came into force on Idth May last, repealing
the Ordinanbe No. 4 of 1906, and at tiie same time providing, for
the most part, for the re^imposifcion of the export duties in fbroe
pMor to the operation of the Ordinance of 1906 on various aiticlea,
theerowth, produce, and manufacture of the President^.

The following statement shows the rates of daty leviable under
the new Ordinance of 1907; the rates previously in force being
given for purposes of comparison : —



Articlef.






Bate of Export Duty.


















Old Tariff


NewTkiiff








(No. 4 of 1906).


(Old. 3 of 1907).


Animab— *






#.


d.


#. d.


Aaset


•*•


Per head


3





2


Cattle


•*.


»i


8





9


Calres, nnder 6 months,


with










their mothers


...


»i


1





Free


Ooata


...


n





6


4


Howes


• ••


«»


7





5


Mules ... ^. ...


...


It


9


S


7 6


Pigs ... ... •..


...


*t





8


6


Sheep


...





'


8


6


Bay leares


...


Per 100 lbs.


1


2


1


Cants, felloes, naye^ and spokes


...


PerdoE.





6


3


Cocoa and coffee


•••


Per 100 lbs.


2


8


2 1


Cotton: Sea I6land, or other


long










staple Tarietiee


...


»»


4


4


4 2


„ short staple yarities...


...


t%


3


3


2 1


Com


•••


Per bushel





H


2


Essential oils^












Bay


...


PergaU,


2


Oi


2


Other kinds, if expressed or










equeUed


...





1


6i


1 6


AU other kinds, if otherwise










extracted


...


n





6*


6


Firewood


...


Per cord





6


Free


FYnits and yegetablee, fresh-












Bananas and plantains ...


Per 100 bunches


4


2


2 1


Limes and oranges


...


Per barrel





4


2


„ „ Per box not exceeding








3 onb. ft. per 100 boxes


6


S


2 1


Sweet potatoes




Perbafrel





4


2


AU other kinds


...Per 5 cub. ft.





4


2


Hides and skins-












Cattle hides




...Each





5^


S


AU other skins




Per dot.





4


3


Limejnice—












uoncentrated


...Per 100 gals.


9





S 4


• Baw- •




9*


1


6


10



f ^'^ Sucking pin and also Uds or lambs with their laotb^ra wore free ondsr te
old tiariC Untitor the new tariff aU snokiiig anlinBli (not exoaodiaf 'six i
oldX with tbeii.mothez8, are free of dntj.. . . .^



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J)m;2<^'U0?.]



3SB B04iP^OV V&M>S^017»BmN



m



T^atf^KiSfkanfm^^and Custo^ . jR i girf f ft'j^ p^ .



MONTSBRRAT-'^'^**^^-



Articles.



Old TarifE
(No. 4 of 1906).



Limes; |>iokled
Molasses...



Per doz.



PerhMrel

... Per 100 gala.

Papaine...

Peas mid beans.
Poultry ...

Starches (Tiz., arrowroot, sago, tapioca,
oassafa, and all similar starches
and preparations of the same) ... Per 100 lbs.
Sugar-*
Mnsoovado ... Per hogshead (over 32 in. truss)
„ ... Per tierce (over 28 in., and less

than 82 in.)
Cask (less than 29 in.)

Banelorbag

Syrup PerlOOgalls.

Tamarinds Per barrel

Trass



Bate of Export Daty.



New Tariff
(Ord.8o£1907).



4. d.

8.
2 9
21. 10#. 2d. per
100 lbs.
2
6



1 2



3 10

2. 8
1 4
7

4 10
4
2



#• 4*

6
2 1

e^f.perlb.

,0 1 .
3



1 PI

2 6



2
1
6
4 2
2
Free



Citrate of Liiiie
Ordinance, 1007



A fnriher Ordinatice (No. 5^ of 1907) has also been received, which
eame into force on 15th May, 1907, and
whioh proTidee for the free importation of chalk,
whiting or lime, when for use in the manufao-

tore of citrate of lime, into the Presidency of Montserrat.

Provision is also made in the Ordinance for the imposition of a

duty of l3. per cwt upon the exportation of citiate of bme mann-

fietotured in the Presidency,



EGYPT.

The Egyptian " Journal Officiel ** for the 2nd December contains
..p^^^ the following cevised Valuation Tariff for use in

Valn^ti^&TaTiff assessing duty on certain metals aujd metal

ito cSmM^ manufactures, which came into force on the

MftSS!^ 1st December, and is to remain in operation

dation.: —



until the 31st March, 1908.. or until denun-



"t ' '



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612



THE BOABD OP TEABE JOFRN AI^ [Dec 26, 1W7.



Tariff Changes and Cttstams BeffulaHons.



EGYPT— ^•o»^'»M««<'.



Articles.



Yalaation per kilogname.*



Former
Tariff.



Beriiod
Tariff.



Copper and brass sheets, round and bottoms

„ sheets, plain

,, „ in rolls, bars, ronnd and flat

„ ingots ...

„ wire ...
BfAss wire

„ sheets, plain, 24 by 48, 8 lbs. to 5 lbs.
I'ia ingots and bars
I«ead sheets

„ shot

„ piping ...

.t pig
7iiDC sheets and ingots
Phosphor bronze
Anf.imony
Quicksilver



HiUi^me8.t

93

90

90

87
ad valorem.



163
SI
2i
21
20
27

125
40

270



yilliemes.t
74

n

71

68

advaUrem,



132

20

21

20

19

25i
125

40
270



The same issue of the '' Journal Officiel " contains a notice to the
ir«i«i.^*n» T^viir effect that from the 1st December, 1907, to the
f^ili^m^ 31st January, 1908, or until further notice,
^^A q^kJIz »;-.• Rangoon rice will be valued for Tariff purposes
ana Baigon Km ^^ j qjq milUdmes* (H. 0^. 8K), and Saigon
rice at 925 millidmes* (18«. 11^.) per sack of 2 cwts. net in c»ch
case.



Period for

Presenttng

Petitions against

Customs Fines.



RUSSIA.

With reference to the notice which appeared at pp. 321-2 of the
" Board of Trade Journal " for the 14th Kovem-
Nr, on the subject of the fines imposed by the
liussian Customs Authorities on account of
clerical errors in bills of lading or other ship's
papers, the Board of Trade desire to draw
attention to the fact that a period of two mmUks from the date of
notification of the fine by the Customs is now allowed within
which to present a petition to the Ministry of finance &r a
remission or reduction of the penalty. The period of three weeks
fixed by the Russian Customs Regulations was extended to two
months by the Russo-German Commercial Convention of 1904 ;
and British exporters benefit by this concession in yirtne d the
most-favoured-nation clause of the Anglo-Russian Treaty of 1859.



* Dat J is leTiable on thetc ralaations at the rate of S per cent,
ton ia taken aa e^Talent to 1,016 kilopy.
f 1,000 mimdmea «r AS 1 » 1/. 0«. Sd,



TheSngliik



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Dee. 26, 1907.1 THE . BOABD OF TRADE JOU&NAL. Q IjS

Tariff Chanff€s and Cudana Regulaiiam.

RUSSIA-ITALY.

The Board of Trade are in receipt, through the Forei^ OflSce, of
N«w TraatT of » copy of * Treaty of Commerce and Navigation
r m^ A between Russia and Italy, which was signed at
BSIiSiSiJr ^^' P^^^^'sburg on the 15th/28th June last.
^^ This Treaty provides for reciprocal most-

favoured-nation treatment as regards import and export duties and
generally as regards the Customs regime of merchandise imported
into one country from the other, wim the following exceptions : —

1. The favours accorded at present or which may in future be
accorded to other bordering States in order to facilitate frontier
traffic. '

2. The favours relative to importation or exportation which are
accorded at present or which may hereafter be accorded to the
inhabitants of the Government of Archangel, as also with regard
to the northern and eastern coasts of Asiatic Russia (Siberia) ; but
imports from Italy into these territories are to benefit by all Customs
facilities accorded to imports from European States or from North
America.

3. The special stipulations contained in the Treaty between
Russia and Norway and Sweden of 26th April/oth May, 1838; and

4. The special stipulations relative to the trade with the Asiatic
States and countries bordering on Russia.

However, it is agreed that all favours other or greater than those
at present in opeitition, which may in future be accorded by Russia
to one of the bordering Asiatic countries in respect of silk
(Nob. 180(2)-(4), and 185(1) of the Russian Customs Tariff), and
in respect of oranges, lemons, cmd bitter oranges (No. 6(2) of the
Russian Customs Tariff) shall be extended to similar Italian pro-
ducts, except only as regards direct importations for internal con-
sumption into the Russian provinces of the Amour, Maritime, and
Transbaikal.

Annexed to the Treaty are two schedules (Tariff A. and B.)
specifying respectively the maximum duties leviable on certain
Russian products on importation into Italy, and on ceirtain Italian
products on importation into Russia. The following is a transla-
tion of Tariff A. (in which the existing duties have been inserted
for the purpose of comparison): —



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614



. tsa voyuoi or :nt«Bk YOrtnWAi.. < [Ima. m, mct.



WmifTChungm and Cuilomfi SeffuUaim:

RUSSIA-4TALY-«««««^.

TABIFP A.
Doms oir iMFOBTATioir nrro Jtilt. -



No. in






Bate of Duty.


Italton
TmtUL


Articles.








flzisting.


Fixed by the
BreasBtTiQi^.




!


Lire.


eta.


JJn. ds.






PerlOOhUogt.


Per 100 kOefM.


S


Mineral, redn and tar oil»»








(•)


Heavy

Aoe«.— For the tariff classifiqation


8


00


8 ^




_






^


of beayy minend oilt irom the Ist










January, 1911^ the official odour










type defined under No. lb ot the
Note to the heading «* Mineral oi^

















■ *


Jcc.*' in the Italian Tariff Repertory,










will he fixed by agreement between










the two Ck)ntracting Parties.








W


Other

JVirtfl. — The duty on petroleum
and othe^r mineral oils suitable for
lighting purposes, included under
No. 8^ may be calculated, at the
option of the importer, either on the
* weight or on the ▼olume. In the
latter case 125 litres at Ib^ C are
to be taken as equiyalent ta
100 kilogs. net.


24


00


24 00*


380


Wheat ... ... ,,, .,,


7


60


7 60t


281


Bye ••• ... ■ ••• ... , ••• •••


4


60


4 60:


28S


Oats


4


00


4 OOt


388


iNirl^y •.• ••• ' •.. .•• ' ••.


4


00


4 OOJ



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